Credit Courses

The following descriptions are in alphabetical order by subject field; thus, the three letter abbreviated code may not be in alphabetical order. For example, MKT precedes MAT because alphabetically, Marketing precedes Mathematics. The college reserves the right to reproduce student work and retain copies of student work for teaching and exhibition purposes. The college will not be held liable for lost, stolen, or damaged work.

Note: Course fees are given in the class schedule.

Term Key:

  • (S) - Spring
  • (F) - Fall
  • (Su) - Summer


Accounting
Business and Agri-Industries
217/351-2213 • www.parkland.edu/bai
ACC 101 Financial Accounting
4-0-4
(IAI BUS 903) Financial statements as related to investors, creditors, and managers. Includes cash, receivables, inventory, noncurrent assets, investments, liabilities, and equities. F S Su
ACC 102 Managerial Accounting
3-0-3
(IAI BUS 904) Managerial accounting concepts and procedures including classification of costs, job order and process cost systems, budgeting, standard costs and variance analysis, capital budgeting, variable and absorption costing, and cost allocation. Prerequisite: ACC 101. F S Su
ACC 117 Accounting and Bookkeeping
3-0-3
Applied accounting and bookkeeping techniques covering the accounting cycle, special journals and ledgers, adjustments, accounts receivable and accounts payable, bank reconciliation, and payroll. Credit not given for both ACC 101 and ACC 117. F S
ACC 201 Intermediate Accounting
4-0-4
Development, usefulness, and limitation of general financial accounting theory and practice with in-depth study of corporate capital, asset, and liability side of balance sheet, plus an analysis of income and cash flow statements. Use of Excel spreadsheet applications. Prerequisites: ACC 101 and CIS 101 or equivalent. S
ACC 219 Computerized Integrated Accounting
2-2-3
Accounting principles are integrated into computerized format. Develops understanding of computerized applications, including general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, inventory, and payroll. Prerequisites: ACC 101 or ACC 117. Microcomputer experience recommended. F S
ACC 274 Principles of Income Taxation
4-0-4
Introduction to federal income taxation and income tax forms relevant to most taxpayers. Focus on measurement and reporting of taxable income (including property transactions). F
ACC 275 Payroll Tax Accounting
3-0-3
Introduction to payroll accounting, including preparing quarterly and annual payroll tax forms and the use of computer applications. Prerequisite: ACC 101 or ACC 117. S

Automotive Collision Repair
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
ACR 116 Collision Repair Electrical Analysis
3-2-4
Theory and repair of electrical and electronic systems related to the collision repair industry. Includes electrical theory, DVOM use, wire and circuit repairs, electronic diagnosis of ABS and SIR systems, and schematic usage. Prerequisites: ACR 130, ACR 133, and MAT 131. Su
ACR 130 Unibody Construction, Estimating, and Measuring Principles
4-0-4
Overview of collision repair industry; emphasis on unibody vehicles and the repair process. Includes cost estimating and different measuring systems. Prerequisites: approval of program director or department chair and concurrent enrollment in ACR 131 and ACR 133. F S
ACR 131 Collision Repair Work Experience I
0-10-2
Work experience in collision repair designed to reinforce class material. Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in ACR 130 and ACR 133. F S
ACR 133 Unibody Collision Repair
3-0-3
Straightening systems and tech welding in unibody collision repair; restore corrosion protection; outer panel protection; dent repair, door skins, quarter panels; remove and install fenders, doors, and decklids. Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in ACR 130 and ACR 131. F S
ACR 134 Collision Repair Work Experience II
0-10-2
Work experience in collision repair designed to reinforce class material and enhance ACR 131. Prerequisite: ACR 131. F S Su
ACR 135 Collision Repair: Glass, Plastic, Trim, and Structural Repair
3-0-3
Second course in collision repair series that develops student repair knowledge. Includes passive restraints, glass work, plastics and plastic repairs, measuring principles, frame straightening techniques, and replacing and repairing structural components. Prerequisite: ACR 130. F S
ACR 136 Collision Repair Work Experience III
0-10-2
Work experience in collision repair designed to reinforce class material and to enhance ACR 134. Prerequisites: ACR 131 and ACR 134. F S Su
ACR 137 Vehicle Prep/Top Coat Application
4-0-4
Collision repair paint systems, refinishing materials, blending techniques, surface preparation, safety practices, painting equipment, applying finish, and paint application problems. Prerequisites: ACR 130 and ACR 131 or approval of instructor or department chair. F S
ACR 154 Collision Repair Mechanical Analysis
3-2-4
Theory and repair of mechanical systems most often affected by collisions; includes steering, suspension, wheel alignment, brakes, air conditioning, and cooling systems. Prerequisite: ACR 130. F S
ACR 155 Custom Automotive Upholstery
2-3-3
Basic and advanced principles of automotive custom upholstery fabrication including repair, design, and identification of materials used in the industry. F Su
ACR 156 Custom Refinish Techniques
1-3-2
Theories of custom refinish and styling: hands-on experience with custom automotive finishes, flames, scallops, shadowing, airbrush, and hidden designs. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in ACR 137 or approval of instructor or department chair. F S
ACR 272 Advanced Structural Repair
2-1-2.5
Diagnosis and repair of today's unique vehicle structures emphasizing hydroformed full-frame vehicles, space-frame structures, and aluminum unibody vehicles. Analysis of the vehicle center section. Strategy for making a three-point measurement with computerized measuring systems. Prerequisites: ACR 130, ACR 133, and ACR 154. F
ACR 273 Advanced Vehicle Systems
2-1-2.5
Operation, diagnosis, and repair of advanced vehicle systems including anti-lock brakes, traction control, SRS airbag systems, convenience systems, navigation systems, speed control, power accessories, collision avoidance systems, and active suspensions. Prerequisite: ACR 116 or approval of instructor or department chair. S
ACR 274 Advanced Refinish Techniques
2-1-2.5
Advanced color theory, color evaluation and tinting, mica/pearl control techniques, wet bed blends, let down panels, tri-coats, quad-coats, advanced spot repair, paint defect evaluation and repair. Prerequisite: ACR 137 or approval of instructor or department chair. Su

Automotive
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
AFD 112 Introduction to Power Trains
3-3-4
Component parts and principles employed in the transference of power from engine to drive axles; clutches, manual transmissions, trans-axles, axles, differentials, propeller shafts, and drive axles. S
AFD 115 Basic Chassis Electrical Systems
3-3-4
Theoretical and practical aspects of electricity. Cranking, charging, and accessory systems components and wiring circuits; introduction to semiconductors and electronics. S
AFD 117 Basic Automotive Electronics and Computer Control Strategies
2-2-3
Basic automotive electronics fundamentals including solid-state components such as sensors, actuators, and microprocessors. Automotive computer components and control strategies. Use of appropriate diagnostic equipment such as DVMs, oscilloscopes, and scan tools. S
AFD 119 Chassis Electrical/Electronic Systems and Accessories
3-2-4
Advanced study of automotive electrical and electronic circuitry emphasizing ignition, solid state components, and processor-driven systems. Concentration on controlling devices, chassis and body wiring, troubleshooting, diagnostics, and repair procedures. Prerequisites: AFD 115 and AFD 117. F
AFD 132 Internal Combustion Engine Theory
2-4-4
Application of theory and laboratory situations pertaining to present-day power plants; engine operation, construction, disassembly, precision measuring, machining, and reassembly. Successful completion of this course satisfies AFD 114 program requirement. Credit not given for both AFD 114 and AFD 132. F
AFD 153 Brake Systems
3-2-4
Hydraulic brake systems on passenger vehicles and light trucks; disc, drum, biasing valves, and power boosters; use of lathes and other special tools; and ABS. F
AFD 210 Automotive Work Experience Seminar
2-0-2
Preparation for work in the automotive industry, including resume preparation, interviewing, insurance paperwork, and the ten basic work ethics traits employers seek. Also covers problems specific to the automotive work environment. F
AFD 211 Auto Work Experience
0-10-2 or 0-20-4-
On-the-job work experience for students preparing for employment in the automotive industry. Student is required to have an approved position, appropriate tools, and to speak with instructor prior to start. Prerequisites: AFD 119 and AFD 295 or approval of instructor or department chair. F S Su
AFD 217 Basic Refrigeration
3-2-4
Construction and operation of mobile refrigerated units with emphasis on maintenance, service, diagnosis, and repair of automotive and light truck air conditioners. S
AFD 231 Fuel and Emissions Diagnosis
3-2-4
Diagnosis and service of electronic and computer systems using appropriate tools; fuel system analysis; on-the-vehicle adjustments; operation and maintenance of emission control systems. Drivability diagnosis emphasized. Prerequisites: AFD 115 and AFD 132. F
AFD 232 Multi-Cylinder Engine Overhaul
2-6-5
Multi-cylinder engine analysis, disassembly, repair, part replacement, and reassembly; development of skills required to make repairs and overhaul multi-cylinder engines. Prerequisites: AFD 115 and AFD 132. S
AFD 233 Automatic Transmissions
3-3-4
Theory and overhaul procedures for automotive and light truck automatic transmissions. Students work on transmissions in both lab and car, including transaxles.
AFD 253 Wheel Alignment, Steering, and Suspension
2 -2 -3
Wheel alignment equipment, setup, and adjustment; suspension systems components and service; steering gears, power steering; MacPherson strut, front-wheel drive, and four-wheel alignment. Wheels, tires, and balancing will also be covered. F
AFD 270 Diesel Engine Operations
2-2-3
Theoretical and practical operation of both the 6.4L DIT Navistar diesel engine and the Ford 6.7L DIT engine used by Ford Motor Company in their super-duty trucks. Students who successfully complete their course receive Ford Motor Company certification in Diesel Engine Performance (51S08T2) and 6.7 Diesel Diagnosis and Repair (51S13T0) Prerequisites: credit or concurrent enrollment in AFD/AFM 115 and AFD/AFM 132, and Ford Certification STST area 32 and 34, or approval of instructor or department chair. S
AFD 272 Motorsport Work Experience I
0-10-2
On-the-job work experience for students preparing for employment in the Motorsport industry. Student is required to have an approved position, appropriate tools, and instructor consent prior to start. Prerequisites: AFD 297 and AFD 298. F S Su
AFD 273 Motorsport Work Experience II
0-10-2
On-the-job work experience for students preparing for employment in the Motorsport industry. Student is required to have an approved position, appropriate tools, and instructor consent prior to start. Prerequisites: AFD 297 and AFD 298. F S Su
AFD 290 Engine Performance and Chassis Repair Service Operations
2-2-3
Simulation of automotive repair facility environment, chassis repair, engine testing, and customer relations. Prerequisites: AFD 132, AFD 153, and AFD 253 or approval of instructor or department chair. S
AFD 291 Advanced Electrical and Computer-Control Service Operations
2-2-3
Simulation of automotive repair facility environment, advanced electrical/computer diagnosis and repair. Prerequisites: AFD 115, AFD 117, and AFD 231 or approval of instructor or department chair. S
AFD 295 Service Shop Operations
2-2-3
Simulation of automotive shop situations including customer relations, vehicle diagnosis, repairs, and flat-rate concept. Learn shop practices, reinforce previously learned skills, and make smoother transition to placement experience. Prerequisites: AFD 119 and AFD 231 or approval of instructor or department chair. S
AFD 296 Motorsport Vehicle System Assessment
2-2-3
Simulation of automotive aftermarket component installation repair shop. Emphasis on component selection, installation, and testing. Students will learn new shop practices, reinforce previously learned skills, and transition smoothly to job placement. Prerequisites: AFD 119, AFD 231, and approval of instructor or department chair. Su
AFD 297 Motorsport Concepts and Vehicle Preparation
3-2-4
Introduction to proper motorsport vehicle maintenance, repair, and basic chassis tuning according to specifications set by, but not limited to, NHRA, IHRA, UMP, IMCA, and SCCA.
AFD 298 Motorsport Chassis Analysis
2-6-5
Application of typical motorsport chassis design, assembly of manufactured frames, and selection of components into a completed chassis for motorsport competition. Prerequisite: AFD 297. S

Automotive Ford ASSET Program
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
AFM 112 Manual Transmission and Drivetrains
3-3-4
Component parts and principles employed in the transference of power from engine to drive axles; clutches, manual transmission, transaxles, axles, differentials, propeller shafts, drive axle suspensions. Students who successfully complete this course will receive certification from Ford Motor Company in Manual Transmission and Transaxle Diagnosis (36S12T0), and Differential and 4WD Systems Diagnosis and Repair (36S17T0). Su
AFM 115 Basic Automotive Electrical/Electronics
5-3-6
Theoretical and practical aspects of electricity. Cranking, charging, and accessory systems components and wiring circuits. Basic fundamentals of electronics. Students who successfully complete this course will receive certification from Ford Motor Company in Basic Electrical Diagnosis (34S14T0). F
AFM 117 Computer Controls and Scan Tools
3-2-4
Automotive computers and control strategies, networks and multiplexing, electrical/electronic accessories, supplemental restraint systems, and introduction to drive-ability. Use of appropriate diagnostic equipment such as DVMs, oscilloscopes, and scan tools, will be emphasized. Students who successfully complete this course will receive certification from Ford Motor Company in Electronic System Diagnosis (34S19T1). Prerequisite: AFM 115. S
AFM 118 Noise, Vibration, and Harshness Principles and Diagnosis
1-2-2
Skills and knowledge required to pinpoint an NVH concern to a vehicle system. All aspects of NVH including fundamentals of NVH, NVH diagnostic tools and equipment, diagnosis of vibration concerns, diagnosis of noise concerns, and diagnosis of harshness concerns. Students who successfully complete this course will receive certification from Ford Motor Company in Noise, Vibration, and Harshness Principles and Diagnosis (30S06T0). S
AFM 132 Internal Combustion Engine
2-4-4
Application of theory and laboratory situations pertaining to present day power plants; engine operation, construction, dis-assembly, precision measuring, machining, and reassembly. Students who successfully complete this course will receive certification from Ford Motor Company in Engine Repair (32S09T0). S
AFM 153 Brakes and ABS
3-2-4
Hydraulic brake systems on passenger vehicles and light trucks; disc, drum, biasing valves, and power boosters; use of lathes and other special tools; anti-skid systems and stability control systems. Students who successfully complete this course will receive certification from Ford Motor Company in Brake System Diagnosis and Repair (38S07T1) and Advanced Brake System Diagnosis and Service (38S08T1). S
AFM 156 Dealership Operations
2-0-2
Daily operations of modern Ford and Lincoln dealership service departments, including ethical and legal issues. F
AFM 217 Climate Control Systems
3-2-4
Construction and operation of climate control systems with emphasis on maintenance, service, and diagnosis and repair of automotive and light truck air conditioners. Students who successfully complete this course will receive certification from Ford Motor Company in Advanced Climate Control Diagnosis (35S05T0). Su
AFM 233 Automatic Transmissions
4-3-5
Theory, diagnostic, and overhaul procedures for Ford Motor Company automatic transmissions/trans-axles. Students who successfully complete this course will receive certification from Ford Motor Company for Automatic Transmission Service (37S13T0) and Automatic Transmission Advanced Diagnosis (37S15T0). S
AFM 252 Engine Performance
6-4-8
Advanced study of automotive electrical and electronic circuitry emphasizing diagnosis and services of electronic ignition systems, fuel systems, and emission control systems. Driveability diagnosis emphasized. Students who successfully complete this course receive Ford Motor Company Certification in Engine Performance Operation and Diagnosis (31S26T0) and Advanced Engine Performance Diagnosis and Testing (31S28T0). Prerequisites: AFM 115, AFM 117, and Ford Certification Area 34. F
AFM 253 Steering and Suspension
2-2-3
Wheel alignment equipment, setup, and adjustment; suspension systems components and service; steering gears, power steering; struts, front-wheel drive, four-wheel alignment; wheels, tires, and balancing, and electronic steering and suspension systems. Students who successfully complete this course will receive certification from Ford Motor Company in Steering and Suspension (33S15T0). Su
AFM 256 Directed Co-Op I (Dealership)
0-10-2
Work experience sessions will provide the opportunity for students to apply the knowledge and skills obtained during classroom activities including, but not limited to, work ethics and mechanical skills. All work experience sessions must be completed in a Ford or Lincoln dealership as per Ford Motor Company requirements. F
AFM 257 Directed Co-Op II (Dealership)
0-10-2
Work experience sessions will provide the opportunity for students to apply the knowledge and skills obtained during classroom activities including, but not limited to, work ethics and mechanical skills. All work experience sessions must be completed in a Ford or Lincoln dealership as per Ford Motor Company requirements. S
AFM 258 Directed Co-Op III (Dealership)
0-10-2
Work experience sessions will provide the opportunity for students to apply the knowledge and skills obtained during classroom activities including, but not limited to, work ethics and mechanical skills. All work experience sessions must be completed in a Ford or Lincoln dealership as per Ford Motor Company requirements. F
AFM 259 Directed Co-Op IV (Dealership)
0-10-2
Work experience sessions will provide the opportunity for students to apply the knowledge and skills obtained during classroom activities including, but not limited to, work ethics and mechanical skills. All work experience sessions must be completed in a Ford or Lincoln dealership as per Ford Motor Company requirements. S

Air Force Aerospace Studies
Admissions and Records
217/353-2638
AFS 101 Found of the U.S. Air Force I
1-1-1
Introduces students to the United States Air Force and provides an overview of the basic characteristics, missions, and organization of the Air Force. Prerequisite: approval of professor of Aerospace Studies. F
AFS 102 Found of the U.S. Air Force II
1-1-1
Continuation of AFS 101. Organizational structure and missions of Air Force organizations, military customs and courtesies, officership and core values, and an introduction to written and oral communication skills. Prerequisite: AFS 101 or approval of professor of Aerospace Studies. F
AFS 123 Dev of Air and Space Power I
1-1-1
Historical survey of trends, events, and policies that led to the emergence of air power through the Korean Conflict. Also provides an introduction to basic leadership and management skills, ethical decision making, and basic communication skills. Prerequisite: AFS 102 or approval of professor of Aerospace Studies. S
AFS 124 Dev of Air and Space Power II
1-1-1
Continuation of AFS 123. Historical survey of trends, events, and policies that led to the emergence of air power through Operation ALLIED FORCE. Also provides an introduction to basic leadership and management skills, ethical decision making, and basic communication skills. Prerequisite: AFS 123 or approval of professor of Aerospace Studies. S

Agriculture
Business and Agri-Industries
217/351-2213 • www.parkland.edu/bai
AGB 101 Introduction to Animal Science
3-2-4
(IAI AG 902) Principles of livestock production. Includes animal products, breed identification, livestock selection, genetics and reproduction, nutrition and ration formulation, and livestock management practices. F S
AGB 102 Introduction to Agricultural Economics
4-0-4
(IAI AG 901) Principles of economics as applied to agriculture; basic economic principles, finance, land, marketing, input allocation, and pricing, international trade, agricultural policies, fiscal and monetary policies. F S
AGB 103 Introduction to Crop Science
3-2-4
(IAI AG 903) Various plant species of economic importance; principles of plant growth, environment, selection, classification, cultural practices; weed, insect, and disease identification and control. F S
AGB 104 Introduction to Horticultural Science
3-2-4
(IAI AG 905) Horticultural crop biology, technology, and industry. Includes classification, plant structure, growth and development, environmental factors, mechanisms of propagation, plant improvement, harvesting, marketing, geography, and aesthetics of horticultural crops (fruits, vegetables, greenhouse, turf, nursery, floral, and landscape). F S
AGB 105 Agricultural Applications of the Computer
3-0-3
(IAI AG 913) Introduction to computer hardware, platform environments, file manipulation, printers and the use of word processing, electronic presentations and communications, graphics, spreadsheet, and database management software; solution of agriculture data-related problems and use of prepared software and templates. F S Su
AGB 106 International Agricultural Field Experience
1-6-3
Role of agriculture in international food production, international trade, governmental policy, and cultural and economic diversity influence on agriculture; requires a supervised international field experience.
AGB 112 Concepts in Agriculture
1-0-1
Academic and career goal setting and planning for agriculture students, discussion of issues in agriculture, and development of problem-solving and communication skills. F
AGB 133 Introduction to Agricultural Marketing and Standards
2-2-3
Survey of approaches to marketing agricultural products; implications for the producer, consumer, processor, and government; use of grain grading and standardization equipment. S
AGB 135 Agricultural Business Management
4-0-4
Organization and structure of agricultural businesses; resource evaluation, policy development and implementation, functions of management, and laws and taxes that affect business. F S
AGB 155 Agricultural Salesmanship
3-0-3
Role, dynamics, and principles of sales communications as related to food and agriculture; methods for analyzing, setting objectives, planning, conducting, and evaluating sales communications efforts; sales presentations. F S
AGB 170 Equitation I
1-2-2
Fundamentals of equitation with emphasis on balance, control, safety principles; theory and execution of three gaits with and without stirrups and/or saddle; tack and grooming tools, procedures, and use. Repeatable for a maximum of 8 credit hours.
AGB 171 Horse Selection
2-2-3
Basic principles of horse selection; anatomy and selection of the horse, with stress on identifying unsoundness, vices, and conformation faults; relationship of form to function; genetics, breeding systems, successful breeding programs.
AGB 173 Horse Breeding and Management
2-2-3
Practical principles of horse breeding and management; stud management, artificial insemination, care of open and bred mares, foaling, care of foal, care of yearlings and two-year-olds, merchandising of stallion and produce.
AGB 191 Agri-Business Work Exploration
0-10-2
Placement in agricultural business for 150 hours of work in career exploration, developing skill requirements, and occupational opportunities. Dual supervision by college staff and cooperating businesses. Prerequisite: completion of 15 semester hours of college credit within the program area in which placement is desired. F S Su
AGB 193 United States Agricultural Field Experience
1-6-3
Role of agriculture in U.S. food production, national trade, governmental policy, and cultural and economic diversity influence on agriculture; requires a supervised national field experience.
AGB 200 Introduction to Soil Science
3-2-4
(IAI AG 904) Fundamentals of soil formation, development, texture, structure, color, temperature, moisture, organisms, organic matter, chemical composition, clay minerals, classification, nutrient testing, fertilizer use, conservation, and management. Includes laboratory projects. F S
AGB 201 Introduction to Agricultural Mechanization
2-2-3
(IAI AG 906) Principles and applications of agricultural mechanization with emphasis on structures, electrification, power sources, and soil and water conservation. S
AGB 202 Introduction to Agricultural Education
3-0-3
Overview of agricultural education and leadership career pathways. Topics include university extension services, teacher certification requirements, and current issues for agricultural education professionals. Students will be required to visit and survey several high school agricultural education programs. S
AGB 209 Companion Animal Management
2-2-3
Discuss many aspects of companion animal ownership. Includes breeding and reproduction, anatomy, nutrition, health care, and animal behavior. Species include dogs, cats, birds, and small animals. Prerequisite: AGB 101 or approval of instructor.
AGB 211 Plant Pest Identification and Control
3-0-3
Identification and control of weeds, insects, and diseases. Control methods include prevention, biological control, resistant varieties, and pesticides. Pesticide terminology, formulations, calibration, environmental concerns, safe handling, and laws and regulations concerning pesticides. Prerequisite: AGB 103 or AGB 104. Su
AGB 212 Weed Identification and Control
0-2-1
Principles and applications of weed control by identifying 70 weed species, 30 herbicides and associated crop/weed response, use of spray equipment, and solving problems related to herbicide use. Prerequisite: AGB 103 or AGB 104. S
AGB 213 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers
3-0-3
Use of fertilizers for peak production at optimum cost; evaluation and comparison of different forms of macro- and micro-nutrients, their manufacture, handling, and application; plant and soil chemistry. Prerequisite: AGB 200. S
AGB 214 Precision Farming Technology
2-2-3
Introduction to the most common tools used in precision farming: global positioning systems, geographic information systems, variable rate technology, and yield monitoring. F
AGB 215 Applications of Geographic Information Systems
3-0-3
Fundamental processes of geographic information systems (GIS) with application to agriculture. File formats, database management, spatial analysis, and manipulation of data. Georeferenced data from mapping and yield monitoring. S
AGB 217 Principles of Animal Feeding and Nutrition
3-0-3
Fundamental principles of animal nutrition with emphasis on practical feeding of livestock, calculation of rations, economic considerations, and new developments in animal nutrition and livestock feeding, composition, properties, values, and use of important feedstuffs. AGB 101 recommended. F
AGB 218 Livestock Management
5-0-5
Fundamentals of livestock production relating to acquisition, processing, herd health, nutrition, marketing, and facility needs of livestock in all stages of production. AGB 217 recommended. Prerequisite: AGB 101 or approval of instructor.
AGB 232 Agricultural Business and Farm Management
4-0-4
This course explores agricultural business management methods including decision making, strategic planning, budgeting, financing, human resources, acquisition of real estate, and appraisal of farmland. Use of spreadsheet programs to assist in management decision making is also examined. F
AGB 233 Grain Marketing
3-0-3
Fundamentals of mechanics of futures and options markets. Emphasis on how individuals should develop grain marketing plans and how and when to use futures and options rather than forward pricing, price-later, speculating, or other choices in management of risk. F S Su
AGB 236 Agricultural Credit and Finance
2-0-2
Place of credit in farming and agricultural business; use of equity and debt capital as a management tool. Credit analysis as seen by borrower and lender; legal concepts in finance; application of short-term and long-term credit. Prerequisite: AGB 102. S
AGB 238 Grain Merchandising
3-0-3
Fundamentals of accumulating and merchandising grain from perspective of country grain elevator. Emphasis on learning skills and building good habits, with particular emphasis on mechanics of basis trading, while respecting natural market forces. F S
AGB 239 Advanced Grain Marketing
2-0-2
Analysis of agricultural commodity futures markets. Specific fundamental analysis factors, various technical analysis methods, and advanced hedging techniques. Prerequisite: AGB 233 or approval of instructor or department chair. F S
AGB 252 Advanced Applications of Geographic Information Systems
3-0-3
Advanced processes of Geographic Information Systems with emphasis on use of raster and vector data in integrated environment; use of raster tools in ArcMap. Prerequisite: AGB 215 or approval of department chair.
AGB 270 Equitation II
1-2-2
Extended instruction on equitation principles, grooming, proper tack, and refinement of skills necessary for riding and instruction; equitation and instruction techniques as outlined by various breed associations. Repeatable for a maximum of 8 credit hours. Prerequisite: AGB 170.
AGB 271 Horse Behavior and Handling
2-2-3
Equine psychology, motivation, and response emphasizing handling and training techniques with horses of all ages and temperaments; practical application of the above techniques for safety of both horse and handler. Tack selection, use, and maintenance.
AGB 273 Horse Health Care
3-0-3
Fundamentals of veterinary skills utilized in treating horses. Emphasis placed on preventive medicine program, surgery, reproduction, lameness, and various diseases of the horse.
AGB 275 Stable Business Management
4-0-4
Financial records, insurance, and other management topics specific to the various equine business types; including boarding, breeding, training, and equitation instruction. Stable design, fencing, arenas, and their construction; equipment selection, maintenance, and use. S
AGB 290 Agri-Business Seminar
1-0-1
Seminar designed to assist students dealing with the management and day-to-day decision making involved in the operation of an agricultural/agri-business firm. Prerequisite: approval for placement. S
AGB 291 Agri-Business Work Experience
0-20-4
Placement in an agricultural business for 300 hours of work experience. Dual supervision by college staff and cooperating business. Prerequisite: completion of 45 semester hours of college credit within the program area in which placement is desired. F S Su

Applied Learning Skills - Math
Center for Academic Success
217/351-2441 • www.parkland.edu/cas
ALM 109 Topics from Prealgebra (A)
1-0-1
Number properties and rounding; operations with integers; estimation, absolute value, properties of integer operations; simplifying algebraic expressions. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Can be used for modular completion of MAT 060 (formerly MAT 094) per math department chair approval. F S Su
ALM 111 Topics from Prealgebra (B)
1-0-1
Solving linear equations using addition and multiplication; word problems; applications involving perimeter and area. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Can be used for modular completion of MAT 060 (formerly MAT 094) per math department chair approval. F S Su
ALM 112 Topics from Prealgebra (C)
1-0-1
Operations with fractions and mixed numbers; equations containing fractions; operations with decimals and square roots; converting between decimals and fractions; equations with decimals. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Applicable towards modular completion of MAT 060 (formerly MAT 094) per math chair approval. F S Su
ALM 113 Topics from Elementary Algebra (A)
1-0-1
Operations using the real number system; absolute value; order of operations; properties of real numbers; evaluating algebraic expressions and formulas. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Can be used for modular completion of MAT 080 and MAT 081 (formerly MAT 095) per math department chair approval. F S Su
ALM 114 Topics from Elementary Algebra (B)
1-0-1
Rectangular coordinate system; arithmetic sequences; solving linear equations; solving for a specified variable; proportions and direct variation; modeling and word problems. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Can be used for modular completion of MAT 080 and MAT 081 (formerly MAT 095) per math chair approval. F S Su
ALM 115 Topics from Elementary Algebra (C)
1-0-1
Slope and equations of lines; systems of linear equations in two variables; applications of linear systems. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Can be used for modular completion of MAT 080 and MAT 081 (formerly MAT 095) per math department chair approval. F S Su
ALM 116 Topics from Elementary Algebra (D)
1-0-1
Solving linear inequalities and compound inequalities; solving absolute value equations and inequalities; graphing a single linear inequality. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Can be used for modular completion of MAT 080 and MAT 081 (formerly MAT 095) per math chair approval. F S Su
ALM 117 Topics from Elementary Algebra (E)
1-0-1
Exponent rules; negative exponents; scientific notation; polynomial operations; greatest common factor; factoring trinomials (ax^2+bx+c form trinomials with a = 1, 2, 3, 5); solving equations by factoring. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Applicable towards modular completion of MAT 080 and MAT 081 (formerly MAT 095) per math chair approval. F S Su
ALM 118 Topics from Intermediate Algebra (A)
1-0-1
Relations, functions, function notation, graphing and analysis of common algebraic functions, linear and quadratic regression. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Can be used for modular completion of MAT 085 and MAT 086 series (formerly MAT 098) per math department chair approval. F S Su
ALM 119 Topics from Intermediate Algebra (B)
1-0-1
Factoring polynomials: greatest common factor, grouping, trinomials, and special forms; solving equations by factoring. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Can be used for modular completion of MAT 085 and MAT 086 (formerly MAT 098) per math department chair approval. F S Su
ALM 120 Topics from Intermediate Algebra (C)
1-0-1
Rational functions; rational expressions: simplifying, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, complex fractions; rational equations; applications. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Can be used for modular completion of MAT 085 and MAT 086 (formerly MAT 098) per math department chair approval. F S Su
ALM 121 Topics from Intermediate Algebra (D)
1-0-1
Radical expressions: simplifying, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, rational exponents; equations containing radicals; applications. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Can be used for modular completion of the MAT 085 and MAT 086 (formerly MAT 098) per math department chair approval. F S Su
ALM 122 Topics from Intermediate Algebra (E)
1-0-1
Complex numbers; quadratic equations: extraction of roots, completing the square, quadratic formula; quadratic inequalities; applications. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Can be used for modular completion of the MAT 085 and MAT 086 (formerly MAT 098) per math department chair approval. F S Su
ALM 124 Topics from College Algebra
1-0-1
Study of selected college algebra topics: Relations and functions, linear, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic models, radicals and complex numbers, systems of equations and matrix methods, determinants and Cramer's Rule, sequences and series, and binomial theorem. May not be used to fulfill MAT 124 course requirement. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALM 125 Topics from College Trigonometry
1-0-1
Trigonometric functions, fundamental identities, graphing, solving trigonometric equations, inverse trigonometric functions, complex numbers, and vectors. May not be used to fulfill MAT 125 course requirement. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALM 128 Topics from Calculus (I)
1-0-1
Selected Calculus I topics from the following: functions; derivative and its applications; integral and its applications; limits and continuity; trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and hyperbolic functions. May not be used to fulfill MAT 128 course requirement. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALM 129 Topics from Calculus (II)
1-0-1
Selected Calculus II topics from the following: Conic sections, polar coordinates, methods of integration, applications of integration, parametric equations, indeterminate forms, infinite series. May not be used to fulfill MAT 129 course requirement. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALM 130 Topics from Geometry (A)
1-0-1
Logical reasoning and proofs, definitions and symbols, angle and line relationships. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALM 132 Topics from Geometry (C)
1-0-1
Logical reasoning and proofs, ratio and proportion, similar triangles, right triangles, and arc, angle, and segment relationships in circles. F S Su
ALM 133 Topics from Geometry (D)
1-0-1
Perimeter and area of polygons and circles, volume and surface area of solids. F S Su
ALM 140 Topics from Business Math
1-0-1
Selected topics from: scientific calculator usage; basic arithmetic operations, percentages, payroll, simple and compound interest, annuities, sinking funds, promissory notes, discounting, depreciation, merchandising, retailing, reconciliation, installment loans, periodic loans, mortgage loans, elementary descriptive statistics, spreadsheet applications. May not be used to fulfill MAT 110 course requirement. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALM 160 Topics from Statistics
1-0-1
Selected topics from: data organization, distributions, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, probability functions, sampling, normal distribution, expected value, estimation, hypothesis testing, t-test, chi-square analysis, analysis of variance, regression, correlation, nonparametric methods and decision theory with applications. May not be used to fulfill MAT 160 or MAT 108 course requirements. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALM 194 Topics from Prealgebra (D)
1-0-1
Ratio and proportion; fraction, decimal, and percent conversion; applications involving ratio, proportion, and percent; conversion of units using cancellation; introduction to Cartesian coordinate system and polynomials. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Applicable towards modular completion of MAT 060 (formerly MAT 094) per math chair approval. F S Su

Applied Learning Skills - Science
Center for Academic Success
217/351-2441 • www.parkland.edu/cas
ALN 135 Elementary Chemistry
1-0-1
Fundamental chemistry needed for success in CHE 100, including substances/mixtures, properties of matter, energy, atomic structure, Periodic Table, ions/isotopes, compounds: naming/formulas, metric system, chemical reactions, acids/bases.
ALN 151 EDGE Program\Collaborative Study Lab for BIO 121
0-2-1
Build skills needed to succeed in BIO 121. Small group interaction to solve problems related to core concepts, to enhance study and test taking skills in BIO 121. Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in BIO 121 and approval of department chair. F S

Applied Learning Skills - Reading
Center for Academic Success
217/351-2441 • www.parkland.edu/cas
Designed for the student who wants to learn or improve skills in one or more of the following skill areas: mathematics, reading, study skills, writing, and computer literacy. Specific instructional units are identified based on diagnostic test results and student goals; assignment to an appropriate ALM, ALR, ALS, or ALW course is completed by a lab instructor. Individualized instruction is provided on a small-group basis. Grades are determined by conference attendance, weekly evaluation, completion of assigned work and passing mastery tests. ALM, ALR, ALS, and ALW credits do not apply toward A.A., A.S., A.E.S., A.F.A., or A.G.S. degree programs.
ALR 131 Word Attack and Basic Comprehension I
1-0-1
Supplemental tutorial for ESL students with focus on improving English comprehension skills: main ideas, supporting details, inferences, fluency, phonemic awareness, and/or vocabulary building. Individualized instruction, supplemented with learning technology as needed. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 132 Basic Comprehension II
1-0-1
Supplemental ESL tutorial for improving English comprehension skills: main ideas, supporting details, inferences, fluency, and/or vocabulary building. Individualized instruction using English expository essay-length and narrative texts, supplemented with learning technology as needed. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 133 College Success Strategies I
1-0-1
Small group instruction in syllabus comprehension, time management, study habits, college resource use, college reading and learning strategies for students in CCS 098 or ENG 098. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 134 College Success Strategies II
1-0-1
Small group instruction in learning styles analysis, time management, study habits, college resource use, college reading and learning strategies for students in CCS 099, ENG 099, or college-level classes. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 135 Study and Test-Taking Skills I
1-0-1
Focus on learning and memory process, effective reading-to-learn strategies, learning styles analysis, practical study and test-taking skills. Practical application to student's other concurrent course(s). Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 136 Study and Test-Taking Skills II
1-0-1
Focus on learning and memory process, effective reading-to-learn and memorization strategies, test-preparation and test-taking skills, college vocabulary. Practical application to student's other concurrent course(s). Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 153 Essential Comprehension Skills
1-0-1
Develops comprehension and thinking skills for academic reading. Emphasizes active reading strategies. May be taken with ALR 154 and/or ALR 155 to meet CCS 098 requirements with reading director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 154 Essential Vocabulary Skills
1-0-1
Develops vocabulary skills for academic reading. Emphasizes active vocabulary-building strategies. May be taken with ALR 153 and/or ALR 155 to meet CCS 098 requirements with reading director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 155 Basic Novel Reading Skills
1-0-1
Uses novel reading to improve comprehension skills and expand vocabulary. May be taken with ALR 153 and/or ALR 154 to meet CCS 098 requirements with reading director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 156 Active Reading and the Learning Process
1-0-1
Develops high intermediate reading/study skills with emphasis on active reading and memory/learning processes. May be taken with ALR 157 and/or ALR 158 to meet CCS 099 requirements with reading director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 157 Summary and Critical Response Writing
1-0-1
Develops high-intermediate reading and thinking skills through summary and critical response writing. May be taken with ALR 156 and/or ALR 158 to meet CCS 099 requirements with reading director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 158 Novel Reading Strategies and Skills
1-0-1
Develops high-intermediate reading and thinking skills through active novel reading and written responses. May be taken with ALR 156 and/or ALR 157 to meet CCS 099 requirements with reading director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 191 Advanced Reading Skills I
1-0-1
Develop and practice advanced reading skills with focus on analysis, interpretation, and critical thinking. Students will also write concise summaries and critical responses to advanced reading selections. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALR 192 Advanced Reading Skills II
1-0-1
Practice advanced reading with focus on analysis and interpretation of challenging college-level texts, and critical thinking. Students will also develop skills to write concisely and critically about reading selections. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su

Applied Learning Skills - Assistive Technology
Center for Academic Success
217/351-2441 • www.parkland.edu/cas
ALS 176 Apply Asst Tech to Academics I
1-0-1
Exploration and evaluation of various assistive technologies for individual learning needs. Historical development and application to the online environment. Emphasis on online communication and strategies to support effective study skills. F S Su
ALS 177 Apply Asst Tech to Academic II
1-0-1
Exploration and evaluation of various assistive technologies for individual learning needs. Emphasis on strategies to facilitate comprehension and manipulation of written language. F S Su
ALS 196 Dental Hygiene Board Exam Prep
2-0-2
Reading-to-learn and memorization strategies, vocabulary building, test preparation and test-taking skills specific to the dental hygiene board exam. Major emphasis on case study analysis.


ALV 101 Private Pilot I Supplemental
0-1-0.5
Additional aeronautical experience for proficiency in AVI 101. Flight hours may be divided between dual instruction or solo flight for students' needs and determined by chief pilot. S/U grading only. Additional flight fee required. Prerequisite: consent of Chief Pilot. Su

Applied Learning Skills - Writing
Center for Academic Success
217/351-2441 • www.parkland.edu/cas
ALW 153 Intensive Grammar Instruction
1-0-1
Students will learn to write sentences that demonstrate a command of basic English grammar and punctuation. Correct use of phrases and clauses emphasized. Supplemental tutorial for ESL students. Repeatable for maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALW 154 Intensive Grammar Instruction II
1-0-1
Students will learn to write paragraphs that demonstrate a command of grammar and punctuation including correct use of period, comma, semicolon, colon, and quotation marks. Supplemental tutorial for ESL students. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALW 155 Writing Effective Sentences
1-0-1
Students will learn to write sentences that effectively utilize language - word choice, sentence structure, punctuation - to enhance their purpose. Emphasis on identification and correction of major sentence errors: run-on, comma splice, and sentence fragments. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALW 156 Writing Effective Paragraphs I
1-0-1
Focus on developing topic sentences and writing paragraphs that utilize topic sentences and concluding sentences to indicate direction and purpose. Emphasis on audience awareness. May be used for modular completion of ENG 098 per CAS director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALW 157 Writing Effective Paragraphs II
1-0-1
Focus on writing paragraphs that develop the topic sentence effectively. Practice use of a variety of writing strategies (narration, description, comparison-contrast, argumentation). May be used for modular completion of ENG 098 per CAS director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALW 158 Writing Effective Paragraphs III
1-0-1
Focus on writing well-organized paragraphs that stay focused on the primary topic and consistently maintain a point of view with appropriate use of transitions. May be used for modular completion of ENG 098 per CAS director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALW 159 Writing Effective Paragraphs IV
1-0-1
Focus on writing paragraphs that exhibit critical thinking and demonstrate some engagement with outside ideas and texts as well as the ability to support chosen positions. May be used for modular completion of ENG 098 per CAS director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALW 192 Writing Effective Essays I
1-0-1
Focus on writing multiple-paragraph essays that support a thesis or controlling idea. Emphasis on direction, purpose, and audience awareness. May be used for modular completion of ENG 099 per CAS director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALW 193 Writing Effective Essays II
1-0-1
Focus on writing multiple-paragraph essays that stay focused on a primary topic and consistently maintain a point of view. May be used for modular completion of ENG 099 per CAS director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALW 194 Writing Effective Essays III
1-0-1
Focus on writing multiple-paragraph essays that support their thesis statements effectively using a variety of writing strategies (e.g., narration, illustration, comparison-contrast, argumentation). May be used for modular completion of ENG 099 per CAS director approval. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su
ALW 195 Writing Effective Essays IV
1-0-1
Focus on writing multiple-paragraph essays that exhibit critical thinking and demonstrate engagement with outside ideas and texts. Repeatable for a maximum of 3 credit hours. F S Su

Anthropology
Social Sciences and Human Services
217/351-2229 • www.parkland.edu/sshs
ANT 101 Introduction to Anthropology
3-0-3
(IAI S1 900N) Introduction to the study of humankind. Attention given to humanity as both a living, evolving organism and creator and product of culture. Substantial emphasis placed on cross-cultural material. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
ANT 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3-0-3
(IAI S1 901N) Study of structure and process of culture. Presents major features of culture including subsistence patterns, organizing devices, language, patterns of cultural transmission, political organization, religion, family forms, and cultural change. Examines methods of anthropological research and major theoretical orientations. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
ANT 105 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
3-0-3
(IAI S1 902) Introduction to the principles and course of human evolution from the perspective of biological and social sciences; introduction to archaeological methods. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
ANT 200 Introduction to Archaeology
3-0-3
(IAI S1 903) General introduction to theory and methods of archaeology. Emphasis placed upon conduct of archaeological research. Archaeology of the Midwest given special attention. For anyone interested in finding out about the past. Optional field trips. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement.
ANT 220 Field Archaeology
1-2-2
Field studies in archaeology of various sections of North America. Emphasis on prehistoric cultures and on their relationships to biological and geological features of their environment. Prerequisites: an interest in science, good physical health, and approval of instructor or department chair. Su
ANT 289 Topics in Anthropology
3-0-3
Study of selected topics in anthropology. Topics vary according to section and semester and are listed in class schedule. Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in the discipline. A total of 6 credit hours may be taken in topics courses numbered 289.

Arabic
Humanities
217/351-2217 • www.parkland.edu/hum
ARA 101 Beginning Arabic I
5-0-5
For students with little or no previous instruction in the Arabic language. Emphasis on mastery of Arabic alphabet and phonetics; elementary formal grammar and development of reading and writing skills and conversation in formal non-colloquial style. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
ARA 102 Beginning Arabic II
5-0-5
Continued acquisition of language skills including phonetics, formal grammar and development of reading and writing skills; further development of communicative competence in formal non-colloquial style. Prerequisite: ARA 101 or equivalent. S
ARA 103 Intermediate Arabic I
5-0-5
Development of intermediate-level communicative competence. Emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and understanding of Arabic culture. Prerequisite: ARA 102 or equivalent. F
ARA 104 Intermediate Arabic II
5-0-5
Continued development and refinement of intermediate-level communicative competence. Emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, writing, and on Arabic culture. Prerequisite: ARA 103 or equivalent. S

Art
Fine and Applied Arts
217/351-2392 • www.parkland.edu/faa
Initial student expenses for art tools and supplies may be substantial. Though materials vary from course to course, prudent financial planning should include such costs.
ART 121 Two-Dimensional Design
1-5-3
Foundation course in basic design fundamentals: composition, form, balance, rhythm, movement, emphasis, variety, unity, proportion, and space. Concurrent enrollment in ART 122 recommended. F S Su
ART 122 Drawing I
1-5-3
Skill-oriented beginning representational drawing. Visualizing and basic drawing construction; linear perspective; presentation; elements of line, shape, value, and volume. F S Su
ART 123 Drawing II
1-5-3
In-depth investigation of various drawing media and papers. Design issues, expression, envisioned imagery, pathologies of drawing. For students in the Art and Graphic Design programs. Prerequisite: ART 122 with a grade of C or higher. F S
ART 124 Three-Dimensional Design
1-5-3
Foundation course in three-dimensional design fundamentals. Concurrent enrollment in ART 122 recommended. F S
ART 125 Color
1-5-3
In-depth examination of color; exploration and application of color theories and media. F
ART 128 Digital Photography
1-5-3
An introductory course covering the basic principles of digital photography as a fine art medium, including equipment selection and use, image processing, and aesthetics. Prerequisite: basic computer skills. F S Su
ART 129 Photography
1-5-3
Basic techniques and principles of photographic process in visual communication. Practical working use of camera, exposure, developing, and printing in black and white. F S
ART 130 Studio Photography I
1-5-3
Advanced skills with digital camera, lighting, and exposure evaluation. Hands-on experience working in a studio environment will provide creative opportunities to work in areas such as still life, portrait, and commercial work. Prerequisite: ART 128. S
ART 141 Watercolor I
1-5-3
Introduction to transparent watercolor. Emphasis on techniques, materials, and approaches to subject matter. Credit or concurrent enrollment in ART 122 recommended. S
ART 145 Ceramics I
1-5-3
Introduction to ceramic process. Hand-built and wheel-thrown forms; basic problems of forming, decoration, and glazing. For art majors and non-art majors. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credit hours. F S Su
ART 161 Art History I
3-0-3
(IAI F2 901) Survey of origins and development of visual arts, from prehistoric through Gothic period. F S
ART 162 Art History II
3-0-3
(IAI F2 902) Survey of origin and development of visual arts, Renaissance to present. Influence of past on contemporary art. (Also in Salzburg Program). F S
ART 163 History of Modern Art
3-0-3
(IAI F2 902) History of modernism in art from French Revolution to present with emphasis on contemporary issues. (Also in Salzburg Program) S
ART 164 History of Photography
3-0-3
(IAI F2904) History of photography in art and society from its discovery to present. F
ART 165 Art Appreciation
3-0-3
(IAI F2 900) Introductory survey of visual arts in relation to human society, with aim of providing wide acquaintance with art forms and an appreciation of factors that have determined their development. Includes museum field trips. (Also in Canterbury Program) F S Su
ART 166 Intro to Non-Western Art
3-0-3
(IAI F2 903N) Survey of origins and development of visual arts from cultures other than Western European.
ART 181 Sculpture I
1-5-3
Use of techniques, principles, and materials of sculpture to interpret contemporary subjects in three-dimensional sculptural forms. Aesthetic, historical, and social perspectives explored. F
ART 182 Sculpture II
1-5-3
Continued exploration and development of sculpture media and materials as means of expression. Emphasis on depth of conceptual development, professional presentation, documentation. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credit hours. F
ART 185 Metalwork and Jewelry I
1-5-3
Basic jewelry and metalworking techniques: sawing, piercing, filing, soldering, cold connections, forming, metal finishing. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Credit or concurrent enrollment in ART 121 recommended. F S
ART 186 Metalwork and Jewelry II
1-5-3
Continuation of ART 185 with greater exploration of conceptual and technical problems. Introduction to silver casting, advanced stone setting, repousse chasing, and inlay. Student may concentrate and research particular technique, while designing and executing individual projects. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Prerequisite: ART 185. F S
ART 201 Painting I
1-5-3
Introduction to techniques and principles of oil painting, preparation of painting surfaces, development of color, and explanation of pictorial space. Credit or concurrent enrollment in ART 122 recommended. (Also in Canterbury Program) F S
ART 202 Painting II
1-5-3
Application of technical painting skills to developing personal expression in response to various types of imagery. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Prerequisite: ART 201. F S
ART 221 Figure Drawing
1-5-3
Use of the figure as basis for anatomical study and accurate representational drawing. Drawing from skeleton and live models. For art majors. Prerequisite: ART 122 (ART 123 is also recommended). S
ART 228 Advanced Digital Photography
1-5-3
Advanced techniques and principles of the digital photographic process in visual communication. Exploration of materials and methods unique to digital photography with an emphasis on art. Prerequisite: ART 128. F S
ART 229 Advanced Photography
1-5-3
Advanced techniques and principles of photographic process in visual communication. Exploration of materials and aesthetics unique to photography with an emphasis on fine art. Advanced development of darkroom skills. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Prerequisite: ART 129. F S
ART 241 Watercolor II
1-5-3
Use of acrylic polymer, gouache, and other water-based media. Advanced problems in transparent and mixed-media watercolor painting. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Prerequisite: ART 141. F S
ART 245 Ceramics II
1-5-3
Continued development of technical ceramic skills including: wheel work, hand building, clay body, glaze formulation. Exploration of past and contemporary ceramic forms and ideas. For art and non-art majors. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Prerequisite: ART 145. F S Su
ART 283 Portfolio Seminar
1-0-1
Under faculty direction, students fine-tune and edit their portfolios, create an artist's statement, and develop their personal resumes. Includes lectures on presentation, demonstrations on taking professional images of artwork, and faculty reviews of final portfolio. Repeatable for a maximum of 2 credit hours. Prerequisites: ART 121, ART 122, ART 123, ART 124, sophomore standing in Art and Design or Art Education, or approval of instructor or department chair. F

Astronomy
Natural Sciences
217/351-2285 • www.parkland.edu/ns
AST 101 The Solar System
3-2-4
(IAI P1 906L) Introductory survey of the universe; historical ideas concerning stars and planets; structure and motions of the earth and moon; planetary motions; physical nature of the sun, planets, comets, asteroids, and meteors; origin and evolution of the solar system. Includes some evening telescope observations. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
AST 102 Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
3-2-4
(IAI P1 906L) Star distances, motions, structures, origin, and evolution; white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes; atoms and radiation; structures and evolution of galaxies (including the Milky Way) and the universe. Includes some evening telescopic observations. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su

Aviation
Aviation
AVI 101 Private Pilot I
2-2-3
First of a two-course sequence to prepare for FAA Private Pilot Certification. Covers aerodynamics airplane systems, airport and airplane operations, federal regulations, and airplane safety. Includes 30 hours flight training. Private pilot certification requires completion of AVI 120. Prerequisites: ENG 101 placement; MAT 107 placement; and non-native speakers of English: ibt TOEFL score - min. 85 overall (min. 22 listening; min. 26 speaking). F S
AVI 120 Private Pilot II
2-2.5-3
Second of a two-course sequence to prepare for FAA Private Pilot certification. Covers operation, navigation, night flying and meteorology. Flight training includes use of flight simulator. Private Pilot certificate issued upon successful completion of final examinations. Prerequisite: AVI 101. F S
AVI 129 Commercial Instrument I
2 -2.5 -3
First of two-course sequence to prepare private pilots for instrument rating; cross-country flight emphasizing instrument approaches and en-route instrument procedures; and instruction on instrument flying, navigation, aircraft instruments, and regulations. Flight training includes eight hours in flight simulator. Prerequisite: AVI 120. F S Su
AVI 140 Commercial Instrument II
2 -2.5 - 3
Second of a two-course sequence to prepare the private pilot for the instrument rating. Classroom instruction on instrument maneuvers, aerodynamics, navigation, and aircraft systems. Flight training includes eight hours in flight simulator. Prerequisite: AVI 129. F S
AVI 184 Aircraft Systems for Pilots
3-0-3
Basic aircraft systems, their components, and theory of operation. Familiarization of Federal Aviation Administration maintenance rules and regulations applicable to pilots. Prerequisite: AVI 120 or departmental approval. F S
AVI 200 Commercial Pilot I
2-3-3
Advanced course preparing for FAA Commercial Pilot Certification. Includes cross-country procedures, federal aviation regulations, maintenance inspections, and pilot responsibilities. Emphasizes complex airplane operation and instrument flying procedures. Flight training includes seven hours in a Flight Training Device. Prerequisite: AVI 140. F S
AVI 209 Commercial Pilot II
2-3 -3
Final course preparing for FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate with Instrument Rating. Reviews cross-country procedures, federal aviation regulations, commercial maneuvers, and pilot responsibilities. Emphasizes complex airplane operation and commercial maneuvers. Flight training includes six hours in Flight Training Device. Prerequisite: AVI 200. F S Su
AVI 220 Flight Instructor Certification Course
3 -2-4
Preparation for FAA Flight Instructor (Airplane) certificate. Teaching/learning principles, lesson planning, federal aviation regulations. Flight training includes one hour in flight simulator teaching techniques. One-hour flight check required. Prerequisite: FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate with Instrument Rating and director approval. F S Su
AVI 222 Instrument Flight Instructor
1 -1-1
Flight instruction and supervised training to add Instrument-Airplane rating to Flight Instructor certificate. Instrument operations emphasizing instructional aspects of operations. Includes a one-hour flight test. Prerequisites: FAA Commercial Pilot Certificate with Instrument Rating and credit or concurrent enrollment in AVI 220. F S
AVI 280 Multiengine Land
0.5 -1-1
Instruction and supervised training for commercial pilots to develop skills required for the Multi-Engine Rating. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in AVI 209. F S Su
AVI 281 Cockpit Resource Management
3 -1-3
Examines societal/cultural, industry, governmental regulatory agency, organizational, group, and individual influences on cockpit behavior and cockpit resource management. Laboratory and flight sections use multi-engine flight simulators and multi-engine aircraft. Students gain experience flying preplanned scenarios in both aircraft and simulators. Prerequisite: AVI 280. F S

Building Construction and Repair
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
BGM 111 Concrete and Masonry
1-2-2
Instruction and demonstration in use of concrete and masonry hand tools. Concrete and masonry materials and proper placement methods. F

Biology
Natural Sciences
217/351-2285 • www.parkland.edu/ns
BIO 100 Introduction to Biology
2-2-3
Basic introduction to biology, including scientific method, chemistry, cell structure and function, DNA and RNA, heredity, cell division, diversity and evolution of life, organ systems, reproduction, biotechnology, and the environment. Designed for those with limited biology course experience who plan to enroll in BIO 101, BIO 104, BIO 106, BIO 107, or BIO 111. F S Su
BIO 101 General Biology
3-3-4
(IAI L1 900L) Survey of biology for students in A.A.S. and baccalaureate-oriented programs. General principles of biology with emphasis on cell biology, genetics, evolution, animal and plant structure and function, taxonomy, ecology, and animal behavior. Credit not given for both BIO 101 and BIO 141-142 sequence. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
BIO 104 Environmental Biology
3-3-4
(IAI L1 905L) Examines relationship of humans to their environment, including consideration of natural cycles and balances, populations, energy, hazardous chemicals, air, water, noise, and solid waste pollution. Field trips included. Students are expected to provide own transportation on local field trips. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
BIO 105 Human Biology
3-3-4
(IAI L1 904L) Provides non-science majors with the fundamental principles of human biology in the context of current social issues. An emphasis on the human body and its interconnectedness to health, disease, growth, development, genetics, and evolution, as they relate to individuals and society. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
BIO 106 Heredity and Society
3-0-3
(IAI L1 906) Provides non-science majors with fundamentals of genetics and interrelationships between heredity and society. Includes exploration of inheritance, genetic technology, and population genetics. Must be taken with BIO 186 to fulfill life science general education lab requirement. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
BIO 107 Introduction to Evolution
3-3-4
(IAI L1907L) Topics include the philosophy of science, molecular bases of genetic variation, inheritance, speciation, geological and astronomical bases of biological evolution, history of evolutionary thought, origin of life, and application of evolution on modern society. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
BIO 109 Introduction to Plant Biology
3-3-4
(IAI L1 901L) Introduction to the diversity, structure and function, and importance of plant life to ecological and human systems. Emphasis on scientific inquiry of real-world problems involving plant anatomy and growth, responsiveness, evolution, reproduction, economics, and symbiosis of plants. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
BIO 111 Basic Anatomy and Physiology
3-3-4
Survey of structure and function of the human body. Recommended for students enrolled in the Personal Training Certificate or the Human Services programs or as prerequisite for Massage Therapy. May also be used by students with limited biology background who plan to enroll in BIO 121-122. May not be used as an elective in a program that requires BIO 121-122. F S Su
BIO 120 Fundamentals of Nutrition
3-0-3
Examines food sources and the functions of nutrients, principles of weight management, nutrition requirements during the life cycle, and the relationship between nutrition and health. Stresses practical application of nutrition concepts and explores current nutrition controversies. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
BIO 121 Anatomy and Physiology I
3-3-4
(IAI L1 904L) Structure and function of the human body, including chemistry review, fluid/electrolyte/pH balance, biochemistry/metabolism, cell biology, histology, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Cat anatomy for VTT students in lieu of human anatomy. High school or college biology helpful. Prerequisite: Successful completion of high school chemistry, CHE 100, or CHE 106 within the past three years; or satisfactory score on Parkland's chemistry competency test and ENG 101 placement. F S Su
BIO 122 Anatomy and Physiology II
3-3-4
Continuation of BIO 121 to complete the sequence in anatomy and physiology. Systems/processes covered include special senses, endocrine, circulatory, immune/defense mechanisms, integumentary, respiratory, digestive/metabolism, urinary, reproductive, and human development. Cat anatomy for VTT students in lieu of human anatomy. Prerequisite: BIO 121 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher. F S Su
BIO 123 Microbiology
3-3-4
Basic principles of microbiology; classification, morphological and physiological characteristics of microorganisms, microbial control, pathogenesis and immunity, with associated laboratory assignments. Prerequisite: BIO 101 or BIO 121 or BIO 141 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher. F S Su
BIO 141 Principles of Biology I
4-3-5
(IAI L1 900L, BIO 910) Survey of biology for students concentrating in life science or in a preprofessional health program. General principles of biology with emphasis on cell biology. Includes bioenergetics, molecular biology, genetics, and development. Credit not given for both BIO 101 and BIO 141-142 sequence. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement, high school chemistry or CHE 100 or equivalent. F S
BIO 142 Principles of Biology II
4-3-5
(IAI BIO 910) Continuation of BIO 141 to complete biology sequence; evolution, diversity of life, structure, and function of animals and plants. Credit not given for both BIO 101 and BIO 141-142 sequences. Prerequisite: BIO 141 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher. F S
BIO 160 Cat Anatomy I
0-3-1
Cat anatomy for VTT students with no prior experience: external anatomy, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system. F
BIO 161 Cat Anatomy II
0-3-1
Continuation of BIO 160: special senses, circulatory, respiratory, endocrine, renal and reproductive systems, and gastrointestinal tract. Prerequisite: BIO 160 or equivalent. S
BIO 162 Human Cadaver Anatomy I
0-3-1
Histology and human cadaver anatomy: histology, skeletal, muscular systems, and nervous systems. Designed for health program students who have already completed an anatomy and physiology course equivalent to BIO 121 but who have not had human cadaver lab. Prerequisite: approval of department chair. F S Su
BIO 163 Human Cadaver Anatomy II
0-3-1
Continuation of BIO 162: sense organs, endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, gastrointestinal tract, renal, and reproductive systems will be covered. Designed for health program students who have completed an anatomy and physiology course equivalent to BIO 122 but not had human cadaver lab. Prerequisite: approval of department chair. F S Su
BIO 166 Microbiology Laboratory Principles
0-3-1
Directed laboratory experience designed to enhance general microbiological laboratory skills. Prerequisite: approval of department chair. F S Su
BIO 186 Heredity and Society Laboratory
0-2-1
(IAI L1 906L) Laboratory course to accompany BIO 106 to satisfy general education requirements. Fundamentals of genetics, including human inheritance, population, genetics, and DNA. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in BIO 106. F S Su
BIO 225 Pathophysiology
3-0-3
Physiological basis of various conditions in altered health. Focuses on deviation from the normal homeostatic condition. Prerequisites: BIO 111 or BIO 121 and BIO 122 or equivalent with grade C or higher. S

Bricklayer
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
BLA 111 Construction Bricklayer Apprentice I
3-2-4
Fundamentals of bricklaying to supplement on-the-job training for first-year apprentices. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Bricklayers Apprenticeship school. F S
BLA 112 Construction Bricklayer Apprentice II
3-2-4
Fundamental skills essential for apprentice bricklayer including trade mathematics, safety, first aid, blueprint reading, sketching, and stone work. Prerequisite: BLA 111. F S
BLA 113 Construction Bricklayer Apprentice III
3-2-4
Essential skills including trade math, safety, first aid, blueprint reading, sketching, stone work, brick work, and welding. Prerequisite: BLA 112. F S
BLA 114 Construction Bricklayer Apprentice IV
3-2-4
Fundamental skills and information including mathematics, safety, first aid, blueprint reading, sketching, stone work, brick work, and welding trade. Prerequisite: BLA 113. F S
BLA 211 Construction Bricklayer Apprentice V
3-2-4
Fundamental skills including trade mathematics, safety, first aid, blueprint reading, sketching, stone work, brick work, and welding as outlined by the Joint Apprenticeship and Masonry Promotional Trust. Prerequisite: BLA 114. F S
BLA 212 Construction Bricklayer Apprentice VI
3-2-4
Advanced skills as outlined by the Joint Apprentice and Masonry Promotional Trust (JA-AMPT). Prerequisite: BLA 211. F S
BLA 213 Construction Bricklayer Apprentice VII
3-2-4
Advanced skills as outlined by Joint Apprentice and Masonry Promotional Trust (JA-AMPT). Prerequisite: BLA 212. F S
BLA 214 Construction Bricklayer Apprentice VIII
3-2-4
Advanced skills as outlined by Joint Apprentice and Masonry Promotional Trust (JA-AMPT). Prerequisite: BLA 213. F S

Business
Business and Agri-Industries
217/351-2213 • www.parkland.edu/bai
BUS 101 Introduction to Business
3-0-3
(IAI BUS 911) Survey of areas of business, including marketing, management, and finance for both business and non-business students. Provides opportunity to explore the total business environment and its related careers. F S Su
BUS 106 Business and Organizational Ethics
3-0-3
Introduction to social and ethical issues of business, institutions, and organizations including but not limited to government regulations, consumerism, advertising, client relationships, employee and organizational responsibility, preferential hiring, conflicts of interest, and economic justice. Credit not given for both BUS 106 and PHI 106. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
BUS 117 Introduction to Entrepreneurship
3-0-3
Designed for all owners, managers, and employees of existing or proposed small or independent businesses, including nonprofit organizations. Fundamentals of entrepreneurship and small business management; emphasis on organizational, financial, and marketing management. Main activities will be business planning, investigation of information sources, and keys to business success. F
BUS 131 Personal Finance
3-0-3
Overview of financial planning. In-depth study of investments and asset management relating to insurance, retirement, financial, and tax planning. Stocks, bonds, mutual funds, IRAs, real estate, collectibles, and other investments. F
BUS 133 Introduction to Public Pension Systems
3 - -3
Pension history, theory, organizational structures, and accounting principles for state of Illinois public pension systems. Emphasis on specific policies and procedures of State Universities Retirement System.
BUS 152 Introduction to Global Business
3-0-3
Entry-level overview of current world trade activities, practices, and issues. Designed to provide student with basic, practical understanding of global business operations in the context of global competitiveness and emerging trading blocks. F
BUS 204 The Legal Environment of Business
3-0-3
Public law and legal environment in which business must operate; background of legal principles and systems. Examines major laws affecting commerce, competition, labor relations, product liability, and consumer protection; contracts, agency, principles of tort, methods of organizing a business, sole proprietorship, corporations, partnerships. F S
BUS 205 Principles of Business Law
3-0-3
Law as it affects business. Examines requirements for contracts, principles of torts and crimes, concepts of property, and disposition of property at death; commercial paper and banking, products liability and warranties, debtor and creditor rights, security devices, and bankruptcy. F S
BUS 217 Advanced Entrepreneurship
3-0-3
Focuses on entrepreneurship and small business management building upon BUS 117. Emphasis on innovation, creativity, and strategies for long-term business success. Main activities include developing a business plan and investigating financing, from loans to venture capital. Prerequisite: BUS 117. S
BUS 245 Business Communications
3-0-3
Study of communication foundations; writing process for business letters, memos, and reports; oral presentation skills; team-building skills. Students will use e-mail and the Internet. Working knowledge of PowerPoint necessary. Prerequisite: ENG 102. F S Su
BUS 250 Business Work Experience I
0-20-4
Students obtain 300 hours of work experience to utilize their studies, expand their perception of work environment, and gain practical experience. Prerequisite: completion of at least 30 semester hours of college credit within program area in which placement is desired. F S Su
BUS 252 Business Work Experience II
0-20-4
Students obtain 300 hours of work experience in job environment that expands experiences gained from BUS 250. Training experiences developed by the employer and faculty member. Prerequisite: BUS 250. F S Su
BUS 264 Introduction to Finance
3-0-3
Introductory course in managerial finance: financial analysis, budgeting, sources of capital (short- and long-term), and cost of capital. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in ACC 102. F S

Computer-Aided Drafting
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
CAD 113 Computer-Aided Machine Design I
4-0-4
Design process with practical and computer-aided evaluation of power transmission devices, including gears, shafts, belts, chains, and other components using SolidWorks software. F S
CAD 117 Advanced AutoCAD --- 3D Topics
3-0-3
Advanced techniques in computer-aided drafting: 3D design, show motion, libraries, symbols libraries, scripts, and 3D panel/button customization for AutoCAD. Prerequisite: CAD 124 or equivalent. F S
CAD 121 Materials for Industry
3-0-3
(IAI MTM 912) Survey of materials used by design engineers; ferrous metals, nonferrous metals, plastics, and ceramics; testing, heat-treating, finishing, and use of adhesives. S
CAD 122 Computer-Aided Machine Design II
4-0-4
Theory and application of design processes including dimensions, tolerances, assembly, multi-view, and details. Also includes application of the design process to CAD drawings and solid models using SolidWorks software. Prerequisite: CAD 113 or approval of instructor or department chair. F S
CAD 124 Introduction to AutoCAD (Computer-Aided Drafting)
3-0-3
(IAI MTM 911) Introduction to computer-aided drafting using AutoCAD software; architectural, mechanical, and electrical applications. F S Su
CAD 132 Introduction to Microstation CAD
3-0-3
Introduction in computer-aided drafting using Microstation software applied to drawings for structural steel, concrete foundations, and site plans. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in CIT 130. F
CAD 214 Introduction to Revit Architecture
3-0-3
Use of Revit Architecture to assemble 3D commercial architectural plans, with an introduction to building information modeling. Prerequisites: CAD 124 and CIT 130. S
CAD 232 Advanced Microstation CAD
3-0-3
Advanced techniques in computer-aided drafting using Microstation and Geopak civil/survey software. Includes plat preparation, highway alignments, surface modeling and electronic survey data processing. Prerequisites: CAD 132 and CIT 130. S

Carpentry
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
CCA 111 Orientation to Carpentry
4-6-6
Introduces new apprentices to the industry, hand tools, power tools, power actuated tools, and blueprint reading.
CCA 112 Occupational Safety and Health
.5-1.5-1
Occupational Safety and Health Act 29 CFR 1926, common causes of accidents and fatalities in industry. Students practice applications of standards.
CCA 113 Scaffolding
1-2-2
Specific procedures for erecting frame scaffolds, tube and clamp scaffolds, and system scaffolds, emphasis on OSHA safety regulations. Prerequisites: CCA 111, CCA 112, and current First Aid and CPR card.
CCA 114 Concrete I
1-2-2
Working knowledge of surveying for carpenters. Emphasizes location, layout and basic operation of the builder's level. Theory and application of concrete form systems. Materials used in concrete applications. Prerequisites: CCA 111, CCA 112, and CCA 113.
CCA 115 Interior Systems I
2-2-3
Theory and application of interior systems used in drywall industry, including layout, light gauge metal framing, types of drywall, alternative building materials, solid metal and knock-down door frames.
CCA 116 Interior Systems II
1-2-2
Basic theory, layout, and installation of acoustical and soffit construction.
CCA 117 Residential Framing
1-6-3
Various arrangements, fabricating techniques, selection of materials and equipment to construct floor systems, wall systems, and roof truss systems. Structure, harvesting, identification, and the many uses of wood in construction. Prerequisite: CCA 115.
CCA 118 Interior Trim
1-2-2
Installation of interior wood doors, door and window casings, base shoe, chair rail, and crown molding. Includes proper selection and use of trim tools. Prerequisites: CCA 116 and CCA 117.
CCA 119 Exterior Trim
1-6-3
Basic theory, layout, and installation of aluminum soffit and siding, wood and shingle roof applications, windows and their components. Prerequisites: CCA 116 and CCA 117.
CCA 212 Stairs
1-2-2
Basic theory, calculations, code requirements, safety, proper layout, cutting, and assembly of stairs including open, closed, direction changes, and three step winder. Prerequisites: CCA 118 and CCA 119.
CCA 213 Roof Framing
1-6-3
Basic theory, calculations, and proper layout practices for gable, hip, valley, and jack rafters. Prerequisites: CCA 111 and CCA 212.
CCA 214 Concrete II
1-6-3
Theory and concepts of construction of bridges, stairs, and overhead concrete form systems. Prerequisites: CCA 111 and CCA 212.
CCA 215 Interior Systems III
1-3-2
Theory and installation of computer floors, lath and plaster systems, and fire stop materials. Prerequisites: CCA 213 and CCA 214.
CCA 217 Cabinets/Hardware
1-2-2
Theory and application of installation of cabinets and countertops, various types of hardware including locksets, door closers, and exit devices. Prerequisite: CCA 215.
CCA 218 Concrete III
1-2-2
Theory and application of equipment used for field layout. Transfer of data from field drawings to the Total Station in the field for layout tasks. Theory and concepts of advanced concrete finishing. Prerequisite CCA 114.

Customized Career Preparation
Business and Agri-Industries
217/351-2213 • www.parkland.edu/bai
CCP 111 Customized Career Preparation Portfolio
1-2-2
For persons with specific career goals to determine career field requirements, document requirements already mastered, and formulate an educational plan to achieve mastery of remaining requirements through portfolio preparation. Approval of portfolio and related educational plan is required prior to Customized Career Preparation degree admission. Prerequisite: approval of department chair or dean of career programs.

Critical Comprehension Skills
Humanities
217/351-2217 • www.parkland.edu/hum
Reading Assessment Program
Students enrolling at Parkland must demonstrate college-level reading proficiency. Students may demonstrate reading proficiency by 1) their performance on Parkland's reading assessment test; 2) their ACT or SAT scores; or 3) successful completion (C or higher) of two reading intensive courses transferred from an accredited institution. (Contact the director of reading for questions about interpretation.) Students who do not demonstrate college-level reading proficiency are required to take one or more CCS courses. Students whose reading skills are assessed at a level below Parkland's admission requirement will be referred to other resources.
CCS 098 Critical Comprehension Skills I
3-0-3
Develops intermediate comprehension skills basic to successful academic reading. Students who earn a grade of D or lower in CCS 098 must repeat the course or must demonstrate a CCS 099 or higher reading level by retaking Parkland's reading assessment test. Prerequisite: placement. F S Su
CCS 099 Critical Comprehension Skills II
3-0-3
Develops reading skills basic to successful college-level work. Emphasizes essay analysis and reading efficiency; includes note taking (annotating) and critical thinking. Students who enroll in CCS 099 may concurrently enroll in college-level, reading-intensive courses. Students who earn a grade of D or lower must repeat the course or must demonstrate a college-level reading proficiency by retaking Parkland's reading assessment test. Prerequisite: CCS 098 with a grade of C or higher or placement. F S Su

Child Development
Social Sciences and Human Services
217/351-2229 • www.parkland.edu/sshs
CHD 105 Child Growth and Development
3-0-3
Theory and principles of development prenatal through adolescence with emphasis on early childhood; physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development according to Piaget, Erikson, Vygotsky, Skinner, and others; gender, family, culture, and societal contexts; implications for professional practice. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. F
CHD 115 Socialization and Guidance for the Young Child
2-0-2
Basic theory and influences on children's behavior with an emphasis on social-emotional development. Emphasizes strategies for promoting prosocial behavior in young children. S
CHD 122 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3-2-4
Study and analysis of preschool/primary educational programs and practices, including techniques/methods utilized in working with young children. Orientation to a variety of child-care settings. Observations in local facilities focus on the purpose and organization of each program. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. F
CHD 124 Program Planning for the Young Child
2-2-3
Total planning consistent with developmental needs of children from two to five years of age in child-care situations. Includes workshop experiences in creating teacher-made materials and use of such materials. S
CHD 125 Observation and Analysis of Behavior
2-2-3
In-depth study of young children by direct observation in an organized environment. Includes techniques of child study; case studies; anecdotal records; and diagnostic tools utilized. F
CHD 134 Caring for Infants and Toddlers
3-2-4
Development and needs of children under the age of three. Considers the infant in family, day-care home, and day-care center settings. S
CHD 201 Health, Safety, and Nutrition of the Young Child
3-0-3
Provides an overview of personal health of the individual and of children in group settings, including nutrition, health and safety issues, and skills for teaching these concepts to young children. S
CHD 216 Music and the Arts for the Young Child
2-0-2
Methods and planning of activities for aesthetic education for young children, with appropriate experiences in music and music appreciation, movement, drama, and art appreciation. F
CHD 217 Language and Literature for the Young Child
3-0-3
Overview of language skills and activities for encouraging language development in areas of listening, speaking, prewriting, and prereading. Children's literature is introduced; learn and practice skills for using books with children. F
CHD 218 Math and Science for the Young Child
2-0-2
Basic mathematics and science concepts are introduced, acquainting the student with skills and methods appropriate for use with young children. F
CHD 222 Assisting in the Child-Care Center
2-9-4
Students observe/participate in 135 hours in a early childhood program. Focus on observation, interaction, curriculum planning, guidance, and evaluation/reflection on own knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, CHD 105 or PSY 207, and CHD 115, CHD 122, CHD 124, CHD 125, ENG 101, and approval for placement. F S
CHD 223 Child, Family, and Community
3-0-3
Focuses on the child in the context of family and community. Includes issues of communication, diversity, professionalism, and social policy, and promotes awareness and effective use of community resources. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. F
CHD 242 The Exceptional Child
3-2-4
Introduces range of cognitive, physical, social, and emotional special needs in children; identification, intervention strategies, methods, and programs in various settings; applicable laws, requirements, and family issues. Prerequisites: CHD 105 or PSY 207, and ENG 099 or placement. S
CHD 250 Field Experience in the Child-Care Setting
2-15-5
Student participates for 200 hours as an intern in a child-care center; becomes acquainted with teaching and administrative procedures of the center. Prerequisites: CHD 222, CHD 216, CHD 217, CHD 218, ENG 102, sophomore standing, and approval for placement. F S
CHD 260 Administration of Day-Care Centers
3-0-3
Administrative duties in a child-care center; evaluation of child-care centers, development of leadership abilities, and utilization of community resources are emphasized. SE
CHD 272 Administration of the Family Day-Care Home
3-0-3
Knowledge and skills needed to run a family day-care home; setting up a day-care home, business management and administrative skills, child development principles as applicable to home day care, home and community, home and parents. FO

Chemistry
Natural Sciences
217/351-2285 • www.parkland.edu/ns
CHE 100 Introduction to Chemistry
3-1-3
Introduction to chemical concepts, including the metric system, moles, chemical composition, atomic structure, bonding, reactions, gases, and thermochemistry. Designed primarily for those with little or no high school chemistry who expect to continue with CHE 101-102. Prerequisite: MAT 071, MAT 081, MAT 095, or recent high school algebra with a grade of C or higher. F S Su
CHE 101 General Chemistry I
4-3-5
(IAI P1 902L, CHM 911, EGR 961) Introduces new concepts and broadens those learned previously; chemical names, formulas, and equations; types of reactions; stoichiometry; thermochemistry; atomic structure and bonding; behavior of gases, liquids, and solids; properties of solutions. Prerequisites: recent high school chemistry or CHE 100 with a grade of C or higher and MAT 086 or MAT 098 with a grade of C or higher. F S Su
CHE 102 General Chemistry II
4-3-5
(IAI CHM 912, EGR 962) Equilibrium reactions (gas, acid/base, solution); nuclear chemistry; electrochemistry; redox reactions, transition metal complexes; properties of metals and nonmetals; rates and mechanisms of reaction. Introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 101 with a grade of C or higher. F S Su
CHE 104 Chemistry of Everyday Life
3-3-4
(IAI P1 903L) Introduction to chemical concepts through application to common activities in everyday life and modern issues. One-semester survey for non-science majors. F S Su
CHE 106 Chemistry for the Health Professions
3-3-4
(IAI P1 902L) General principles and theories of chemistry and selected topics in organic and biochemistry. Topics are drawn from the health fields. CHE 106 is not intended to replace CHE 101. Prerequisite: MAT 060, MAT 094, or equivalent with a grade of C or higher. F S Su
CHE 107 Chemistry for the Health Professions II
3-3-4
Expanded coverage of the general principles of chemistry and selected topics in organic and biochemistry. Topics drawn from the health fields. CHE 107 is not intended to replace CHE 102. Prerequisite: CHE 106 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher. F S Su
CHE 203 Organic Chemistry I
3-0-3
(IAI CHM 913) Properties, preparations, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols. Mechanisms of reactions. Stereochemistry; infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHE 101 and CHE 102 (one year of general college chemistry) with a grade of C or higher in both. F S
CHE 204 Organic Chemistry Lab I
1-3-2
(IAI CHM 913) Introduction to laboratory techniques relevant to organic chemistry, including synthesis, extraction, separations, and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in CHE 203 or the equivalent. F S
CHE 205 Organic Chemistry II
3-0-3
(IAI CHM 914) Properties, preparations, reactions, reaction mechanisms for additional organic functional groups. Spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHE 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher. F S
CHE 206 Organic Chemistry Lab II
1-3-2
(IAI CHM 914) Continued exploration of laboratory techniques relevant to separation, purification, and identification of organic compounds, synthetic methods, and qualitative identification. Credit or concurrent enrollment in CHE 205 is recommended. Prerequisite: CHE 204 with a grade of C or higher. F S

Community Health Services
Health Professions
217/351-2224 • www.parkland.edu/hp
CHS 121 Contemporary Health
3-0-3
Examines health promotion and prevention in contemporary society with an emphasis on a healthy lifestyle for individuals and communities. Areas of study are based on the six dimensions of wellness: Physical, emotional, intellectual, social, spiritual, and environmental. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F Su
CHS 122 Introduction to Public Health
3-0-3
Introduction to the public health system, its practice, and how it correlates to community health: public health system's function and structure, the organizations that shape the system, and health promotion and illness prevention. Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Computer Information Systems
Computer Science and Information Technology
217/353-2099 • www.parkland.edu/csit
CIS 101 Introduction to Computers
3-0-3
Introduction to personal computer operation and software use; terminology, hardware and software fundamentals, word processing, electronic spreadsheets, databases, the Internet, and other practical applications. Student operates microcomputer and software packages. Keyboarding ability recommended. F S
CIS 112 Computing Essentials
3-2-4
Introduction to computer operation and software use; terminology, hardware and software fundamentals, word processing, electronic spreadsheets, databases, the Internet, microcomputer operating systems file management, networking fundamentals, programming, and logic. Advising and career choices are addressed. Keyboarding ability recommended.
CIS 122 Introduction to Computer Programming
3-2-4
Introduction to logic and fundamental programming concepts using a common computer language with emphasis on syntax and structure. Design tools such as structured flowcharts and pseudocode. For students in science, mathematics, or technical programs. Prerequisite: MAT 071, MAT 081, or MAT 095 or equivalent. F S Su
CIS 131 Presentation Graphics (MS PowerPoint)
2-0-2
Learn to use PowerPoint to produce professional-looking presentations. Includes presentation management, wizards, importing/exporting, outlining, graphing, integration, hyperlinks, drawing, clip art, and scanning. Credit not given for both CIS 131 and CTC 197 and CTC 198. Prerequisite: keyboarding ability. F S Su
CIS 134 Spreadsheet Applications (MS Excel)
3-0-3
Introduction to spreadsheets using Microsoft Excel; spreadsheet software for various business applications. Data entry, basic spreadsheet commands, worksheet design, formula development, macros, business charts, security and analysis tools. Prerequisite: keyboarding ability. F S Su
CIS 135 Word Processing I (MS Word)
4-0-4
Create, edit, save, print, manage, and merge documents in Microsoft Word. Create tables, headers, footers,macros, Quick Parts, and captions. Credit not given for both CIS 135 and CTC 171, CTC 172, CTC 173, and CTC 271. Prerequisite: keyboarding ability. F S Su
CIS 137 Basic PC Maintenance/OS Concepts
2-2-3
Introduction to microcomputer operating systems. File management, disk organization, memory resource management, system configuration, and disk maintenance. Everyday care and maintenance of your PC. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in CIS 101 or approval of department chair. F S Su
CIS 138 Database Applications (MS Access)
3-0-3
Introduction to database use and applications. Create files and business reports, including file design and maintenance, report generation, and advanced concepts. Credit not given for both CIS 138 and CTC 177, CTC 178, and CTC 179. Prerequisite: keyboarding ability. F S Su
CIS 151 Web Skills and Creating Web Pages
2-0-2
Introduction to basic services available on the Internet. Includes e-mail, search engines, locating and evaluating information, transferring files, bookmarks, social media, security/safety, basic XHTML coding, and beginning CSS to create web pages. Credit not given for both CIS 151 and CTC 133 + CTC 196. F S Su
CIS 152 Web Desgn I (XHTML/CSS /Drmwvr)
2-2-3
Basic skills for creating business-oriented websites with a review of HTML, XHTML, and CSS coding. Use of Dreamweaver and online resources for building websites. Credit not given for both CIS 152 and CTC 136 + CTC 137 + CTC 138. Prerequisite: CIS 151, equivalent experience, or approval of department chair. F S Su
CIS 156 Keyboarding I
3-0-3
Beginners develop touch typing skills on the computer keyboard; practice in typing letters and simple reports. Credit in this course cannot be used toward graduation requirements for office professional majors. F S Su
CIS 157 Keyboarding II
3-0-3
Development of computer keyboarding skill in order to rapidly and accurately produce business letters, memos, reports, and tables. Prerequisite: CIS 156 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
CIS 170 Office Professional Topics
3-0-3
Overview of office careers field. Workplace attitudes, ethics, and responsibilities. Development of competency in decision making, human relations, business ethics, and communications. F S
CIS 171 Document Preparation and Editing
2-2-3
Transcribing various types of business correspondence from dictated tapes. Strong emphasis on grammar and punctuation usage as well as extensive work in learning to proofread. Prerequisite: typing ability. F S
CIS 200 Business Computer Systems
2-2-3
(IAI BUS 902) Management information systems, systems analysis and design techniques, terminology, equipment, and applications. Hands-on experience with microcomputers including software packages (spreadsheets, database presentation, and word processing) for data analysis and business presentations. Prerequisite: MAT 086, MAT 098, or equivalent with grade of C or higher. F S Su
CIS 211 Visual Basic Programming
2-2-3
Write object-oriented programs to run in a Windows environment using recent release. Covers classes, objects, controls, events, methods, and properties; designing user interfaces and data validation; and accessing sequential and database files. Prerequisite: CIS 122 or approval of department chair. S
CIS 231 Systems Analysis, Design, and Admin
3-0-3
Analysis, design, administration, and documentation of information systems, including requirements modeling, data and process modeling, and human-computer interaction principles. S
CIS 235 Word Processing II (MS Word)
2-0-2
Microsoft Word advanced features: templates, graphics, columns, tables, charts, outlining, styles, and sorting/selecting records. Includes creation of fill-in forms, importing data, and working with shared documents. Prerequisite: CIS 135 with grade of C or higher. F S Su
CIS 270 Integrated Software Applications
3-0-3
Consolidate and apply skills to real life situations. Microsoft Office integration, web design software, desktop publishing, e-mail, and Internet. Prerequisites: CIS 134, CIS 135, and CIS 138 with grades of C or higher and knowledge of MS PowerPoint. S
CIS 297 Job Seminar
1-0-1
Assists students with locating, preparing for, and conducting job interviews; what to expect in the first job; career opportunities; structure of the data processing industry. Prerequisite: completion of at least 15 hours of concentration courses. F S Su
CIS 298 Work Experience
0-15-3
Students utilize their studies to expand their perception of the work environment and gain practical experience. Prerequisite: approval for placement. F S Su

Construction Design and Management
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
CIT 111 Construction Materials
2-3-3
Primary construction materials, their properties, and proper applications: concrete, asphalt, aggregates, masonry, wood, and steel. Prerequisite: MAT 060 or MAT 094. S
CIT 113 Basic Surveying
2-3-3
Fundamental surveying applications: construction layout, topographic mapping, leveling, distance measurement, angular measurement, computations, and instrument skills. Prerequisite: MAT 071 or MAT 081 or MAT 095 with a grade of C or higher. F S
CIT 114 Plumbing
2-2-3
Demonstration and hands-on training in installation of plumbing pipe, fixtures, and fittings; interpreting plumbing drawings and selection of proper materials. F S
CIT 115 Rough Carpentry
2-2-3
Carpentry hand and power tools. Measurement, layout, and framing methods required in residential construction. Exterior finish carpentry and shingling required in residential construction will be covered by building a structure. F S
CIT 130 Construction Plan Fundamentals
2-3-3
Fundamentals of construction plan interpretation, manual drafting techniques, and industry drafting standards. F S
CIT 132 Surveying Computations
3-2-4
Computational theories and processes relevant to surveying including coordinate geometry, horizontal and vertical alignments, earth volumes, error analysis and adjustment. Prerequisites: CIT 113 and MAT 134. F
CIT 135 Construction Practices and Sustainability
3-0-3
Basic building planning, construction materials, and methods, with emphasis on sustainable practices. Focus on residential and light commercial applications. Drawings, specifications and building codes. Plumbing, electrical, heating, and air conditioning systems and costs. Prerequisite: CIT 130. S
CIT 211 Construction Surveying
2-3-3
Construction layout methods for horizontal and vertical curves, underground pipe layout, building layout, and slope and grade stakes. Introduction to survey-grade GPS methods for construction applications. Prerequisites: CIT 113 and MAT 134. F
CIT 212 Commercial Facility Systems
2-3-3
Overview of the primary systems involved in commercial facility construction: site work, utilities, foundations, structural steel and concrete, exterior finishes, mechanical / electrical / plumbing systems, and interior finishes. Construction plan and specification interpretation, basic review of building code issues, site visits to local construction projects. Prerequisites: CIT 130 and sophomore standing in CIT program or approval of program director or department chair. F
CIT 213 Soil Mechanics
2-2-3
Elementary study of exploring, sampling, testing, and evaluating soil materials and their effects on foundations, subgrades, embankments, and construction practices. Prerequisites: CIT 111 and MAT 134. F
CIT 215 Construction Cost Estimating
4-0-4
Introduction to estimating construction costs using plans and specifications to develop material quantities and costs. Complete residential and commercial estimates prepared. Prerequisites: CIT 130, MAT 134, and sophomore standing in CIT program or approval of program director or department chair. S
CIT 216 Construction Contract Administration
3-0-3
Introduction to construction office practice to familiarize student with specifications for road, bridge, and building projects, contracts, project cost accounting, and critical path project scheduling. Prerequisite: sophomore standing in CIT program or approval of program director or department chair. S
CIT 230 Construction Field Experience
0-10-1; 0-20-2; 0-30-3; 0-40-4-
On-the-job work experience for students preparing for careers in the construction industry. Students are required to have temporary (or permanent) construction employment prior to enrolling in the course. Students must meet with a construction instructor prior to start. Repeatable 3 times. Prerequisites: successful completion of one semester of Construction Design and Management program and approval of program director or department chair. F S Su
CIT 233 Surveying Field Experience
0-10-1; 0-20-2-
On-the-job work experience for students preparing for careers in the surveying industry. Students are required to have temporary (or permanent) surveying employment prior to enrolling in the course. Students must meet with a surveying instructor prior to start. Repeatable 3 times. Prerequisites: CIT 113, CIT 130, CIT 234, CAD 124, or approval of program director or department chair. F S Su
CIT 234 Design Surveying
2-3-3
Survey processes and theories for civil engineering projects, topographic surveys, as-built surveys, route surveys, and related computations. Prerequisites: CIT 113 and MAT 134. S
CIT 235 Control Surveying
2-3-3
Survey processes and theories of control surveying, geodesy, state plane coordinate systems, photogrammetry, and related computations. Prerequisites: CIT 113 and MAT 134. S
CIT 236 Site Development
2-3-3
Overview of design and construction processes in site development; earthwork, utilities, paving, civil structures, and inspection. Plan and specification interpretation; site visits to local projects. Prerequisites: CIT 130 and sophomore standing in CIT program or approval of program director or department chair. S
CIT 253 Legal Aspects of Surveying
2-3-3
Common and statute law; unwritten rights in land and their relationship to land surveys; survey standards; restoration of lost corners; rules of evidence and rights, duties and liability of the surveyor. Prerequisites: CIT 113 and MAT 134. S
CIT 254 Land Surveying
2-3-3
Survey process and theory of land surveying including development of the United States Rectangular System, boundary and retracement surveys, basic survey law, legal descriptions, title search, field monument search and related computations. Prerequisites: CIT 113 and MAT 134 and credit or concurrent enrollment in CIT 253. S
CIT 255 Engineering Surveying
3-3-4
Introduction to engineering surveying for civil engineering students. Prerequisites: MAT 125 and approval of program director or department chair. F S

Criminal Justice
Social Sciences and Human Services
217/351-2229 • www.parkland.edu/sshs
CJS 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
3-0-3
(IAI CRJ 901) History, development, philosophy, and constitutional aspects of criminal justice procedures and agencies. Interrelationship of various components and processes of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. F S
CJS 102 Police Administration and Operations
4-0-4
Proactive approach to police organizational management; traditional, scientific, participative, proactive, and other models; administration of a police organization; recruitment and selection of personnel, training policies, planning operations, auxiliary, and staff functions. Patrol function emphasized. Prerequisites: CJS 101 and ENG 101 placement. F S
CJS 104 Introduction to Corrections
3-0-3
Overview of the U.S. correctional system and its processes including its history, evolution of philosophy of sentencing, operation and administration, community corrections, and issues in correctional law.
CJS 127 Juvenile Delinquency
3-0-3
(IAI CRJ 914) Juvenile delinquency analyzed from both legal and sociocultural perspectives: juvenile courts, probation systems, and treatment-prevention facilities examined in relation to the legal processing of delinquents; emphasis placed on sociopsychological variables associated with determinants of delinquency. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. F S
CJS 203 Criminal Law
3-0-3
Fundamental doctrines of criminal responsibility; criteria for criminal acts; requisite mental state, criminal parties, causation and defenses, common law crimes; application of the Illinois Criminal Code. Prerequisites: CJS 101 and ENG 101 placement. F
CJS 204 Evidence and Procedure
3-0-3
Criminal procedure and evidence: bail, discovery, evidence, exclusionary rules, aspects of the criminal process prior to trial. Right to counsel, arrest, search, interrogation, lineups, and other police practices. Prerequisites: CJS 101 and ENG 101 placement. S
CJS 207 Traffic Law Enforcement and Administration
3-0-3
Development, purpose, enforcement, and administration of traffic law; elements of highway transportation system. Prerequisites: CJS 101 and ENG 101 placement. F
CJS 209 Criminal Investigation
4-0-4
Theory and practice of investigations from scene to courtroom. Interviewing, interrogation, case preparation, criminalistic applications. Prerequisites: CJS 101 and ENG 101 placement. F S
CJS 218 Internship and Seminar
1-15-4
Off-campus work experience in an appropriate field. Written reports required along with regular meetings with the faculty member. The student will also do individual research and study in the student's field of interest as approved and directed by the faculty member. Open to criminal justice majors only. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, CJS 102, and 6 additional hours of CJS credit completed prior to enrollment. Students must carry health insurance and pass a criminal background check prior to enrolling in CJS 218. F S
CJS 221 Community Policing and Problem Solving
3-0-3
Examines the history and evolution of community policing coupled with the concept of proactive problem-oriented policing versus reactive incident-driven policing, ensuring that the student truly understands how the two work in tandem. F
CJS 225 Issues in Criminal Justice
3-0-3
Study of specific criminal justice topics and problems in contemporary American society. Emphasis on developing critical thinking skills as the student learns to analyze current problems and issues. Prerequisites: CJS 101 or approval of program director or department chair and ENG 101 placement. S
CJS 292 International Field Experience in Criminal Justice
1-6-3
Explores the role of criminal justice in other countries including police, judicial, and corrections. Examines differing governmental policies and cultural and economic diversity influences on criminal justice. Requires a supervised international field experience.

Case New Holland
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
CNH 112 Diesel Engine Theory and Overhaul
3-3-4
Complete disassembly and reassembly of CNH brand diesel engines using appropriate company service manuals; measuring for wear, machining and overhaul procedures common to a dealership; parts evaluation; failure analysis; application of theory of operation and construction; emphasis on returning unit to field service. F
CNH 114 Introduction to Fuel Systems
2-3-3
Principles of operation of mechanical fuel systems for CNH diesel engines, distributor pump style, in-line pump style, timing of pumps, hands-on laboratory practice including tune-up procedures, diagnosis, troubleshooting, adjustment use of diagnostic equipment. F
CNH 119 CNH Dealer Work Experience I
0-5-1
On-the-job work experience for students preparing for employment at a CaseIH, CaseCE or New Holland dealer. Students must meet with a diesel instructor prior to start. Prerequisites: CNH 112, CNH 114, CNH 131, CNH 214, CNH 231, and EST 114. Su
CNH 131 Introduction to CNH Machine Electrical
3-3-4
Theoretical and practical application of machine electrical. Theoretical and practical application of Ohm's Law including series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits. Application of starting and charging circuits and testing equipment. Repair of electrical circuits with an emphasis on proper repair techniques. F
CNH 132 CNH Precision Farming Systems
2-1-2
Theoretical and practical application of CNH precision farming systems as related to Ag and CE equipment: Global Positioning Satellite and Advanced Farming Systems, emphasis on software, product information, calibration and hardware functions. F
CNH 153 Service Department Operations
1-0-1
Broad overview of an Ag and/or CE dealership: focus on proper tool usage, proper diagnostic equipment usage, safety, and time management. F
CNH 155 Introduction to CNH Hydraulic Systems
2-3-3
Introduction to CNH hydraulics systems, open center, closed center, and pressure and flow compensating type systems. F
CNH 171 Introduction to CNH Powertrains
3-3-4
CNH drive trains and components of agricultural and construction equipment, clutch systems, transaxles, differentials, axles, emphasis on disassembly, reassembly and component identification. Prerequisites: CNH 112 and CNH 114. F
CNH 214 Advanced Diesel Fuel Systems
2-2-3
Principles of CNH computer-controlled diesel engines, emphasis on diagnosis and troubleshooting and understanding user interface with electronic engine software. Prerequisite: CNH 114. S
CNH 216 CNH Ag and CE Equipment Air Conditioning
3-1-3
Principles and theory of air conditioning systems used on CNH equipment; testing, diagnosis, and repair; certification for handling refrigerants and A/C servicing. Prerequisite: CNH 131. S
CNH 219 CNH Dealer Work Experience II
0-5-1
On-the-job work experience for students preparing for employment at a CaseIH, CaseCE or New Holland dealer. Students must meet with a diesel instructor prior to start. Prerequisites: CNH 155, CNH 214, CNH 231, CNH 255, and CNH 271. S
CNH 231 Advanced CNH Machine Electrical
3-1-3
CNH machine electrical schematic reading, troubleshooting, diagnosis, and repair of monitoring systems, instrumentation, and other specialized electronic and computer-controlled equipment on CNH machinery and heavy equipment. Prerequisite: CNH 131. S
CNH 255 Advanced CNH Hydraulic Systems
2-2-3
Hydraulic and hydrostatic systems used on CNH equipment; diagnosing and testing to solve system problems; interpretation of fluid hydraulic schematic and diagrams; electronic and computer-controlled systems. Prerequisite: CNH 155. S
CNH 256 CNH Ag and CE Equipment Functions
3-3-4
Setup, repair and operational field testing of new and used CNH agricultural and construction equipment, emphasis on harvesting, planting, and construction equipment. Prerequisites: CNH 112, CNH 119, CNH 214, and CNH 231. F
CNH 271 Advanced CNH Powertrains
2-3-3
Pressure and flow testing of powertrains used in CNH Ag and CE equipment. Calibration of transmissions. Theory and operation of final drives and shuttles. Prerequisites: CNH 171 and credit or concurrent enrollment in CNH 255. S
CNH 291 CNH Service Department Implementation
2-2-3
Simulation of a CNH service department including diagnostic work, disassembly work, repair work and assembly work on CNH equipment. Practice accurate and precise labor documentation. Prerequisites: CNH 155, CNH 171, CNH 216, CNH 231, and CNH 256. S

Mass Communication
Fine and Applied Arts
217/351-2392 • www.parkland.edu/faa
COM 101 Introduction to Mass Communication
3-0-3
(IAI MC 911) Provides an overview of the history, nature, functions, and responsibilities of the mass communication industries in a global environment with an emphasis on the media's role in American society. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
COM 103 Introduction to Public Speaking
3-0-3
(IAI C2 900) Practice and study in public speaking involving informative, persuasive, and problem solution situations and issues. Emphasis on speaker's critical thinking in relation to audience, topic, occasion, and self. ENG 101 and college level reading placement strongly recommended. F S Su
COM 105 Basic News Writing
3-0-3
(IAI MC 919) Introduction to news writing including the techniques of news gathering, reporting, and interviewing, the use of library and online database research methods, and other related skills. Students write basic stories under real time constraints. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or higher. F S
COM 106 Broadcast Writing
3-0-3
(IAI MC 922) Emphasizes writing for visual and audio presentations, including continuity, commercials, public service announcements, news, and special events. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. S
COM 120 Interpersonal Communication
3-0-3
Everyday interaction between individuals: self-concepts, perception, verbal and nonverbal codes, cultural expectations, and their effects on communication in family, classroom, work, and interracial settings. F S Su
COM 121 Introduction to Advertising
3-0-3
(IAI MC 912) Role of advertising in integrated marketing communication, consumer behavior, creative strategies, and types of media. Practical applications are integrated into the course. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
COM 122 Introduction to Public Relations
3-0-3
(IAI MC 913) Provides an overview of the practices, theories, ethics, issues, and problems of public relations. Practical applications are integrated into the course. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
COM 140 Voice and Diction
3-0-3
Basic factors of voice and speech sound production. Class study and analysis of variations in spoken English. Individual analysis and guided practice toward improvement of speech habits. F
COM 141 Basic Broadcast Announcing
2-2-3
(IAI MC 918) Broadcast announcing principles and techniques; creating, reading, and delivering commercials, public service announcements, news, and interviews. Participation in promotional events. Introduction to production using Adobe Audition. Practical applications at WPCD, Parkland's 10,500-watt FM radio station. F S
COM 142 Introduction to Radio Production
2-2-3
(IAI MC 915) Audio production techniques and equipment operation; terminology, basic script writing, editing and producing commercials, public service announcements, and newscasting in a studio setting. Advanced use of Adobe Audition. Prerequisite: COM 141. S
COM 144 Video Production I
2-2-3
(IAI MC 916) Introduction to video production in a multi-camera television studio including studio production techniques, video and audio equipment operation, crew positions and responsibilities, lighting, and scriptwriting. Students gain hands-on experience producing videos from concept through digital post-production. F
COM 145 Video Production II
2-2-3
Advanced video production with an emphasis on equipment, techniques, and approaches specific to digital field production, including non-linear digital editing in a post production lab. Students gain hands-on experience producing videos from concept through post-production. Prerequisite: COM 144. S
COM 150 Sports Broadcasting
0-1.5-1
Broadcast techniques and production for sports broadcasting. Producing, directing, performing, editing, interviewing, and study of supportive technologies with emphasis on sports announcing. Extensive field production of Parkland College sports events for audio distribution. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Credit or concurrent enrollment in COM 141 recommended. F S
COM 160 American Sign Language I
4-0-4
Introduction to American Sign Language as used by the hearing impaired. Manual alphabet and introduction of common individual signs. F S Su
COM 181 Communication Practicum
1-1-1
Forensics competition, community communication situations, and/or research projects in the areas of communication. Students prepare speeches and readings for a variety of events. Repeatable for a maximum of 4 credit hours. F S
COM 200 Principles of Group Discussion
3-0-3
Theory and techniques of discussion and problem-solving applied to small group situations to prepare students for working in groups and teams in their careers. Includes small group theory, relationships, problem-solving, research methods, leadership, and conflict resolution. F S
COM 201 Mass Media and Society
3-0-3
Analysis and critical examination of the role of mass media in society with a focus on the developments, impact, and influence of new media technologies on politics, economics, and culture. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in ENG 102. S
COM 205 Business and Professional Communication
3-0-3
Theory and practice of workplace oral, written and mediated communication. Presentations include interviewing, briefing/training, persuasion, and group problem solving. Analysis of organizational communication, barrier removal, listening, and leadership. Prerequisite: COM 103 or approval of program director or department chair. S
COM 292 Internship and Seminar
1-12-3
Supervised work experience in approved business or nonprofit organization. Weekly discussions emphasize work ethics. Prerequisites: sophomore standing in Media Arts and Production, Broadcast Technology, Photography, or Graphic Design, and approval of instructor or department chair. F S
COM 293 Portfolio Seminar
2-2-3
Students fine-tune and edit their portfolio; outline a promotional campaign including Internet presence; and develop resumes. Includes lectures on professionalism and presentation skills, demonstration of portfolio production, seminars with industry professionals, and faculty reviews of final portfolio. Prerequisite: sophomore standing and permission of program director or department chair. S

Computer Science
Computer Science and Information Technology
217/353-2099 • www.parkland.edu/csit
CSC 105 Appl of Computers in Busn/Commerce
4-0-4
Introduction to computers; hands-on experience with Windows, spreadsheet, database, and introduction to programming. Prerequisite: MAT 071, MAT 081, MAT 095, or equivalent with grade of C or higher. F S Su
CSC 115 Networking I - Routers and Switches
2-2-3
Hands-on coverage of router and switch configuration, Cisco IOS, routing protocols, VLANs, and access lists. CSC 115 and CSC 116 prepare the student to take the Cisco Certified Network Associate Exam (CCNA). Prerequisite: CSC 130 with a grade of C or higher, or approval of department chair. F S
CSC 116 Networking II - WAN Connectivity
2-2-3
In-depth, hands-on coverage of router configuration for Wide Area Networking (WAN), Async, PPP, ISDN, frame relay, and the OSPF and EIGRP routing protocols. CSC 115 and CSC 116 prepare the student to take the Cisco Certified Network Associate Exam (CCNA). Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in CSC 115. F S
CSC 121 Web Design II
2-2-3
(IAI MC 923) Create websites, graphics, and animations. Focus on navigation, user interface design, information architecture, and creation of artwork for the Internet. Emphasis on web standards and becoming advanced users of web authoring software. Credit not given for both CSC 121 and CTC 151 + CTC 152 + CTC 153. Prerequisite: CIS 152. F S
CSC 123 Computer Science I (C/C++)
3-2-4
(IAI CS 911) Introductory topics in computer science, intended for Computer Science and related majors. Emphasis on algorithms, program structure, data types, decision statements, strings, looping, functions, files, classes, objects, and documentation. Prerequisites: MAT 086 or MAT 098, and CIS 122 or approval of department chair. F S Su
CSC 125 Computer Science II (C++)
2-2-3
(IAI CS 912) Advanced topics in computer science, C++ object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures, and development of a larger-scale program. Prerequisite: CSC 123 with a grade of C or higher, or an equivalent C programming language course. F S Su
CSC 127 Introduction to Computing (Programming in C) with Engineering Applications
2-2-3
(IAI EGR 922, MTH 922) Fundamental principles, concepts, and methods of computing with emphasis on applications in the physical sciences and engineering. Basic problem solving and programming techniques, fundamental algorithms and data structures, use of computers in solving engineering and scientific problems. Course taught using C language. CIS 122 or equivalent programming experience recommended. Prerequisite: MAT 128. F
CSC 128 Introduction to Linux
2-2-3
Comprehensive study of Linux user commands and utilities. History of Linux/UNIX and open source software, Linux file system structure, GNU utilities and commands, secure inter-system communications, text processing, vi editor, bash shell, shell scripting. Hands-on instruction. Prerequisite: MAT 071, MAT 081, or MAT 095. F S Su
CSC 130 Introduction to Computer Networks
2-2-3
Introduction to local area networks, wide area networks, and the Internet; including hardware, software, terminology, components, design, connections of a network, and topologies and protocols for LANs. Listed objectives for CompTIA Network+ Certification Exam. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in CSC 133. F S Su
CSC 133 PC Hardware and OS Maintenance
3-2-4
Technical emphasis; operating systems most commonly used on IBM compatible computers; MS Windows; issues related to computer networks and computer architecture. Listed objectives for CompTIA A+ Essentials Certification Exams covered in general. Prerequisite: CIS 137. F S Su
CSC 140 Computer Science I (Java)
2-2-3
Introduction to computer science and programming using the Java language. Emphasis on problem solving, algorithm design, and program development including data representation, programming constructs, and object-oriented design fundamentals. Prerequisites: CIS 122 and MAT 086 or MAT 098, or approval of department chair. F
CSC 150 Wireless Networking & Emerging Technologies
2-2-3
Wireless networking standards and practice, including RF fundamentals and spread spectrum, the 802.11 family of standards, site surveys, hardware installation, troubleshooting, and security fundamentals. Lab component. Prerequisite: CSC 130 or equivalent experience or approval of department chair. F S
CSC 151 MS OS Workstation
2-2-3
Manage Windows workstation including networking, operating system, installation, file system, profiles and policies, security, protocols, internetworking, remote access, printing, and troubleshooting. Listed objectives for Microsoft Windows Workstation Certification Exam covered. Prerequisite: CSC 133 or approval of department chair. F S
CSC 153 MS OS Server
2-3-3
Configure, customize, and troubleshoot Microsoft Network Operating Systems in a single-domain environment. Designing, managing, and deploying DNS, Active Directory Services, sites, trust relationships, group policies, and certificate services. Listed objectives for Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist Exam (MCTS) covered. Prerequisite: CSC 151 or approval of department chair. F S
CSC 155 CGI with Perl
2-2-3
Introduction to Perl programming language, CGI, SQL database, UNIX, scripting, and using Perl to produce server-side web pages and networked applications. Prerequisites: CSC 123 or CSC 140, CSC 128, and basic knowledge of HTML. F S
CSC 159 MS Network Administrator
2-2-3
Planning, deploying, managing, and monitoring a Microsoft Server Environment. Patch, policy, administrative delegation, backup configuration and deployment decisions. Planning a business environment for continuity and high availability. Major listed objectives for Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist Exam (MCTS) covered. Prerequisite: CSC 153 or approval of department chair. F
CSC 171 Linux Installation and Administration
2-2-3
Fundamental Linux system administration, including X-windowing systems, environment variables, user and group administration, file systems, booting and partitioning, umask and quotas, process management, libraries common to all flavors of Linux. Prerequisite: CSC 128 with a grade of C or higher. F
CSC 175 Scripting
2-2-3
Creation of HTML documents and scripts using various scripting languages. Prerequisite: CIS 152 or department chair approval. F S Su
CSC 176 Database Theory
3-0-3
Entity relationship model, normalization, database design and methodology, SQL, security, and transaction management. Prior programming experience recommended. F S
CSC 177 Active Server Pages (ASP)
2-2-3
Client-server relationships; application, database, request, response, server and session objects, .NET framework, ad rotators, input validators, datagrids, SQL server connections, custom components, introduction to C# object oriented design, Dreamweaver. Prerequisite: CSC 123, CSC 175, or approval of department chair. F
CSC 179 Digital Media Foundation
2-2-3
Introduction to foundational concepts, processes, applications, theory, and technology behind the digital media industry. Projects focus on fundamental techniques and processes in the digital media production pipeline. Prerequisite: MAT 071, MAT 081, or MAT 095. F S Su
CSC 186 2D Animation
3-2-4
(IAI MC 924) Introduction to concepts, processes, and history of animation. Emphasis on concepts, storytelling, and principles of motion design. Projects will focus on creating traditional as well as computer assisted animations for digital media using Flash and AfterEffects. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in CSC 179 or approval of department chair. F S
CSC 187 3D Computer Animation I
3-2-4
Introduction to the technical and visual design of 3D computer-generated imagery. Fundamentals in 3D modeling, lighting, shading, texturing, and rendering. Prerequisites: credit or concurrent enrollment in CSC 179, background in design, and experience in Windows or approval of department chair. F S
CSC 188 3D Computer Animation II
3-2-4
Principles of animation and cinematography in a 3D digital environment. Animation fundamentals in motion curves, keyframing, reactive animation, and deformations. Cinematic techniques in live-action compositing, lighting, camera composition, and story development. Prerequisite: CSC 187. F S
CSC 189 3D Computer Animation III
3-2-4
Character development and animation in a 3D digital environment. Fundamentals in character design, modeling, texturing, skeletons, kinematics, rigging, motion capture, and character performance. Prerequisite: CSC 188. F S
CSC 191 SQL
3-2-4
Comprehensive coverage of Structured Query Language including data retrieval and manipulation, sorts, joins, sub-queries, built-in functions, constraints, objects, transactions, and granting and revoking privileges. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in CSC 176 or approval of department chair. F
CSC 192 Database Administration
3-2-4
Comprehensive coverage of relational database architecture including instance, data dictionary views, dynamic performance views, control files, redo log files, diagnostic files, storage, table and index management, data integrity constraints, user and resource control, system and object privileges, and roles. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in CSC 176 or approval of department chair. F
CSC 195 Computer Forensics I
2-2-3
Basic concepts of digital forensics and their applications. Data capture, evidence protection, basic computer ethics, FTK, and open source analysis of software tools. Capture digital evidence and apply forensic techniques to evaluate data. Prerequisite: CSC 133 or approval of department chair. F
CSC 212 Mobile Application Development
3-2-4
Application development for Android mobile devices using Java within the Eclipse integrated development environment. General theory, background, and hands-on experience with principles of mobile software development. Prerequisite: CSC 125 or CSC 140. F S
CSC 220 Data Structures
2 -2 -3
(IAI CS 921) Complex data structures and algorithms including lists, searching and sorting, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, and memory management with emphasis on algorithm analysis. Prerequisite: CSC 123 with a grade of C or higher. S
CSC 230 Game Content Creation
3-2-4
Design and content creation for video games. Survey and critical study of history, design, production processes of game development assets. Hands-on skills, tools, and methods involved in the art and design of content creation for 3D video games. Prerequisite: CSC 187. F
CSC 231 Computer Graphics I
3-2-4
Fundamentals of 3D real-time graphics programming. General theory with hands-on programming projects and applications. Concepts include object representation, transformation and viewing, animation, selection, shading, texture mapping, and effects. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in CSC 125. F
CSC 232 Computer Graphics II
3-2-4
Advanced topics of 3D real-time graphics programming. Theory with hands-on programming projects and applications. Prerequisite: CSC 231. S
CSC 233 Animation Scripting
3-2-4
Scripting and programming fundamentals for 3D content and effects creation for digital media applications including gaming, film, and interactive applications. Procedural methods for 3D modeling, animation, shading, and visual effects using 3D animation scripting languages. Prerequisite: CSC 179. S
CSC 234 Game Design
3-2-4
Design and content creation for video games. Survey and critical study of history, design, and production processes of game development. Hands-on skills, tools, and methods involved in the art and design of 3D video games. Prerequisite: CSC 179. S
CSC 236 3D Computer Animation IV
3-2-4
Advanced topics in creating 3D computer-generated imagery and special visual effects, advanced rendering and shading methods, particle and paint effects, soft-bodies and dynamics, and advanced technologies. Prerequisite: CSC 187. F
CSC 239 Web Design III
2-3-3
Advanced website design with emphasis on creative visual communication. Create professional, dynamic, portfolio-quality websites that meet client objectives. Focus on client relationships, concepts, collaboration, craftsmanship, and portfolio building. Prerequisite: CSC 121. F
CSC 250 Computer Network Security
2-0-2
Scope of network security practitioner responsibility, security architecture models, security management practices, physical security, telecommunications security, access controls, monitoring, auditing, risk, response and recovery, cryptography, data communications security, and malicious code. Prerequisite: CSC 130 with a grade of C or higher. F
CSC 251 Advanced Topics in Computer Security
2-2-3
Advanced topics in securing local area networks, including operating system software, application and server software, and networked communications. Upon completion of course students should be prepared to pass Comp TIA Security+ test. Prerequisite: CSC 130 and CSC 153 or CSC 171. S
CSC 255 Topics in Web Programming
3-2-4
Tools necessary to design, create, and maintain a website: cookies, http server maintenance, internet security, e-commerce, database connectivity, PHP, Flash, Dreamweaver, XML, web services. Students will develop a functional website. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in CSC 155 or CSC 177. S
CSC 256 Computer Science II (Java)
2-2-3
Advanced topics in computer science, object oriented programming using Java, inheritance and polymorphism, linked list and tree data structures, stacks and queues, generic data types using good Object Oriented Design. Prerequisites: CSC 123 or CSC 140 with a grade of C or higher. S
CSC 271 Linux Networking and Security
2-3-3
Intermediate Linux networking and security systems management. Kernel configuration, runlevel configuration, networked printing, system documentation, shell scripting, logging and backup strategies, xinetd, firewalls, nfs, and Samba common to all flavors of Linux. Prerequisite: CSC 171 with a grade of C or higher. S
CSC 294 Computer Graphics Portfolio
0-15-3
Design and develop advanced individual or group portfolio projects. Includes development of 3D animated short films, 3D still imagery, gallery exhibit pieces. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credit hours. F S

Computer Technology Center
Computer Science and Information Technology
217/353-2099 • www.parkland.edu/csit
CTC 110 Beginning Computers
3-0-3
Introduction to entry level computer operation with emphasis on general understanding of terminology, hardware components, file management, and a general overview of Microsoft Office applications.
CTC 119 Microsoft Outlook
1-0-1
Introduction to Outlook, Microsoft's business and personal information management tool: email, address book, calendar, task, and the organization and management of electronic data.
CTC 130 Basic Keyboarding
1-0-1
Self-paced development of fundamental skills in the use of a computer keyboard.
CTC 132 Computer Basics I
1-0-1
Basic use of the computer, including the mouse, keyboard, storage devices, and files. Overview of basic computer concepts, word processing (Word, and PowerPoint. F S Su
CTC 133 Internet Basics
1 - -1
First in a sequence of two, one-hour courses that together are equivalent to CIS 151. Introduction to basic services available on the Internet. Includes e-mail, search engines, locating and evaluating information, transferring files, bookmarks, online communications, and security. F S Su
CTC 135 Keyboarding Skill Building
2-0-2
Increasing speed and accuracy in computer typewriting; develops and strengthens use of proper and efficient keyboarding techniques. Prerequisite: typing ability.
CTC 136 Web Page Coding Topics
1-0-1
File management, HTML, XHTML, and CSS syntax; internal and external style sheets; inline and custom classes; creating, editing, validating, and publishing websites compliment for W3C coding standards and accessibility guidelines. CTC 136 + CTC 137 + CTC 138 covers the same course content as CIS 152, Web Design I. Prerequisites: computer and Internet experience. F S Su
CTC 137 Dreamweaver I
1-0-1
Introduction to Dreamweaver, SFTP, formatting text, manipulating images, and adding links. Prerequisite: CTC 136. F S Su
CTC 138 Dreamweaver II
1-0-1
Intermediate Dreamweaver including tables, CSS layout, forms, and site optimization. Prerequisite: CTC 137. F S
CTC 139 Computer Basics II
1-0-1
Introduction to Microsoft Office Excel and Access.
CTC 150 Speech Recognition Applications
1-0-1
Introduction to speech recognition software; utilize speech recognition software to input data into the computer.
CTC 151 Dreamweaver III
1-0-1
Create and edit XHTML code, forms, object behaviors, layers, and optimize and validate Web pages with Dreamweaver software. Prerequisite: CIS 152 or CTC 138. F S Su
CTC 152 Flash I
1-0-1
Create two-dimensional drawings, animations, and special effects for Web pages using Macromedia Flash software. Prerequisite: CIS 152 or CTC 136. F S Su
CTC 153 Fireworks I
1-0-1
Create bitmap or vector graphics with dynamic effects for Web pages using Macromedia Fireworks. Prerequisite: CIS 152 or CTC 136. F S Su
CTC 155 Basic Computer Literacy
1-0-1
Introduction to Internet, file management, computer protection, Windows 8, and Windows settings and accessories.
CTC 157 Google Applications
1-0-1
Introduction to Gmail, Google Drive, Google Search Tools, Google Maps, Chrome Browser, and Blogger.
CTC 171 Word Processing Apps I
1-0-1
Introduction to word processing using Microsoft Word; word processing software for various types of business documents. Prerequisite: keyboarding ability. F S Su
CTC 172 Word Processing Apps II
1-0-1
Word processing using Microsoft Word; word processing software for more complex types of business documents. Prerequisite: CTC 171 or equivalent experience.
CTC 173 Word Processing Apps III
1-0-1
Word processing using Microsoft Word; word processing software for more complex types of business documents. Prerequisite: CTC 172 or equivalent experience.
CTC 174 Spreadsheet Apps I
1-0-1
Introduction to spreadsheets using Microsoft Excel; spreadsheet software for various business applications. No previous spreadsheet experience required.
CTC 175 Spreadsheets Apps II
1-0-1
Spreadsheets using Microsoft Excel; spreadsheet software for more complex business applications. Prerequisite: CTC 174 or equivalent experience.
CTC 176 Spreadsheet Apps III
1-0-1
Spreadsheets using Microsoft Excel; spreadsheet software for more complex business applications. Prerequisite: CTC 175 or equivalent experience.
CTC 177 Database Apps I
1-0-1
Introduction to database applications using Microsoft Access; database software to create tables, queries, and reports. No database experience required.
CTC 178 Database Apps II
1-0-1
Database applications using Microsoft Access; complex tables, queries, and reports. Prerequisite: CTC 177 or equivalent experience.
CTC 179 Database Apps III
1-0-1
Database applications using Microsoft Access; complex tables, queries, and reports. Prerequisite: CTC 178 or equivalent experience.
CTC 190 Introduction to Publisher
1-0-1
Introduction to basic skills needed to produce publications such as newsletters, brochures, calendars, and business cards using Microsoft Publisher.
CTC 193 Windows
1-0-1
Introduction to basic use of a Windows-based operating system.
CTC 196 Creating Web Pages Using XHTML
1-0-1
This course is a sequence of two, 1-hour courses that together would be equivalent to CIS 151. Includes file management, basic XHTML coding, and using templates to create web pages. F S Su
CTC 197 Presentation Apps I
1-0-1
Introduction to the use of Microsoft PowerPoint presentation software to produce professional-looking material.
CTC 198 Presentation Apps II
1-0-1
Advanced use of Microsoft PowerPoint software to enhance presentations with customized features.
CTC 271 Word Processing Apps IV
1-0-1
Word processing using Microsoft Word; word processing software for more complex types of business documents. Prerequisite: CTC 173 or equivalent experience.

Dental Hygiene
Health Professions
217/351-2224 • www.parkland.edu/hp
DHG 110 Applied Head and Neck Anatomy
2-0-2
Gross anatomy of head and neck with special emphasis on maxilla, mandible, and oral soft tissues. Interactions of neuromuscular mechanisms of teeth, supporting structures, and temporomandibular joint. Prerequisites: BIO 121, CHE 100 or equivalent, and admission into Dental Hygiene program. F
DHG 111 Oral and Dental Anatomy
1-2-2
Terms and anatomic structures of the oral cavity, including detailed study of crown and root morphology of both primary and permanent dentitions. Prerequisites: BIO 121, CHE 100 or equivalent, and admission into Dental Hygiene program. F
DHG 112 Dental Histology and Embryology
2-0-2
Introduction to development of human organism with emphasis on face, teeth, and supporting periodontal structures. Application of oral histology in assessing patient's oral health. Prerequisites: BIO 121, CHE 100 or equivalent, ENG 101 placement, and admission into dental hygiene program. F
DHG 113 Introduction to Prevention
1-0-1
Introduction to causes and prevention of dental caries and periodontal disease. Student learns to assess patient needs and to provide information for patient self-care. Prerequisites: BIO 121, CHE 100 or equivalent, and admission into Dental Hygiene program. F
DHG 114 Pre-Clinic
3-6-5
Introduction to dental hygiene profession with emphasis placed on periodontal debridement. Instrument skills proficiencies performed on student/patients. Prerequisites: BIO 121, CHE 100 or equivalent, ENG 101 placement, and admission into dental hygiene program. F
DHG 115 Seminar I
1-0-1
Continuation of topics related to patient treatment and patient management in DHG 116. Prerequisites: DHG 110, DHG 111, DHG 112, DHG 113, DHG 114, and BIO 122. S
DHG 116 Clinic I
.5-8-2
Continuation of preclinical skill development in the clinical setting treating patients; emphasis on calculus detection, patient rapport, oral hygiene instruction, applying consistent infection control, medical history data gathering, and developing recall systems. Prerequisites: DHG 110, DHG 111, DHG 112, DHG 113, DHG 114, and BIO 122. S
DHG 117 Dental Radiology I
2-3-3
Theory and procedures for exposing and developing various dental X-ray films; practical experience on mannequins and selected patients; identification, mounting, and general interpretation practiced. Infection control for radiographic equipment is emphasized. Prerequisites: DHG 110, DHG 111, DHG 112, DHG 113, DHG 114, and BIO 122. S
DHG 118 Pharmacology for the Dental Hygienist
2-0-2
Study of drugs, including their pharmacological effects, adverse reactions, indications, and contraindications as they relate to patient medical history and dental hygiene treatment. Prerequisites: DHG 110, DHG 111, DHG 112, DHG 113, DHG 114, and BIO 122. S
DHG 119 Alterations of Oral Structures
2-0-2
Study of alterations of basic biological processes as applied to the oral structures. Specific disease entities of local and systemic origin are studied. Prerequisites: DHG 110, DHG 111, DHG 112, DHG 113, DHG 114, and BIO 122. S
DHG 210 Periodontology
2-0-2
Histopathology, etiology, clinical features, and treatment of periodontal infections; emphasizes diagnosis, treatment planning, and management of periodontal patients. Incorporates periodontal case study project to foster the clinical application of course materials. Prerequisites: DHG 212, DHG 215, and DHG 216. F
DHG 211 Pain Management for the Dental Patient
1-1-1.5
Integration of patient pre-evaluation, pharmacology, recordkeeping, anatomy/neuroanatomy/physiology, techniques, complications, postoperative instructions and clinical experience in the administration of nitrous oxide and local anesthesia. Clinical sessions are included for students to develop competency in their administration. Prerequisites: DHG 118 and DHG 119. Su
DHG 212 Dental Materials
2-4-3
Study of materials utilized in dental office and laboratory. Infection control in the dental laboratory is emphasized. Prerequisites: DHG 115, DHG 116, DHG 117, DHG 118, DHG 119, BIO 123, and COM 103. Su
DHG 215 Clinic II
.5-6-2
Continuation of clinical skill development with emphasis on individualized oral hygiene instruction, medical history analysis, applying infection control, and patient assessment and analysis. Prerequisites: DHG 115, DHG 116, DHG 117, DHG 118, DHG 119, BIO 123, and COM 103. Su
DHG 216 Seminar II
1-0-1
Continuation of topics related to patient treatment and patient management in DHG 215. Prerequisites: DHG 115, DHG 116, DHG 117, DHG 118, DHG 119, BIO 123, and COM 103. Su
DHG 217 Seminar III
2-0-2
Provides information for the dental hygiene care of the medically compromised dental patient. Topics related to patient treatment in DHG 218. Prerequisites: DHG 212, DHG 215, and DHG 216. F
DHG 218 Clinic III
0.5-12-4-
Continuation of clinical skill development with emphasis on the application of concepts learned in DHG 212, DHG 210, and DHG 217. Prerequisites: DHG 212, DHG 215, and DHG 216. F
DHG 219 Clinic IV
0.5-12-4-
Continuation of clinical skill development with emphasis on periodontal maintenance/supportive maintenance and time motion management. Prerequisites: DHG 210, DHG 217, DHG 218, DHG 230, DHG 233, and ENG 101. S
DHG 230 Community Dental Health
2-3-3
Knowledge of public health system including community dental health. Dental health education program planning, including assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating grade school program. Critically analyze research article. Communicate technical dental health information. Prerequisites: DHG 212, DHG 215, and DHG 216. F
DHG 233 Dietary Analysis and Preventive Counseling
2-0-2
Study of role of diet upon building and maintaining of oral structures as applied to dental hygiene patient through analysis of total oral consumption and subsequent preventive recommendations. Prerequisites: DHG 212, DHG 215, and DHG 216. F
DHG 235 Seminar IV
1-0-1
Provides information related to credentialing, consumer issues, current dental hygiene issues, and management skills. Provides information on job interview techniques and developing a resume and cover letter. Prerequisites: DHG 210, DHG 217, DHG 218, DHG 230, DHG 233, and ENG 101. S
DHG 236 Ethics and Jurisprudence
1-0-1
Rules of conduct and behavior that guides a dentist's and dental hygienist's practice, ethical and legal behavior expected of a professional, political action and the importance of the relationship between professions and government are discussed. Prerequisites: DHG 210, DHG 217, DHG 218, DHG 230, DHG 233, and ENG 101. S
DHG 237 Licensure/Transition to RDH
1-0-1
The role of licensure in the dental hygiene profession. The processes, procedures, requirements, jurisdictions, and cost of becoming licensed to practice dental hygiene in the United States. Preparation for transition from student to licensed professional. Prerequisites: DHG 210, DHG 217, DHG 218, DHG 230, DHG 233, and ENG 101. S
DHG 238 Dental Radiology II
.5-0-.5
Continuation of dental radiology theory focusing on the development of interpretation skills of intraoral and extraoral radiographs. Prerequisites: DHG 116, DHG 117, DHG 215, and DHG 218.

Diesel Power Equipment Technology
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
DPE 110 Agricultural and Heavy Equipment Power Trains
2-4-4
Drive trains and components of agricultural machinery and construction/earth-moving equipment; special transmissions, clutch systems, transaxles, differentials, axles, and PTOs; troubleshooting, diagnosis, and repair. Prerequisite: DPE 251 or approval of instructor or department chair. F
DPE 130 Introduction to Diesel Electrical
3-3-4
Theoretical and practical application of Ohm's Law, series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits. Theoretical and practical application of starting and charging circuits. Repair of electrical circuits with an emphasis on proper repair techniques. Must have a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter). F
DPE 135 Introduction to Mobile Hydraulics
2-3-3
Introduction to mobile hydraulics systems, including open, closed, and PFC types.
DPE 151 Diesel Fuel Systems
2-3-3
Fuel systems for diesel engines; principles of operation for pump-style systems; timing of pumps; hands-on laboratory practice including diagnosis, troubleshooting, adjustment, and repair of fuel system components; use of diagnostic equipment. F
DPE 215 Diesel Work Experience I
0-10-2
On-the-job work experience for students in the diesel industry. Students are required to have tool set on internship. Students must meet with a diesel instructor prior to start. Prerequisites: DPE 151, DPE 230, DPE 234, DPE 239, DPE 251, or approval of diesel instructor or department chair. Su
DPE 217 Diesel Work Experience II
0-10-2
On-the-job work experience for students preparing for employment in the diesel industry. Students are required to have tool set on internship. Students must meet with a diesel instructor prior to start. Prerequisites: DPE 151, DPE 230, DPE 234, DPE 235, DPE 239, DPE 251, DPE 254, or approval of diesel instructor or department chair. S
DPE 230 Electronic Systems and Accessories
2-2-3
Installation, analysis, testing, programming, diagnosis, and repair of monitoring systems, instrumentation, and other specialized electronic and computer-controlled equipment on agricultural machinery and heavy equipment. Prerequisite: DPE 130 or approval of instructor or department chair. S
DPE 234 Vehicular Air Conditioning
2-2-3
Principles and theory of air conditioning systems; testing, diagnosis, and repair; certification for handling refrigerants and A/C servicing; laboratory experience of agricultural, heavy equipment and trucks; systems. Prerequisite: DPE 130 or approval of instructor or department chair. S
DPE 235 Advanced Hydraulics
2-1-2
Hydraulic systems of major power equipment; interpretation of fluid hydraulic schematic diagrams; electronic and computer-controlled systems; diagnosing and testing to solve system problems; teardown and repair of systems on agricultural and construction equipment. Prerequisite: DPE 135. S
DPE 236 Equipment Adjustment and Repair
2-4-4
Adjustment, maintenance, and repair of new and used agricultural machinery and/or construction equipment and operational field testing; use operator and service manuals to perform repairs. Prerequisites: DPE 215, DPE 230, DPE 239 and DPE 251. F
DPE 239 Truck Suspension, Steering, and Brakes
1-4-3
Suspension systems, hydraulic and air brakes, and steering mechanisms and systems in motor trucks; theory of operation, diagnosis, and repair with emphasis on performing inspections, preventive maintenance, and required service. Prerequisite: DPE 251 or approval of instructor or department chair. S
DPE 251 Diesel Engine Overhaul
2-4-4
Complete overhaul of a diesel engine and return to field service using an appropriate company service manual; disassembly and reassembly procedure, measuring for wear, machining and overhaul procedures common to a dealership, tune-up and break-in procedures. F
DPE 253 Advanced Diesel Fuel Systems
2-2-3
Diesel fuel systems, principles of computer-controlled diesel engines, emphasis on diagnosis and troubleshooting, understanding user interface with electronic engine software. S
DPE 254 Advanced Power Trains
2-3-3
Troubleshooting and diagnosis of power shift transmissions, pressure and flow testing of transmission oil pumps, pressure testing of clutch packs, calibration of transmission controllers, following step-by-step testing flowcharts for power train diagnostic work. Prerequisites: DPE 110, DPE 135, and/or concurrent enrollment in DPE 235. S
DPE 259 Service Department Implementation
2-2-3
Simulation of service department including diagnostic work, disassembly work, repair work, assembly work, and customer relation skills. Practice labor documentation. Must have diesel program tool set. Prerequisites: DPE 110, DPE 135, DPE 151, DPE 251, DPE 230, DPE 234, or approval of diesel instructor or department chair. S

Drafting
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
DRT 119 Blueprint Reading and Technical Drawing
3-0-3
Interpretation of working drawings to translate drawings into product. Includes technical sketching to communicate modifications. Dimensioned projections, sectional views, symbols, and schematics are used. F

Dietary Manager
Health Professions
217/351-2224 • www.parkland.edu/hp
DTP 106 Cultural Foods
3-0-3
Study of how foods and culture affect customs and habits. Examines how food patterns, availability, and nutritional status affect cultural traditions. S Su
DTP 112 Introduction to Dietetic Careers
1-0-1
Focuses on a variety of traditional and nontraditional dietetic career paths, including clinical, community, food service, research, and food company settings. F S Su
DTP 114 Nutrition Counseling
3-0-3
Interactive skill building course that provides a variety of dietary counseling theories and behavioral change theories that students will put into action. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in BIO 120 or DTP 120. F
DTP 120 Nutrition and Diet Therapy
3-0-3
Basic nutrition and disease. Special emphasis will be on diet therapy and why modified diets are prescribed for specific disease states. F S Su
DTP 122 Community Nutrition
3-2-4
Introduces the student to culturally diverse ethnic populations, and local, state, and national community nutrition resources. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in BIO 120. S
DTP 126 Nutrition and the Life Cycles
3-0-3
The relationship of nutritional requirements to the stages of the life cycle from conception through aging. Prerequisites: BIO 120 and DTP 120. S Su
DTP 133 Nutrition Seminar I
1-0-1
In-depth look at current trends in nutrition such as the new food guide my plate, phytochemicals, herbal supplements, and clinical research. F Su
DTP 138 Food Service Seminar I
1-0-1
In-depth look at current trends in food service, such as food and biotechnology, food irradiation, and food safety. S
DTP 173 Medical Nutrition Therapy for Dietary Managers
3-0-3
Basic nutrition and medical nutrition therapy. F S
DTP 175 Food Service Management for Dietary Managers
3-0-3
Food service management and human resource essentials. F S
DTP 201 Clinical Nutrition
4-2-5
Diseases of the human body and how they affect nutritional status. Strong emphasis on nutritional assessment and calculation of dietary needs. Prerequisites: DTP 120 and DTP 126. F
DTP 215 Clinical Practicum I
0-12-1.5-
Supervised learning and work experience in a variety of settings related to community nutrition, clinical nutrition, and dietary food service management. Student will be assigned by program director to one of those rotations. Prerequisite: DTP 201. Su FE
DTP 235 Clinical Practicum II
0-24-3-
Supervised learning and work experience in a variety of settings related to community nutrition, clinical nutrition, and food service management. Student will be assigned by program director to two of those rotations. Prerequisite: DTP 201. S Su
DTP 275 Dietary Manager Practicum
0-12-1-
Emphasis on nutrition and medical nutrition therapy; management of foodservice; and human resource management in the foodservice department. Clinicals are a continuation of skill development in a supervised setting related to dietary food service. F S Su

Electrical Construction Journeyman
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
ECJ 111 IBEW Electrical Construction Journeyman I
2-2-3
Part of IBEW Apprenticeship Program: job site safety, electricians tools, material rigging, basic conduit bending, direct current theory, and series circuit calculations. Prerequisites: acceptance in IBEW Apprenticeship School and MAT 131. F S
ECJ 112 IBEW Electrical Construction Journeyman II
3-2-4
Part of the IBEW Apprenticeship Program: serial and parallel circuits, National Electric Code, and basic blueprint reading. Prerequisite: ECJ 111. F S
ECJ 113 IBEW Electrical Construction Journeyman III
2-2-3
Part of IBEW Apprenticeship Program: codeology as it relates to the National Electrical Code (NEC), measuring processes used in the electrical industry, intermediate conduit bending, and hydraulic, mechanical, and hand benders. Prerequisite: ECJ 112. F S
ECJ 114 IBEW Electrical Construction Journeyman IV
3-2-4
Part of IBEW Apprenticeship Program: inductance and capacitance in AC circuits, National Electrical Code (NEC) standards relating to transformers, transformer theory, design, and calculation, and wiring methods and devices. Prerequisite: ECJ 113. F S
ECJ 115 IBEW Electrical Construction Journeyman V
2-2-3
Part of IBEW Apprenticeship Program: DC/AC review, semiconductors, transistors, SCRs, amplifiers, and electronic applications. Prerequisite: ECJ 114. F S
ECJ 116 IBEW Electrical Construction Journeyman VI
3-2-4
Part of IBEW Apprenticeship Program: National Electrical Code (NEC) Article 250, electrical theory to grounding, grounded conducted, service grounding, earth testing, WYE and Delta 3-phase transformers, and load calculations. Prerequisite: ECJ 115. F S
ECJ 117 IBEW Apprenticeship I
0-16-2
Electrician internship on-the-job component of Electrician Apprenticeship program: work relating to the wiring of residential, commercial, industrial, and/or specialized electrical systems. All on-the-job work-related activities performed under direct supervision of a journeyman. Prerequisite: acceptance in IBEW Apprenticeship School. F S
ECJ 118 IBEW Apprenticeship II
0-16-2
Electrician internship on-the-job component of Electrician Apprenticeship program: work relating to the wiring of residential, commercial, industrial, and/or specialized electrical systems. All on-the-job work-related activities performed under direct supervision of a journeyman. Prerequisite: ECJ 117. F S
ECJ 119 IBEW Apprenticeship III
0-16-2
Electrician internship on-the-job component of Electrician Apprenticeship program: work relating to the wiring of residential, commercial, industrial, and/or specialized electrical systems. All on-the-job work-related activities performed under direct supervision of a journeyman. Prerequisite: ECJ 118. F S
ECJ 211 IBEW Electrical Construction Journeyman VII
2-2-3
Part of IBEW Apprenticeship Program: motor constructions, motor installations, protection, controls, and schematic diagrams. Prerequisite: ECJ 116. F S
ECJ 212 IBEW Electrical Construction Journeyman VIII
3-2-4
Part of IBEW Apprenticeship Program: digital logic, ladder logic, logic circuits and controls, AC motor speed controls, power factoring, power filtering, power harmonics, cable tray, motor control circuits and protection, and hazardous locations. Prerequisite: ECJ 211. F S
ECJ 213 IBEW Electrical Construction Journeyman IX
2-2-3
Part of IBEW Apprenticeship Program: fire alarm systems troubleshooting; fundamentals of instrumentation and equipment used for calibration; telephone wiring and introduction to TIA/EIA standards and codes; high voltage test equipment; air conditioning systems and basic security systems. Prerequisite: ECJ 212. F S
ECJ 214 IBEW Electrical Construction Journeyman X
3-2-3
Part of IBEW Apprenticeship Program: programmable logic controllers (PLC) basics, operation, and installation; designing and programming PLC; National Electrical Code (NEC) for special conditions; and NEC calculations. Prerequisite: ECJ 213. F S
ECJ 215 IBEW Apprenticeship IV
0-16-2
Electrician internship on-the-job component of Electrician Apprenticeship program: work relating to the wiring of residential, commercial, industrial, and/or specialized electrical systems. All on-the-job work-related activities performed under direct supervision of a journeyman. Prerequisite: ECJ 119. F S
ECJ 216 IBEW Apprenticeship V
0-16-2
Electrician internship on-the-job component of Electrician Apprenticeship program: work relating to the wiring of residential, commercial, industrial, and/or specialized electrical systems. All on-the-job work-related activities performed under direct supervision of a journeyman. Prerequisite: ECJ 215. F S

Economics
Social Sciences and Human Services
217/351-2229 • www.parkland.edu/sshs
ECO 101 Principles of Macroeconomics
3-0-3
(IAI S3 901) Introduction to the American economic system with emphasis on macroeconomics, including national income accounting, employment theory, and fiscal and monetary policies. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
ECO 102 Principles of Microeconomics
3-0-3
(IAI S3 902) Microeconomics, including utility, supply and demand, and product and resource pricing with specific emphasis on associated problems of American economy. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
ECO 165 Economics and Politics of the European Community
3-0-3
Process and institutions of European economic and political integration; emphasis on European Community countries and countries of the European Free Trade Area. (Salzburg Program only)

Education
Social Sciences and Human Services
217/351-2229 • www.parkland.edu/sshs
EDU 101 Introduction to Education
2-2-3
Philosophy and history of American public education and the role of the teacher. Discussion of current issues in education and 30 hours of observation in public schools. A criminal background investigation is required prior to observation. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
EDU 103 Introduction to Educational Technology
3-0-3
Builds on basic computer and Internet knowledge; helps students find innovative ways to incorporate technology into lesson plans to meet the needs of all learners. Designed for education majors and individuals teaching full time. F
EDU 104 Introduction to Special Education
3-0-3
Examination of exceptional individuals and the educational system's service provision to them. Explores social, emotional, cognitive, and physical functioning and needs, as well as the specific legislation, programs, services, and interventions designed to meet these needs. Prerequisite: EDU 101.

Electrical Telecommunications Installer/Technician
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
EIT 194 Installer/Technician Apprenticeship I
0-16-2
On-the-job component of the Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program. Work related to the basics of electrical installations. All on-the-job experience performed under the direct supervision of an experienced journeyman. Prerequisite: admission to the IBEW Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program.
EIT 195 Installer/Technician Apprenticeship II
0-16-2
On-the-job component of the Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program. Work related to telephone, paging, security, fire alarm, and LAN systems. All on-the-job experience performed under the direct supervision of an experienced journeyman. Prerequisite: admission to the IBEW Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program.
EIT 196 Installer/Technician Apprenticeship III
0-16-2
On-the-job component of the Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program. Work related to semiconductors, RF communications, CCTV, home theaters and sound reinforcement systems. All on-the-job experience performed under the direct supervision of an experienced journeyman. Prerequisite: admission to the IBEW Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program.
EIT 251 Installer/Technician Telephony
2-0-2
Various types of telephone systems; installation requirements and troubleshooting. Prerequisite: admission to IBEW Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program.
EIT 252 Paging Systems
2-0-2
Operation, installation and troubleshooting of paging, voice evacuation, and nurse call systems. Prerequisite: admission to IBEW Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program.
EIT 253 Security & Fire Alarm Systems
1-0-1
Operation, installation and troubleshooting of security, access control and fire alarm systems. Prerequisite: admission to IBEW Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program.
EIT 254 Local Area Networks
2-0-2
Networking technologies for the installer/technician. Prerequisite: admission to IBEW Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program.
EIT 255 Installer Code and Grounding
2-0-2
NEC for installer/technicians including wiring methods, optical fiber cables and grounding. Prerequisite: admission to IBEW Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program.
EIT 256 Semiconductors
1-3-2
Semiconductor properties and operation. Prerequisite: admission to IBEW Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program.
EIT 257 Advanced Telecommunications Technology
3-0-3
Operation, installation, and troubleshooting of RF communications, CCTV, sound reinforcement systems, automation. Prerequisite: admission to IBEW Installer/Technician Apprenticeship program.

Electronics and Electrical Power
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
ELT 111 Computer Applications for Technicians
2-2-3 or 2-0-2-
Introduction to personal computers, using Windows-based operating system and applications to create and edit technical documents using the Internet, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. F S
ELT 131 Residential Wiring
2-2-3
Single phase power distribution and transmission systems. Interpretation and use of National Electrical Code; interpretation of blueprints and wiring techniques as applied from service entrance to load. Prerequisite: MAT 060 or MAT 094 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher. F S
ELT 134 Motors, Controls, and Drives
2-2-3
Electrical symbols and ladder and wiring diagrams used to control motors and controls including DC, single- and three-phase, electromagnetic, and DC and AC electronic controllers. Emphasis on control, wiring, and troubleshooting of motors and control circuits. Prerequisite: ELT 150 with a grade of C or higher. S
ELT 150 Introduction to Electricity and Electronics
2-2-3
DC and AC circuits and test instruments. Following national skill standards (EIA/EIF), includes work habits; basic and practical skills; and survey of motors, relays, and transformers. Prerequisite: MAT 060 or MAT 094 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher. F S
ELT 155 Digital Control Systems
2-2-3
Digital control using a microcontroller; software control of counters, sequencing, logical decisions, digital outputs, digital inputs, analog input to digital conversion, digital to analog output conversion. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in ELT 150. S
ELT 171 Analog Control Systems
2-2-3
Characteristics and application of electronic components, and amplifiers. Component identification and testing, circuit construction, operation, and troubleshooting of analog control systems. Prerequisite: ELT 150. S
ELT 179 Industrial Control Devices
2-2-3
Introduction to the electronic control devices and systems used in industry: interface devices, drives, controllers, motors, process control and instrumentation, industrial process techniques, detectors, sensors, and programmable controllers. F
ELT 191 Security and Home Automation
2-2-3
Security, surveillance, and automation controls. Components, systems and the structured wiring used in home security, automation, and entertainment. Mechanical, environmental, and electrical requirements for distributing and interfacing security systems, automation controls, communication, and entertainment in homes. Prerequisite: ELT 150. F
ELT 230 Transformers and Generators
2-2-3
Transformers in residential and industrial applications. Single phase power generators, energy sources, and transfer switches. Prerequisite: ELT 150 with a grade of C or higher. S
ELT 231 Programmable Controllers
2-2-3
Programmable logic controllers with emphasis on creating application programs to solve control problems. Course includes an overview of PLC systems, number systems, I/O modules, basic and advanced instructions, system configuration, and troubleshooting. Prerequisite: ELT 179. S
ELT 292 Process Control
2-2-3
Process control concepts using advanced capabilities of PLC systems: Interfacing devices, process controllers, pressure, temperature, flow and level measurement, A/D, D/A, PID control, and Human Machine Interface (HMI) using RSView32 to monitor and control machines and processes. Prerequisite: ELT 231. F
ELT 293 Industrial Control Networks
2-2-3
Control networks used in industry; devices, media, protocols, and test equipment used to control devices and acquire data. Serial, DH-485, device net, CAN. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or approval of instructor or department chair. S
ELT 295 Modicon Automation and Control
2-2-3
Modicon M340 automation controller, configure I/O and data communications, create control programs using IEC 61131-3 international languages to include function block diagrams, structured text, and ladder diagram programming. Interfacing and programming touchscreen terminals. Prerequisite: ELT 231. S
ELT 299 Robotics and Automation
2-2-3
Robotics fundamentals: capabilities and applications, mechanical and electrical requirements, operation, and programming. Automation techniques and devices, controls and feedback mechanisms, servo motors and motion control. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or approval of instructor or department chair. F

Emergency Medical Services
Health Professions
217/351-2224 • www.parkland.edu/hp
EMS 110 Emergency Medical Services I: EMT-B
3-6-5
Focuses on overall role and responsibilities of the emergency medical technician. Includes skills in patient interaction, diagnosis, and emergency medical treatment. Upon successful completion, the student is eligible to take the Illinois EMT-B Certification Examination. Prerequisite: Health Care Provider CPR card. F S
EMS 112 EMT-Paramedic I
1.5-1-2
Occupation of EMT-Paramedic, history of emergency medical technician, leadership and delegation skills. Assess accident scene, identify growth and development differences, provide community education, and identify legal issues. Prerequisites: acceptance into EMT-Paramedic Certificate Program, current BLS card, and BIO 111. Su
EMS 113 EMT-Paramedic II
4-6-6-
Medical, legal, and ethical issues of EMT-Paramedic. Medical terminology, pathophysiology, cellular growth and adaptation, fluid balance, and body responses to illness/accidents. Pharmacology, drug calculations, drug administration, and intravenous therapy. Assessment skills in airway management. Prerequisite: EMS 112. Su
EMS 114 EMT-Paramedic III
7-5-8.5-
Advanced level of patient assessment, critical thinking, and decision making skills. Communication skills including radio communication assimilations. Pathophysiology of pulmonary and cardiac system including EKG rhythm interpretation and treatment modalities. Prerequisite: EMS 113. F
EMS 115 EMT-Paramedic IV
7-5-8.5-
Focus on advanced treatment for reproductive, gynecological conditions, diseases, and emergency modalities. Assessment and treatment of geriatric patients, psychological disorders, and traumas. Awareness of ambulance operations, HAZMAT, and MEMSI operations. Prerequisite: EMS 114. S

English
Humanities
217/351-2217 • www.parkland.edu/hum
Assessment Program
Students enrolling in an English composition course for the first time at Parkland must be placed at the appropriate level on the basis of (1) their ACT or SAT scores, (2) their performance on Parkland's English assessment test, or (3) college-level composition credit transferred from another school.

Students placed in a preparatory English composition class (ENG 098 or 099) can satisfy the requirements for admission to college-level English composition by (1) passing ENG 099 with an A or B grade or (2) writing a college-entry-level essay at the completion of ENG 098 or 099.

Learning Communities are Pell-eligible, full-time programs in which students begin to satisfy General Education Core Curriculum requirements needed for an associate's degree while developing the writing skills taught in ENG 098 and ENG 099.
ENG 098 Writing Skills Review I
3-0-3
Extensive writing practice with emphasis on paragraph organization and development leading to multiple-paragraph essays and engagement with outside ideas and texts. Systematic review of grammar, mechanics, and sentence structure. Based on end-of-course assessment, students may proceed to ENG 099 or ENG 101. Concurrent enrollment in CCS 098 or CCS 099 may be required. Prerequisite: placement. F S Su
ENG 099 Writing Skills Review II
3-0-3
Extensive writing practice with emphasis on organizing and developing essays and engagement with outside ideas and texts. Systematic review of grammar, sentence structure, and paragraph organization and development. Students may proceed to ENG 101 by earning a grade of A or B in ENG 099 or writing a successful end-of-course essay. Concurrent enrollment in CCS 098 or CCS 099 may be required. Prerequisite: ENG 098 with a grade of C or higher or placement. F S Su
ENG 101 Composition I
3-0-3
(IAI C1 900) Essay writing with emphasis on writing process, purpose and audience awareness, critical analysis, focus, organization, development, clarity, coherence, and engagement with outside texts. Credit is allowed for only one of the following: ENG 101-102 or ENG 106. Credit is not given for both ENG 101 and ESL 101. A grade of C or higher is required in ENG 101 to fulfill IAI General Education Core Curriculum requirements for transfer programs. Prerequisite: ENG 099 with a grade of B or higher, end-of-course assessment in ENG 098 or ENG 099, or placement. F S Su
ENG 102 Composition II
3-0-3
(IAI C1 901R) Research-paper writing emphasizing adoption, narrowing, and logical support of a thesis in awareness of a readers needs; developing effective research techniques; and accurately documenting sources in a conventional format. Credit is allowed for only one of the following: ENG 101- 102 or ENG 106. Credit is not given for both ENG102 and ESL 102. A grade of C or higher is required in ENG 102 to fulfill IAI General Education Core Curriculum requirements for transfer programs. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher. F S Su
ENG 106 Accelerated Composition
4-0-4
(IAI C1 901R) An accelerated course in essay and research paper writing emphasizing writing process, purpose and audience, critical analysis, focus, organization, development, clarity, coherence, research techniques, and accurate documentation (see ENG 101 and ENG 102). Fulfills freshman composition requirements in all programs. Credit is allowed for only one of the following: ENG 101-102 or ENG 106. A grade of C or higher is required in ENG 106 to fulfill IAI General Education Core Curriculum requirements for transfer programs. Prerequisite: placement. F S
ENG 115 English Grammar and Punctuation
2-0-2
Grammar and punctuation of standard written English; parts of speech, types of punctuation, and common grammatical errors. F S
ENG 161 Creative Writing I-Fiction
3-0-3
(IAI EGL 921) Introductory course for exploring the structure and elements of fiction as well as the writing process; students will produce fully developed works, with attention to the development of fictional techniques, and learn terminology current in creative writing. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or equivalent with a grade of C or higher or approval of department chair. F
ENG 162 Creative Writing I-Poetry
3-0-3
(IAI EGL 922) Introductory course for exploring the structure and elements of poetry as well as the writing process; students will produce fully developed works, with attention to the development of poetic techniques, and learn terminology current in creative writing. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or equivalent with grade of C or higher or approval of department chair. F
ENG 220 Professional Writing
3-0-3
Principles of professional writing. Includes technical and business writing scenarios and case studies with an emphasis on problem solving; argumentative and process assignments; experiential projects with local or national companies. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 106 with a grade of C or higher. F S
ENG 224 Advanced Composition --- Creative Nonfiction
3-0-3
Intermediate course for exploring the structure and elements of literary nonfiction and the writing process; students will produce fully-developed works of nonfiction and demonstrate an understanding of the critical terminology of the creative writer. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 106 with a grade of C or higher. F S
ENG 261 Creative Writing II --- Fiction
3-0-3
(IAI EGL 921) Continuation of ENG 161. Intermediate course for exploring the structure and elements of fiction and the writing process; students will produce fully developed works, with attention to the further development of fictional techniques, and learn terminology current in creative writing. Prerequisite: ENG 161 or equivalent or approval of department chair. S
ENG 262 Creative Writing II --- Poetry
3-0-3
(IAI EGL 922) Continuation of ENG 162. Intermediate course for exploring the structure and elements of poetry and the writing process; students will produce fully developed works, with attention to the further development of poetic techniques, and learn terminology current in creative writing. Prerequisite: ENG 162 or equivalent or approval of department chair. S

Engineering Science
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
ENS 101 Introduction to Engineering and CAD
2-3-3
(IAI EGR 941) Introduction to engineering and design, including drafting, dimensioning, tolerancing, fasteners, and descriptive geometry. Engineering graphics topics include multi-view orthographic representations, principal auxiliary views, section views, and production drawings. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in MAT 128. S
ENS 201 Engineering Mechanics I (Statics)
2-2-3
(IAI EGR 942) Analysis of two- and three-dimensional force systems acting on nondeformable engineering structures and machines; friction, virtual work, and fluid statics. Problem-solving mechanics include geometry (graphical and analytical) and algebra (scalar and vector). Prerequisite: PHY 141. F Su
ENS 202 Engineering Mechanics of Solids
2-2-3
(IAI EGR 945) Analysis of two- and three-dimensional force systems. External and internal forces, stresses, deformations, primarily within the elastic property range of materials. Tension and compression, torsion and bending, buckling, combined stresses, repeated loads, and impact. Prerequisite: ENS 201. S
ENS 203 Engineering Mechanics II (Dynamics)
2-2-3
(IAI EGR 943) Analysis of unbalanced force systems acting on kinetics and kinematics. Problem formulation, problem-solving mechanics including geometry, algebra, and calculus. Prerequisites: ENS 201 and credit or concurrent enrollment in MAT 229. S

Electrical Residential Wiring Technician
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
ERW 191 Residential Technician Apprenticeship I
0-16-2
On-the-job component of the Residential Wireman Apprenticeship program. Work related to the basics of residential wiring. All on-the-job experience performed under the direct supervision of a journeyman. Prerequisite: admission to Residential Wireman Apprenticeship program.
ERW 192 Residential Technician Apprenticeship II
0-16-2
On-the-job component of the Residential Wireman Apprenticeship program. Work related to the second year of the prescribed program; codeology, AC theory, residential motors and transformers, and lighting and receptacle wiring. All work performed under the direct supervision of a journeyman. Prerequisite: admission to the second year of the Residential Wireman Apprenticeship program.
ERW 193 Residential Technician Apprenticeship III
0-16-2
On-the-job component of the Residential Wireman Apprenticeship program. Work related to third year apprenticeship skills: special purpose outlets, air conditioning and heating, telephone and fiber optic installation, smoke, heat, carbon monoxide and security systems, pools and spas. Prerequisite: admission to the third year of Residential Wireman Apprenticeship program.
ERW 231 Residential Wiring Practices
3-3-4
Residential lighting, special purpose outlets, security systems, swimming pools and hot tubs, hot water heaters. Prerequisite: admission to IBEW Residential Wireman Apprenticeship program.
ERW 232 Residential Code
2-3-3
Boxes and conduits used in residential applications and National Electrical Code (NEC) regulations. Prerequisite: third year status in IBEW Residential Wireman Apprenticeship program.
ERW 233 Residential Motors and Transformers
2-0-2
Motors and transformers commonly used in residential applications. Prerequisite: admission to IBEW Residential Wireman Apprenticeship program.
ERW 234 Telephone and Security Basics
2-0-2
Installation and operation of security and telephone systems. Prerequisite: admission to IBEW Residential Wireman Apprenticeship program.
ERW 235 Residential Fire Alarm and Security
2-0-2
Operation and installation procedures of detection and alarm systems for single family dwellings. Prerequisite: admission to IBEW Residential Wireman Apprenticeship program.
ERW 236 Residential Advanced Technology
6-0-6
Operation and installation of residential cabling systems, including networking, video, audio, home theater. Prerequisite: admission to IBEW Residential Wireman Apprenticeship program.

Earth Science
Natural Sciences
217/351-2285 • www.parkland.edu/ns
ESC 101 Introduction to Weather
3-2-4
(IAI P1 905L) Basic meteorology with emphasis on topics directly related to everyday experiences with weather while stressing the understanding and application of meteorological principles. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
ESC 102 Introduction to Physical Geology
3-2-4
(IAI P1 907L) Introduces physical geologic processes, materials, and landforms through lecture, hands-on lab activities, map reading and optional field experiences. Topics include plate tectonics, geologic time, minerals, rocks, volcanoes, weathering, mass wasting, streams, glaciers, groundwater, earthquakes, and rock structures.Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su

English as a Second Language
Humanities
217/351-2217 • www.parkland.edu/hum
English as a Second Language Program
The ESL program offers a series of 3-credit-hour courses for academic preparation in four skill areas. These courses are available from beginning through advanced levels in grammar/writing and listening/speaking/pronunciation. Students can enroll part-time in one course or full-time. Specialized electives appear as 500-level ESL courses in the class schedule.
ESL 071 Reading / Vocabulary I
2-2-3
Development of high-beginning level academic reading and vocabulary skills for speakers of English as a second language. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 072 Reading / Vocabulary II
2-2-3
Development of intermediate level academic reading and vocabulary skills for speakers of English as a second language. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 073 Reading / Vocabulary III
2-2-3
Development of high-intermediate level academic reading and vocabulary skills for speakers of English as a second language. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 074 Reading / Vocabulary IV
2-2-3
Development of low-advanced level academic reading and vocabulary skills for speakers of English as a second language. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 076 English for Academic Purposes
2-2-3
Development of intermediate-level academic grammar/writing, listening/speaking, and reading/vocabulary skills for students of English as a second language. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 080 Diagnostic Testing for ESL Listening/Speaking/Pronunciation
2-2-3
Individual advising leads to placement into a skill level appropriate to the student's oral communication abilities. F S Su
ESL 081 Listening/Speaking/Pronunciation I
2-2-3
Development of beginning listening/speaking/pronunciation skills for students of English as a second language. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 082 Listening/Speaking/Pronunciation II
2-2-3
Development of low-intermediate listening/speaking/pronunciation skills for students of English as a second language. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 083 Listening/Speaking/Pronunciation III
2-2-3
Development of intermediate listening/speaking/pronunciation skills for students of English as a second language. Introduction to academic listening, note-taking, and small group participation. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 084 Listening/Speaking/Pronunciation IV
2-2-3
Development of high-intermediate listening/speaking/pronunciation skills for students of English as a second language. Academic listening, note-taking, and small group participation. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 085 Listening/Speaking/Pronunciation V
2-2-3
Development of advanced listening/speaking/pronunciation skills for students of English as a second language. Academic lecture listening, note-taking, small group leadership, and oral presentations. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 086 English Language Pronunciation
3-0-3
Integrated skills approach to evaluating and improving oral production skills for non-native speakers of English. F S Su
ESL 087 English Language Conversation Practice
1-0-1
Improve students' conversational fluency in spoken English. F S
ESL 088 Community English
0-4-2
Small group and individual ESL instruction in reading, writing, listening, speaking fluency, and pronunciation. F S
ESL 089 ESL Research and Technology Skills
0-4-2
Research and technology skills for non-native speakers of English. F S
ESL 090 Diagnostic Testing for ESL Grammar/Reading/Writing
3-3-4
Individual advising leads to placement into a skill level appropriate to the student's grammar and writing proficiency. F S Su
ESL 091 Grammar/Writing I
3-3-4
Introduction to basic grammar and structures of writing for students of English as a second language. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 092 Grammar/Writing II
3-3-4
Development of low-intermediate grammar and writing skills for students of English as a second language. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 093 Grammar/Writing III
3-3-4
Development of intermediate grammar and writing skills for students of English as a second language. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 094 Grammar/Writing IV
3-3-4
Development of high-intermediate grammar and writing skills for students of English as a second language. Introduction to essay format and college-level discourse. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 095 Grammar/Writing V
3-3-4
Development of advanced grammar and writing skills for students of English as a second language. Preparation for college writing and textbook reading. Prerequisite: placement by advisor.
ESL 097 American Academic Culture for Non-Native Speakers
2-2-3
Introduction to and development of American academic culture for speakers of English as a second language. Preparation for college-level coursework. Repeatable for a maximum of 9 credit hours. Prerequisite: placement by advisor. F S Su
ESL 099 Writing Skills for Non-Native Speakers
4-0-4
Extensive writing practice emphasizing organization and development of essays and paragraphs, and engagement with outside ideas/texts. Systematic review of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with attention to second-language writing development. Repeatable for a maximum of 16 credit hours. Prerequisite: placement. F S Su
ESL 101 English Composition for Non-Native Speakers I
4-0-4
(IAI C1 900) Essay writing with emphasis on writing process, purpose and audience awareness, critical analysis, focus, organization, development, clarity, coherence, and engagement with outside texts. An alternative to ENG 101 to meet the needs of non-native speakers of English in all programs. Credit is not given for both ENG 101 and ESL 101. A grade of C or higher is required in ESL 101 to fulfill IAI General Education Core Curriculum requirements for transfer programs. Prerequisite: ESL 099 with a grade of C or higher or placement. F S Su
ESL 102 English Composition for Non-Native Speakers II
4-0-4
(IAI C1 901R) Research-paper writing emphasizing adoption, narrowing, and logical support of a thesis in awareness of a reader's needs; developing effective research techniques; and accurately documenting sources in a conventional format. An alternative to ENG 102 to meet the needs of non-native speakers of English in all programs. Credit not given for both ENG 102 and ESL 102. A grade of C or higher is required in ESL 102 to fulfill IAI General Education Core Curriculum requirements for transfer programs. Prerequisite: ESL 101 or ENG 101 with a grade of C or higher. F S Su
ESL 570 TOEFL Preparation
3-0-3
Students will practice English skills and test taking strategies for TOEFL. F S

Engineering Science and Technologies
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
EST 110 Engineering Science and Technologies --- CAD Work Experience
0-5-1 or 0-10-2-
On an independent study basis, students complete an advanced CAD project in an area in which they seek experience and employment. Prerequisites: credit or concurrent enrollment in CAD 116, CAD 118, and CIT 112, and approval of program director or department chair. Repeatable 3 times. F S
EST 113 Work Experience and Ethics
.5-4-1
Prepare resume and cover letter. Detailed journal documenting internship. Introduction to work ethics and traits that employers look for in current and prospective employees.
EST 114 Career and Technical Ethics
1-0-1 or 2-0-2-
Introduction to the importance of work ethics and the top 10 work ethic traits that employers look for in current and prospective employees. Emphasis on how strong work ethics help employees succeed in the workplace. F S Su

Floor Coverer
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
FLR 113 Carpet Basics
2-0-2
History of carpet industry, installation tools and equipment, carpet construction, installer professionalism, and residential vs. commercial carpet markets. Prerequisites: CCA 111 and CCA 112.
FLR 114 Floor Preparation
3-6-5
Tools and equipment, floor construction and styles, preparation of concrete and wooden floors before carpet installation. Safety involving asbestos in adhesives and existing flooring. Prerequisites: CCA 111 and CCA 112.
FLR 115 Carpet Layout and Installation
3-6-5
Planning, measuring, and estimation. Installation of carpets on stairs. Prerequisites: FLR 113 and FLR 114.
FLR 116 Supplemental Skills for Carpet Installation
1-3-2
Carpet removal, carpet modular installation, spray adhesives, installation of woven and pattern carpets. Prerequisite: FLR 115.
FLR 117 Resilient Basic Knowledge
.5-1.5-1
Introduction to systems and methods used with tile and linoleum floors including emphasis on safety with tools and materials. Prerequisites: FLR 115 and FLR 116.
FLR 211 Resilient Floor Preparation
1-3-2
Removal of existing flooring, subfloors, adhesives, and estimating. Prerequisites: FLR 115 and FLR 116.
FLR 212 Resilient Installation I
1-6-3
Installation techniques for residential and commercial vinyl floors, including tools, methods, and safety. Prerequisite: FLR 117.
FLR 213 Resilient Installation II
1-6-3
Installation techniques for reverse resilient products, including tool usage and adhesives. Prerequisite: FLR 212.
FLR 214 Resilient Supplemental Skills
1-3-2
Repairing resilient flooring, treads and risers, coving, tiling a circular room. Prerequisite: FLR 212.
FLR 215 Hardwood Floors
2-9-5
Tools, equipment, and procedures used to install hardwood floors. Prerequisite: FLR 214.
FLR 216 Hardwood Floors Supplemental Skills
1-6-3
Types of hardwood flooring, vapor retards, borders, parquet floors, repairs to hardwood floors. Prerequisite: FLR 214.

French
Humanities
217/351-2217 • www.parkland.edu/hum
FRE 100 Introduction to Basic French I
2-0-2
Intended for students with no previous instruction in French. Basic French with attention to oral communication, culture, and language needs of student, traveler, and worker. F S Su
FRE 101 Beginning French I
4-0-4
For students with no previous and/or little instruction in French. Development of basic communicative skills. Emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and on Francophone culture. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. (Also in Dijon Program) F S
FRE 102 Beginning French II
4-0-4
Continued development of communicative skills. Emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and on Francophone culture. Prerequisite: FRE 101 or equivalent. (Also in Dijon Program) F S Su
FRE 103 Intermediate French I
4-0-4
Development of intermediate-level communicative competence. Emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and on Francophone culture. Prerequisite: FRE 102 or equivalent. (Also in Dijon Program) F
FRE 104 Intermediate French II
4-0-4
(IAI H1 900) Continued development and refinement of intermediate-level communicative competence. Emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and on Francophone culture. Prerequisite: FRE 103 or equivalent. (Also in Dijon Program) S
FRE 120 Introduction to Basic French II
2-0-2
Continuing basic French with attention to oral communication, culture, and language needs of student, traveler, and worker. Prerequisite: FRE 100 or equivalent. S

Fire Service Technology
Social Sciences and Human Services
217/351-2229 • www.parkland.edu/sshs
FST 111 Introduction to the Fire Service
3-0-3
Provides an overview to fire service; career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; philosophy and history of the fire service; fire loss analysis; organization and function of public fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to fire strategy and tactics. F
FST 112 Command Officer Management I
3-0-3
One of two management courses required for Illinois certification as a Fire Officer I. Presents a basic course to help individuals develop the skills needed to supervise and direct personnel and manage resources at the company level. Prepares student for certification as Fire Officer I. FE
FST 114 Fire Prevention Principles I
3-0-3
Provides basic information about fire prevention activities conducted by the fire department. SO
FST 115 Tactics and Strategy I
3-0-3
Survey of fire suppression companies; basic elements of fireground tactics and organization; manpower, apparatus, equipment, and systems utilization. Emphasis on preplanning fireground organization and decision making for the company officer. SO
FST 117 Pump Operator
3-0-3
Theoretical and practical hydraulics, maintenance procedures, and apparatus testing used by fire departments. Apparatus operators. Qualifies firefighters for OSFM Certification as a Fire Apparatus Engineer. F
FST 118 Fire Service Instructor I
3-0-3
Methods of classroom instruction: lesson plans and human relations in the teaching-learning environment. SO
FST 130 Civilian/Law Enforcement Bypass Course
3-0-3
Required by the Office of the State Fire Marshal for certification of civilians as fire prevention officers and law enforcement officers as fire investigators. Emphasizes baseline fire science knowledge not possessed by civilians. F S Su
FST 210 Hazardous Materials First Responder/Operation
3-0-3
Systems approach to storage, transportation, and handling of hazardous materials, flammable liquids, combustible solids, oxidizing and corrosive materials, and radioactive compounds. Use of reference sources on various hazardous materials. Emphasis on control of hazardous materials incidents. F
FST 212 Command Officer Management II
3-0-3
One of two management courses required for Illinois certification as a Fire Officer I. Provides management principles and techniques used by mid-level managers and chief officers in the fire service and emphasizes principles of time management, decision making, motivation, and delegation. SO
FST 215 Fire Fighting Strategy and Tactics
3-0-3
Strategic concepts in fire fighting, locations of fire fighting resources, tactics emphasizing use of operational plans, and pre fire plans. Establishment of command for operational control and use and control of mutual aid during multiple emergencies or simple catastrophic fires or disasters. SE
FST 218 Fire Service Instructor II
3-0-3
Methods of classroom instruction structured to provide information about writing performance objectives, developing lesson plans, and methods of testing and evaluating students. SE
FST 234 Command Officer Management III
3-0-3
One of two management courses required for Illinois certification as a Fire Officer II. Provides management principles and techniques used by mid-level managers and chief officers in the fire service. Principles of public relations, labor relations, administrative liability, and personnel management emphasized. FO
FST 235 Command Officer Management IV
3-0-3
Prepares the fire officer to develop budgets, evaluate subordinates, maintain records, conduct public relations, and develop fire department rules and Standard Operating Procedures. SE
FST 250 Fire & Emergency Management Computer Systems
2-2-3
Fire and Emergency Services information management systems, system analysis techniques, data processing concepts, terminology, equipment, and applications. Hands-on experience with microcomputers including software packages for data analysis and emergency management applications. Prerequisite: MAT 086, MAT 098, or assessment. F S Su
FST 251 Fire Inspector I
3-0-3
Course required for Fire Inspector I state certification. Authority of fire prevention responsibilities including inspection procedures; plans review; fire hazard recognition; installed systems familiarization; building construction, occupancy classification; site access and means of egress considerations; and emergency planning. FE
FST 253 Public Fire & Life Safety Educator
3-0-3
Provides the Public Fire / Life Safety Educator I component required for certification as Fire Prevention Officer I by Office of State Fire Marshal. Also provides Public Information Officer and Juvenile Fire-Setter Intervention Specialist I certification.

Graphic Design
Fine and Applied Arts
217/351-2392 • www.parkland.edu/faa
GDS 102 Graphic Design History
3-0-3
Surveys the field of graphic design from its origins to contemporary practice. Develops visual vocabulary, provides insight into the continuity of design thinking, and provides cultural and historical context for design practice. F S
GDS 108 Design Media and Principles
2-2-3
Introduction to composition and visual literacy for digital media artists and designers. Surveys a broad range of digital tools including the Adobe Creative Suite. Prerequisite: proficiency with personal computers and Internet browsing. F S Su
GDS 110 Typography I
2-2-3
Introduction to creative typography for visual communication. Create typographic compositions using Adobe Creative Suite tools for print and web. Emphasis on terminology, typographic traditions, type aesthetics. Prerequisite: proficiency with personal computers and Internet browsing. F S
GDS 120 Graphic Design I
1-5-3
Introduction to the creative process and image making with a focus on composition. Solve real world visual communication problems in a hands-on studio environment using Adobe Creative Suite (Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign). Prerequisite: GDS 108 or ART 121, ART 122 or approval of program director or department chair. F S
GDS 122 Graphic Design II
2-2-3
Introduction to systems of visual organization in graphic design with a focus on conceptual development and print production. Develop dynamic portfolio samples using Adobe Creative Suite. Prerequisite: GDS 120. F
GDS 172 Typography II
2-2-3
Compose professional-level type for print using Adobe InDesign. Emphasis on publication design, grid systems, legibility, readability, typographic hierarchy, style sheets and pre-press issues. Prerequisite: GDS 110. S
GDS 220 Graphic Design for the Web
1-5-3
A visual approach to web design with an emphasis on creative concepts and applied design principles. Design dynamic web experiences using Photoshop and Dreamweaver. Prerequisite: CIS 152, GDS 120, or approval of program director or department chair. F
GDS 222 Graphic Design III
2-2-3
Gain experience in visual problem solving through advanced design projects. Communicate creative concepts through effective use of type and images. Develop presentations skills and become power users of Adobe Creative Suite. Prerequisite: GDS 122. S
GDS 230 Motion Design
2-3-3
Create advanced motion graphics for digital video, broadcast, and the web. Develop client-driven portfolio samples with emphasis on concepts and interactivity. Communicate advertising, promotion, and editorial concepts with AfterEffects and other digital tools. Prerequisites: GDS 108, GDS 120, GDS 220, CIS 152, and CSC 186, or approval of program director or department chair. S
GDS 273 Illustration I
2-2-3
Gain experience in visual communication by creating original illustration for editorial, advertising, and instructional publications. Advanced uses of Illustrator and Photoshop. Prerequisites: GDS 108 or ART 121, ART 122, and GDS 120. F
GDS 274 Illustration II
2-2-3
Advanced creative problem-solving and conceptual thinking projects focusing on creating original images for editorial and advertising. Emphasis on building a consistent body of work with a distinctive individual style. Fine tune skills in Illustrator and Photoshop. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in GDS 273. F
GDS 292 Graphic Design Studio
1-12-3
Supervised classroom service learning project. Gain practical experience in professional business practices. Portfolio review required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: sophomore standing in Graphic Design, 3.0 program GPA, or approval of instructor or department chair. F S
GDS 293 Portfolio Seminar
2-2-3
Under the direction of the instructor, students fine-tune and edit their portfolios, design a self-promotion campaign, build a self-promotion web site, and develop their personal résumés. Includes seminars with industry professionals. Prerequisite: GDS 220, sophomore standing in Graphic Design, 3.0 program GPA, or approval of instructor or department chair. S

Geography
Social Sciences and Human Services
217/351-2229 • www.parkland.edu/sshs
GEO 140 World Geography
3-0-3
(IAI S4 901) World places and peoples: world regions examined for their cultural response to the physical environment. Emphasis on technologically developed regions. (Also in Canterbury Program.) F S Su
GEO 143 Geography of Underdeveloped Areas
3-0-3
(IAI S4 902N) Survey of technologically underdeveloped regions of the world: spatial arrangements of population, human institutions, economic activities, and cultural landscapes. F S Su
GEO 144 Geography of the United States
3-0-3
Introduction to regional and social diversity of the United States. Physical, historical, and economic bases of regional divisions: south (old and new), northeast (rural and urban), interior (midwest and great plains), and west (mountain and desert). (Canterbury Program only.)
GEO 200 Introduction to Economic Geography
3-0-3
(IAI S4 903N) Introduction to the study of reasons for uneven distribution of activities relating to production, exchange, and consumption of goods and services and geographic patterns created by these activities. S

German
Humanities
217/351-2217 • www.parkland.edu/hum
GER 101 Beginning German I
4-0-4
For students with no previous and/or little instruction in German. Development of basic communicative skills. Emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and on Germanic culture. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. (Also in Salzburg Austria program) F S
GER 102 Beginning German II
4-0-4
Continued development of communicative skills. Emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and on Germanic culture. Prerequisite: GER 101 or equivalent. (Also in Salzburg program) S Su
GER 103 Intermediate German I
4-0-4
Development of intermediate-level communicative competence. Emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and on Germanic culture. Prerequisite: GER 102 or equivalent. (Also in Salzburg program) F
GER 104 Intermediate German II
4-0-4
(IAI H1 900) Continued development and refinement of intermediate-level communicative competence. Emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and on Germanic culture. Prerequisite: GER 103 or equivalent. (Also in Salzburg program) S

Geographic Information Systems
Business and Agri-Industries
217/351-2213 • www.parkland.edu/bai
GIS 110 Principles of Geographic Information Systems
3-0-3
Components of basic GIS and how they are assembled: requisition of data, maps, and other information used to build a database; basic pilot projects demonstrated step-by-step through various applications in GIS.
GIS 111 Applied Geographic Information Systems
3-0-3
GIS application areas, both present and future; toxic materials, traffic flow, mining, forestry, agriculture, natural resources, energy, and communication; semester-long application project of student's choice developed on computer. Prerequisite: GIS 110. S
GIS 112 Global Positioning Systems
1-0-1
Basic principles necessary to set up, operate, and run a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiving station, and collect information with a receiver. Data collection incorporated into computer database program. Information link with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and use of GPS in GIS demonstrated.
GIS 115 Advanced Geographic Information Systems
2-2-3
Technical aspects of GIS: remotely sensed data and image interpretation, spatial data creation, tool customization, geoprocess automation, and web mapping. Prerequisite: GIS 110 or approval of department chair.
GIS 116 GIS Seminar
1-0-1
A group project through which students demonstrate their knowledge and skills developed while completing the required GIS courses. The students will present the collaborative project to a group of GIS practitioners. Prerequisite: GIS 110, GIS 111, GIS 112, and GIS 115.
GIS 119 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
1-0-1
Introduction to basic principles of geographic information systems (GIS). An overview of GIS capabilities, step-by-step procedures, applications, and analysis as they apply to business, natural resource management, governmental planning, and other related fields. S

Glazier
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
GLZ 111 Glaziers Apprentice I
3-2-4
Fundamentals of glazier trade to supplement on-the-job training for first-year apprentices. Prerequisite: acceptance into glaziers apprenticeship program. F S
GLZ 112 Glaziers Apprentice II
3-2-4
Fundamentals of glazier trade to supplement on-the-job training for first-year apprentices. Prerequisite: GLZ 111. F S
GLZ 113 Glaziers Apprentice III
3-2-4
Different types of glass and uses for experienced apprentice. Prerequisite: GLZ 112. F S
GLZ 211 Glaziers Apprentice IV
3-2-4
Procedures used in glazier trade for experienced glazier apprentice: sealants, locks and bolts, setting blocks, spacers, and entrance work. Prerequisite: GLZ 113. F S
GLZ 212 Glaziers Apprentice V
3-2-4
Advanced procedures used in glazier trade including mathematics, structural glazing, and ribbon window systems. Curtainwall construction foreman training, and communication skills. Prerequisite: GLZ 211. F S
GLZ 213 Glaziers Apprentice VI
3-2-4
Advanced applications and concepts of the glazier trade to supplement the Glazier Apprentice Program. Prerequisite: GLZ 212. F S

Health Careers
Health Professions
217/351-2224 • www.parkland.edu/hp
HCS 112 Orientation to Health Careers
2-0-2
Duties and educational requirements of health care providers. Basic body systems discussed. Develop and practice skills required in all health occupation careers. Course is equivalent to Health Occupations at the high school level. Prerequisites: CCS 099 placement, ENG 099 placement, and MAT 080 placement or MAT 095 placement. F
HCS 116 Point of Care Testing
1-0-1
Fundamentals of basic laboratory testing at point-of-care setting: necessity, training, competency, instrument or test selection, advantages and disadvantages, and compliance. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in HCS 135 or approval of program director. F S F S
HCS 117 Team Building
1-0-1
Introduces common activities of health care teams, accountability, managing stress and change, conflict resolution, organizational and problem-solving skills, interpersonal communication skills, group dynamics, cultural diversity, and responsibilities of team leaders. S
HCS 119 Job Shadowing
0-1-.5; 0-2-1; 0-3-1.5; 0-4-2; 0-5-2.5; 0-6-3-
Shadowing experience in a variety of health care settings. Prerequisite: approval of instructor or department chair. F S Su
HCS 135 Introduction to Medical Assisting
3-3-4
Skills used in medical assisting: communication, safety, infection control, basic assessment, equipment, basic anatomy and physiology, and basic first aid. Prerequisites: admission into the medical assisting program, CCS 099 placement, ENG 101 placement, and MAT 080 placement or MAT 095 placement. F S
HCS 136 Basic Topics in Healthcare
1-0-1; 2-0-2; 3-0-3; 4-0-4-
Study of new and cutting-edge topics of interest to the student new to healthcare. Repeatable for a maximum of 16 credit hours. F S Su
HCS 150 Complementary Alternative Therapies in Health Care I
3-0-3
Guided learning experience to investigate various healthcare practices such as traditional Chinese medicine, botanicals, manual techniques, mind-body techniques, and other therapies. F S
HCS 151 Health Care Records Management
2-0-2
Application of health care records management terms and skills: records ownership, types, rules for filing and systems, common documents, correspondence, and computer application (EMR). Prerequisites: CCS 099 placement, ENG 099 placement, and basic computer literacy. F S Su
HCS 153 Phlebotomy Skills
.5-1.5-1
Routine phlebotomy procedures, venipuncture techniques, phlebotomy equipment, micropuncture techniques, safe practices, and medicolegal aspects. Clinical laboratory experience in phlebotomy. Credit not given for both HCS 153 and HCS 602. F S Su
HCS 154 Medical Terminology
3-0-3
Building medical vocabulary, including learning to pronounce, spell, define, and analyze medical terms. Prerequisites: CCS 099 placement and ENG 101 placement. F S Su
HCS 155 Pharmacology for Allied Health
1-1-1
Chemical, generic, and trade name for drugs; use of drug references; pharmacological principles of drugs; routes of drug administration; Federal and Illinois regulations; classification of drugs; abbreviations and symbols for drug measurement, administration, and prescription. F S Su
HCS 156 Aseptic Techniques
1-3-2
Fundamentals of microbial control; procedures for sanitation, disinfection, and sterilization; specimen collection and handling; compliance with Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA), the U.S. Center for Communicable Disease Control (CDC), assisting with minor surgery. Prerequisites: admission into the medical assisting program and HCS 135 and HCS 154, or approval of program director or department chair. F S Su
HCS 158 Administration of Medication
1-2-2
Principles and procedures for administration of medications; legal aspects, mathematical review; emphasis on routes of drug administration. Prerequisites: HCS 135 or CCS 099 placement, ENG 101 placement, and MAT 080 placement or MAT 095 placement, and approval of program director. F S Su
HCS 170 Medical Assisting Practicum
0-18-3
Application of clinical skills, procedures, and knowledge derived from medical assisting courses. Prerequisite: completion of all required program courses with a C or higher and approval of program director. F S Su
HCS 172 Special Project for Medical Assistants
1-0-1
Organized and tailored around interests and needs of individual student. Structured to provide atmosphere of individualized research and study paralleled by professional expertise and guidance; allows best aspects of independent study and individualized learning combined to maximize student development. Prerequisites: HCS 135 and HCS 116 and admission into medical assisting program. F S Su
HCS 173 Applied Electrocardiography
1-0-1
Entry level training to professionally perform, process, and explain the electrocardiogram; overview of cardiac anatomy, physiology, and conduction systems; commonly encountered drugs in cardiac medicine; data procurement, selection, processing, overview of diagnostic tests and presentation for physician's interpretation; professional conduct. Prerequisite: HCS 135 or approval of program director. F S Su
HCS 174 Legal Issues in Health Care
1-0-1
Law as it pertains to health professionals; consent for medical services, invasion of privacy, malpractice, governmental regulations, actions for collecting patient bills, bioethical, and end of life issues. F S Su
HCS 190 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism
3-0-3
Outer ear, disorders of outer ear, middle ear, tympanometry, disorders of middle ear, inner ear, and auditory pathways, cochlear and retrocochlear disorders. One of four courses required for persons applying for license as a hearing instrument dispenser. Prerequisite: approval of department chair. F S Su
HCS 191 Hearing Science
3-0-3
Physiological acoustics, psychological acoustics, hearing instrument candidacy, history, electronics, components and characteristics, digital technology. One of four courses required for persons applying for license as a hearing instrument dispenser. Prerequisite: approval of department chair. F S Su
HCS 192 Introduction to Audiology
3-0-3
Introduction to audiometry, pure tone audiometry, pure tone bone conduction tests, masking, hearing analysis (audiograms), speech testing, and speech discrimination tests. One of four courses required for persons applying for license as hearing instrument dispenser. Prerequisite: approval of department chair. F S Su
HCS 193 Aural Rehabilitation
3-0-3
ANSI standards, ear molds, fitting of hearing instruments, fitting verification, real ear measurement, post-fitting care, follow-up and rehabilitation, maintenance, modification, and repair. One of four courses required for persons applying for license as hearing instrument practitioner. Prerequisite: approval of department chair. F S Su
HCS 216 Career Program Medical Terminology
1-0-1
Medical vocabulary incorporating verbal usage, spelling, defining, and analysis of medical terms and abbreviations. Not a major overview of anatomy and physiology of the body systems. F S Su
HCS 236 Advanced Topics in Healthcare
1-0-1; 2-0-2; 3-0-3; 4-0-4-
The study of new and emerging healthcare topics requiring some healthcare background and preparation. Prerequisites to be determined by the faculty. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credit hours. F S Su
HCS 238 Work Experience in Health Care
0-20-5
Simulates the transition from school to work. Students are assigned full-shift experiences and are prepared for certification exams. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and enrollment in a health career program. F S Su

History
Social Sciences and Human Services
217/351-2229 • www.parkland.edu/sshs
HIS 101 History of Western Civilization I
4-0-4
(IAI S2 902, H2 901) Examination of the origins and development of major social, political, economic, and intellectual institutions of European civilization from the ancient cultures of Mediterranean world through 1715. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. F S
HIS 102 History of Western Civilization II
4-0-4
(IAI S2 903, H2 902) Examination of the origins and development of major social, political, economic, and intellectual institutions of European civilization from 1715 through the present. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. (3 credit hours in Salzburg program) S
HIS 104 History of the U.S. to 1877
4-0-4
(IAI S2 900, H2 904) Survey of American history from its European and Native American origins through Reconstruction. Emphasis on the economic, political, cultural, and social forces that have shaped the American past. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. F S
HIS 105 History of the U.S., 1877 to Present
4-0-4
(IAI S2 901, H2 905) Survey of American history from Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis on the economic, political, cultural, and social forces that have shaped the American past. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. F S Su
HIS 107 The History of Illinois
4-0-4
Illinois history from the earliest times to the present. Includes political, economic, social, cultural, educational, and constitutional developments. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. S Su
HIS 120 African American History to 1865
3-0-3
History of African American people in the United States from the African past to 1865. Emphasis on the changing economic, political, social, and cultural conditions of African Americans and on their contributions to American society. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. F
HIS 121 African American History from 1865 to Present
3-0-3
History of African American people in the United States from 1865 to the present. Emphasis on the changing economic, political, social, and cultural conditions of African Americans and on their contributions to American society. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. S
HIS 123 History of the Middle East
4-0-4
(IAI S2 918N) Examination of origins and development of geographic, social, political, economic, and religious forces which have contributed to the formation of major institutions in the Middle East from the appearance of cultural complexity to modern times. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. S
HIS 128 History of Asia and Pacific Region
4-0-4
(IAI S2 908N) Political, social, economic, and cultural history of Asia and the Pacific Region from ancient times to the present; responses and adaptations to Western influence, modernizations, and transformations to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. F
HIS 129 History of Africa
4-0-4
(IAI S2 906N) Origins and development of major geographical, social, political, economic, and religious forces which have contributed to the formation of major institutions in Africa from the appearance of humankind to modern times. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. S
HIS 140 History of Latin America
4-0-4
(IAI S2 910N) Origins and development of major geographic, social, political, and religious forces which have contributed to the formation of major institutions in Latin America from the era of Teotihuacan and the Olmec, Maya, Inca, and Aztec to the development of contemporary Latin American nations. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. F
HIS 145 History of the Labor Movement
3-0-3
Effects of labor on economic, political, and social systems of the United States.
HIS 165 Austrian Civilization
3-0-3
Introduction to Austrian history and culture from seventeenth century to present. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. (Salzburg Program only.)
HIS 166 British History I
3-0-3
Survey of British history to 1714: Roman and Anglo-Saxon invasions, Norman Conquest, Chaucer's England, and British-American relations. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. (Also in Canterbury Program) F
HIS 167 British History II
3-0-3
Survey of British history from 1714, including growth of the British Empire, the Irish question, the American Revolution, Victorian Britain, and contemporary Britain. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. (Also in Canterbury Program) S
HIS 168 Modern Europe in Transition
3-0-3
Examination of the continuities and discontinuities of European affairs since modern revolutions that set the stage for today's political discourse. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. (Salzburg Program only)
HIS 169 England in the Middle Ages
3-0-3
Study of medieval history focusing on events surrounding Norman Conquest of England in 1066. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. (Canterbury Program only)
HIS 203 The History of Women in America
3-0-3
A multicultural survey of the roles, experiences, and problems of American women from the colonial period to the present. The images and ideals of womanhood, nineteenth-century feminism, the Victorian woman and female sexuality, women at work, women at war, suffrage movement, and the new feminism. Prerequisite: ENG 099 placement. F S
HIS 289 Topics in History
3-0-3
Study of selected topics in history. Topics vary according to section and semester and are listed in the class schedule. Students may also request topics. A total of 6 credit hours may be taken in topics courses numbered 289, but HIS 289 is not repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement and 3 credit hours in the discipline.

Hospitality Industry
Business and Agri-Industries
217/351-2213 • www.parkland.edu/bai
HPI 110 Foodservice Sanitation Certification
1-0-1
Foodservice sanitation as it applies to every phase of foodservice operations. Emphasizes cleanliness and protection of the health of the public served as well as of the organization's staff. Includes certification exam. F S Su
HPI 111 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry
3-0-3
Overview of the hospitality industry focusing on the food service and lodging industries history and organization of hospitality industry with emphasis on career opportunities and management. Basic operational structures of restaurants, institutions, hotels, clubs, and resorts. F S
HPI 112 Food Standards and Production I
3-4-5
Expands on skills and knowledge to develop a strong foundation within culinary arts management. This course examines food handling techniques, preparation, and production. Includes kitchen laboratory experiences in meat, poultry, seafood, vegetables, soups and salads. Prerequisites: HPI 110 and HPI 116 or approval of program director. S
HPI 113 Food Service Systems
3-0-3
Management of food service systems in quick service, casual, fine dining, banquet, off-premise, and institutional service segments; various service procedures, staff organization, labor considerations, and management approaches. S
HPI 114 Human Resource Management and Supervision
3-0-3
Management methods use to lead and supervise staff. Skills and techniques used to form an effective staff for the hospitality environment. Self management, staff selection, orientation, training, motivating, evaluating and retention. Study of leadership characteristics. S
HPI 115 Menu Management and Design
2-2-3
The menu's role in controlling and directing a foodservice operation. Practical experience determining portion cost, product yields, selling price. Computer use to perform cost analysis of recipes, analysis of sale mix influence on profitability, and design of menus. F
HPI 116 Kitchen Basics
1-3-2
Survey of professional culinary standards and production methods. Lab experience with knife skills, mise en place and cooking methods. Proper use and maintenance of common commercial equipment. Foundational knowledge of classical cuisine preparation. Prerequisite: HPI 110 or approval of the instructor. F
HPI 117 Hospitality Managerial Accounting
3-0-3
Hospitality management's use of the balance sheet, income statement and statement of cash flow to analyze operational performance. Use of financial ratios to make business decisions. Topics include depreciation, ROI and ROA. Interpretation of markets forces on the unit operation. F
HPI 132 Resort and Event Operations
3-0-3
Examination of the resort segment of the lodging industry; tourism's relationship with types of resorts; quality service within the context of the hospitality industry. Event management and planning as a sub-function of resort operations. Su
HPI 139 Food Standards and Production II
2-4-4
Practical laboratory experiences with desserts, pastries and other bakery products, salads and dressings and will include group planning, production, presentation, and serving of complete guest meals. Prerequisites: HPI 110, HPI 116, or approval of program director or department chair. F
HPI 211 Food and Beverage Cost Management Systems
4-0-4
Examination of methods to measure product and labor costs. Use of Excel as a primary tool to collect and analyze data gathered from operational activities. Focus on controlling product costs. F
HPI 214 Hospitality Industry Seminar
2-0-2
Investigate and report on industry topics and trends. Prepare written evaluations of selected topics ranging from management and leadership to hospitality and culinary trends. Conduct Internet research to form personal opinions and support conclusions. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in HPI 215. S Su
HPI 215 Hospitality Industry Work Experience
0-20-4
Students perform 300 hours of work experience in approved hospitality facility related to their area of specialization. Prerequisites: HPI 111, completion of 15 semester credit hours in program area, and concurrent enrollment in HPI 214. S Su
HPI 216 Bar and Beverage Operations
3-0-3
Responsible management of beverage operations at a profit. Examination of planning, equipping, and staffing of beverage operations. Review of purchasing procedures, inventory control, pricing and marketing of all categories of alcohol beverages. Includes mixology training. S
HPI 230 Facilities Management/Building Operations Management
3-0-3
Facility management methods necessary to meet visitor and guest expectations of quality. Technical knowledge of the hotel/motel housekeeping department and building/facilities maintenance department. Supervision and training required to build a professional facilities team. S
HPI 231 Front Office Operations
3-0-3
Reservations, registration, rooming, guest relations, accounting, and night audit; guest complaints and security; staffing; and emphasis on automated systems, including computerized property management system exercise. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in HPI 111. F
HPI 233 Hospitality and Travel Marketing
3-0-3
Planning and implementing effective marketing strategies to maximize revenues and guest satisfaction; direct sales, public relations, and advertising. Relationships of carriers, suppliers, and travel intermediaries. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in HPI 111. S
HPI 234 Hospitality Industry Law
3-0-3
Legal concepts for the hospitality manager to recognize in a preventative approach to avoid liability. Knowledge of the law improves guest service and awareness to potential hazards. Review of negligence, merchantability, contract, Dram Shop, and employment laws. S
HPI 237 Food Standards and Production III
2-4-4
Advanced methods of food production integrating menu planning, product costing, and culinary methods. Examination of station setup, work flow and equipment layout required for specific menu production. Additional course topics included international cuisine and nutritional considerations. Prerequisites: HPI 112 and HPI 139, or approval of program director or department chair. S
HPI 239 Catering and Food Production
1-4-3
Student management and experience in food production and service dynamics as they plan and operate special event catering and student cafes. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in HPI 237, or approval of program director or department chair. S

Horticulture / Landscape
Business and Agri-Industries
217/351-2213 • www.parkland.edu/bai
HRT 114 Introduction to Turfgrass Management
2-2-3
Introduction to turf and turfgrass management; germinating and developing turf grasses; techniques necessary for maintenance of healthy turf. Emphasis on proper cultural practices in the industry. F S
HRT 116 Introduction to Landscape Design
3-0-3
Methods and techniques of drafting and preparing basic landscape designs for residential and commercial settings; theory and practical experience in large- and small-scale design projects; overview of business aspects. F S
HRT 118 Horticulture Equipment Operation
2-2-3
Introduction to basic operation and maintenance of horticulture-related equipment; safe operation of equipment and use of safety materials. F
HRT 119 Landscape Construction and Maintenance
3-0-3
Construction methods for residential and commercial landscapes; techniques and uses of materials related to construction of various landscape features; use of construction materials and maintenance; reading and interpreting landscape plans and drainage techniques. S
HRT 130 Floral Design I
2-2-3
Introduces the art of floral design based on design elements and principles. Techniques and mechanics of constructing centerpieces, corsages, boutonnieres, and theme designs are practiced in hands-on labs. Flower identification and care and handling are covered.
HRT 211 Pest Management and Pruning Principles
2-2-3
Identification, control, and management of insects, weeds and diseases of landscape plant material. Including the pest, its life cycle, hosts, symptoms, diagnosis and controls. Basic tree and shrub pruning for plant maintenance. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in AGB 104. S
HRT 214 Advanced Turfgrass Management
2-2-3
Advanced management of turf and turfgrass with emphasis on stress physiology for both residential and athletic applications. Topics include pesticide and nutrient fate, irrigation, and techniques for preventing and repairing wear and tear. Prerequisites: AGB 104 and HRT 114. S
HRT 230 Floral Design II
2-2-3
Expands on concepts and skills learned in Floral Design I; How to take orders, conduct consultations, and order flowers wholesale. Designs focus on weddings and funerals and are practiced in hands-on labs. Prerequisite: HRT 130.
HRT 253 Herbaceous Plants
3-0-3
Identification, selection, use, and maintenance of herbaceous (perennial, biennial, and annual) plants in the landscape. Techniques in propagation, growth, and maintenance of herbaceous plants with emphasis on control of pests (weeds, insects, and disease). Prerequisite: AGB 104 or approval of department chair. S
HRT 254 Woody Ornamentals
3-0-3
Identification of deciduous trees, shrubs, and evergreens used primarily in landscaping. Techniques in propagation, growth, and maintenance of trees and shrubs with emphasis on transplanting, pruning, and control of pests. Prerequisite: AGB 104 or approval of instructor or department chair. Su
HRT 255 Landscape Graphic Design
3-0-3
Advanced landscape graphic design techniques; freehand sketching, preparing quick designs, perspective sketching, color drawing, and computer design. Review design processes, principles, and design techniques and apply them to commercial and residential situations. Prerequisite: HRT 116 or approval of department chair. S
HRT 256 Landscape Planting Design
3-0-3
Fundamentals of planting composition with emphasis on aesthetics, ecology, and utilitarian aspects. Incorporating plants as design elements to modify the landscape for various activities and different site situations. Prerequisites: credit or concurrent enrollment in HRT 116, HRT 253, HRT 254, and HRT 255.
HRT 257 Horticultural Business Management
3-0-3
Provides current and future managers of landscaping businesses the opportunity to understand latest methods of combining resources to operate successful businesses. Emphasis on crew/team management and financial issues, including pricing materials, project bidding, and estimating. Prerequisite: AGB 135. S
HRT 270 Greenhouse Crop Production
2-2-3
Production of various crops in the greenhouse environment, including flowers, herbs, and garden plants. Topics include propagation, cultural practices, and scheduling crop growth for target market periods. Hands-on experience in the greenhouse plus field trips. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in AGB 104.

Humanities
Humanities
217/351-2217 • www.parkland.edu/hum
HUM 101 Cultural Values in the Western World I
4-0-4
(IAI HF 902) Exploration of Western culture as expressed in art, literature, history, philosophy, and music from ancient world to Renaissance. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. (Also in Dijon Program) F Su
HUM 102 Cultural Values in the Western World II
4-0-4
(IAI HF 903) Exploration of Western culture as expressed in art, literature, history, philosophy, and music from Renaissance through contemporary period. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. (Also in Dijon Program) S
HUM 103 Cultural Values in the Eastern World
3-0-3
(IAI HF 904N) Exploration of East Asian cultures (Chinese, Japanese, Korean) as expressed in art, music, literature, history, and philosophy. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
HUM 104 Islamic Culture and Civilization
3-0-3
(IAI H2 903N) Exploration of Islamic culture as expressed in art, music, literature, history, society, and philosophy. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
HUM 105 Cultures and Civilization of Sub-Saharan Africa
3-0-3
(IAI HF 904N) Exploration of cultures in Sub-Saharan Africa as expressed in art, music, literature, history, and philosophy. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
HUM 106 Latin American Cultures and Civilizations
3-0-3
(IAI H2 903N) Exploration of Latin American cultures, including arts, history, literature, and social institutions. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. (Also in Costa Rica Program) F S Su
HUM 107 Introduction to Mexican Culture
3-0-3
(IAI H2 903N) Exploration of Mexican cultural heritage from the pre-Columbian era through the 20th century. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
HUM 109 Cultural Values of South Asia
3-0-3
(IAI HF 904N) Exploration of South Asian cultures (India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh) as expressed in art, music, literature, history, and philosophy. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
HUM 121 Women in Arts, Cultures, and Societies
3-0-3
(IAI HF 907D) Survey of representation of women in both traditional and popular arts and cultures (film, literature, music, television, visual art); emphasis on the relationship of such representation to the values, behaviors, and structures of societies. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
HUM 122 Native American Cultures of North America
3-0-3
Past and present Native American cultures through selected works of literature, history, visual art, music, and other contemporary forms of expression. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
HUM 123 The Irish Experience
3-0-3
Provides international students attending Carlow College an overview of Irish history, geography, religions, art and architecture, emigration, and their impact on contemporary Irish culture. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement or ENG 099 with a grade of B or higher. (Carlow, Ireland program only) F S
HUM 166 European Cities
3-0-3
Urban cultures and traditions of Europe. Survey of nine major cities in terms of historical development and changing aesthetic ideals. Includes some site visits. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. (Salzburg Program only) F S

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
HVC 111 Basic Air Conditioning
2-2-3
Fundamentals of operation for residential and light commercial air conditioning systems. Proper handling of refrigerants. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in ELT 150. F S
HVC 112 Basic Heating
2-2-3
Fundamentals of operation for residential and light commercial heating systems. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in ELT 150. F S
HVC 113 Residential HVAC Installation
2-2-3
Basic HVAC system components and operation concepts, component installation, gas piping, low voltage wiring, basic tool skills, job safety. F
HVC 114 Ductwork Fabrication
1-2-2
Basic tool skills, job safety, and fabrication techniques for HVAC ductwork components and systems. Prerequisite: MAT 060 or 094.
HVC 132 HVAC Pneumatic Control Systems
2-2-3
Fundamentals of installation, operation, and maintenance of pneumatic control systems for commercial HVAC systems. Prerequisite: HVC 111 or HVC 112. S
HVC 134 Commercial HVAC and Service
2-2-3
Installation, operation, maintenance, and service of commercial HVAC equipment. Prerequisites: HVC 151 and HVC 152. S
HVC 151 Basic Air Conditioning Service
3-2-4
Diagnostic techniques for residential and light commercial air conditioning and heat pump systems. Common maintenance and repair methods. Prerequisite: HVC 111.
HVC 152 Basic Heating Service
2-2-3
Diagnostic techniques for residential and light commercial heating systems. Common maintenance and repair methods. Prerequisite: HVC 112.

Independent Study

IND 288 Independent Study
1-4 credits-
Designed for students who desire a broader opportunity to examine a special problem or subject area in greater detail than the present course offerings allow. Projects may take the form of a reading course, an experiment, or any other program of learning planned jointly by student and instructor. Independent study may not be used as a substitute for any present course in the curriculum. Course may be repeated up to a total of 4 semester hours credit. Prerequisites: 3.0 program GPA at Parkland College, sophomore standing, at least two previous courses in the subject field area, and written consent of the instructor and department chair.

Ironworker
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
IRW 111 Orientation to Ironworking
2-0-2
Introduction to ironworking, math review, hazard communication, drug and alcohol awareness. Prerequisite: acceptance into ironworkers apprenticeship program.
IRW 112 Occupational Safety and Health
.5-1.5-1
Occupational Safety and Health Act 29 CFR 1926, common causes of accidents and fatalities in industry. Students practice applications of standards. Prerequisites: acceptance into ironworkers apprenticeship program and credit or concurrent enrollment in IRW 111.
IRW 113 Structural Blueprint Reading
3-3-4
Reading and interpreting drawings for structural steel construction, elements of drawings, and steel frame construction drawings, including specific drawings, plans, specific job applications. Prerequisite: IRW 112.
IRW 114 Structural Steel Erection
3-9-6
Aspects of erecting structural steel, including history of iron and steel, plans and drawings, preparing materials, selecting a raising gang, erection of components, and fastening components and detailing. Welding, burning, mobile cranes, tower cranes, and bridges. Prerequisite: IRW 113.
IRW 115 Post Tensioning
3-3-4
History of post tensioning; prestressing; advantages of post tensioning; post tensioning systems; anchors; placing drawings and supports, and unloading, handling, and placing tendons, wire, and bars. Stressing of strand tendons and wire tendons, grouting of bonded tendons, bridges, and the threadbar post tensioning system. Prerequisite: IRW 114.
IRW 116 Reinforcing Blueprint Reading
2-6-4
Concentrated areas include types and applications of reinforced concrete used in building road and bridge construction, fabricating, unloading, handling and storing reinforcing steel, and reading engineering and placing drawings. Prerequisite: IRW 115.
IRW 117 Rigging
3-3-4
History of rigging, fiber line, wire rope, splicing wire rope, chains, hardware, reeving, and slings. Safety rules and information for operation of rigging equipment; operation and assembly of cranes; examples of rigging jobs; use of helicopters in construction; miscellaneous rigging equipment; skids and rollers, and access structures. Prerequisite: IRW 116.
IRW 118 Ornamental Ironworking
2-6-4
Tools, subframing and steel supports, stairs, fire escapes, ladders, railings, fences, partitions, doors, fire doors, elevators, flagpoles, playground equipment, and swimming pool equipment. Also doorway, wall, vault, and building accessory installation; care and maintenance of aluminum, bronze, and stainless steel construction materials. Prerequisite: IRW 117.
IRW 119 Pre-Engineered Buildings
1-3-2
Beginning information and steps for the erection of a pre-engineered building. Includes various types of architectural design, reading blueprints and instruction manuals, and layout procedures for a building including erection procedures, fasteners and anchors, and cost determination. Prerequisite: IRW 118.

Italian
Humanities
217/351-2217 • www.parkland.edu/hum
ITA 101 Beginning Italian I
4-0-4
For students with no previous and/or little instruction in Italian. Development of basic communicative skills. Emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and on Italian culture. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
ITA 102 Beginning Italian II
4-0-4
Continued development of communicative skills. Emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and Italian culture. Prerequisite: ITA 101 or equivalent. F S
ITA 110 Introduction to Basic Italian I
2-0-2
For students with no previous formal instruction in Italian. Basic Italian with attention to oral communication, culture, and the language needs of the student, traveler, and worker. F S Su
ITA 112 Introduction to Basic Italian II
2-0-2
Continued basic Italian with attention to oral communication, culture, and the language needs of the student, traveler, and worker. Prerequisite: ITA 110 or equivalent. F S

Japanese
Humanities
217/351-2217 • www.parkland.edu/hum
JPN 101 Beginning Japanese I
5-0-5
Development of basic and oral and written communications skills in Japanese: speaking, listening, reading, writing; emphasis on Japanese culture. For students with no previous instruction in Japanese. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F
JPN 102 Beginning Japanese II
5-0-5
Continued development of basic oral and written communications skills in Japanese: speaking, listening, reading, writing; emphasis on Japanese culture. Prerequisite: JPN 101 or equivalent. S
JPN 103 Intermediate Japanese I
5-0-5
Development of intermediate-level communications skills in Japanese: grammar, vocabulary, conversation, reading, and writing; emphasis on Japanese culture. Prerequisite: JPN 102 or equivalent. F
JPN 104 Intermediate Japanese II
5-0-5
(IAI H1 900) Continued development of intermediate-level communication skills in Japanese: grammar, vocabulary, conversation, reading, and writing; emphasis on Japanese culture. Prerequisite: JPN 103 or equivalent. S

Kinesiology
Natural Sciences
217/351-2285 • www.parkland.edu/ns
KIN 101 Personal Fitness Training I
3-3-4
Fitness testing protocols and norms, client consultation, and the design of exercise prescription for a diverse clientele in the following areas: resistance training, cardiovascular exercise, plyometrics, speed training, nutrition and weight control, flexibility, stability ball, and body-weight exercises. Prerequisites: credit or concurrent enrollment in BIO 111 or BIO 121 and approval of department chair. F
KIN 103 Exercise Fitness
0-2-1
Emphasis on activities leading to an individualized fitness program. Activities include cycling, treadmill, elliptical, and the use of strength training equipment. No concurrent enrollment in KIN 147, 203, or 247. Repeatable for a maximum of 2 credit hours. F S Su
KIN 110 Fundamntls Review Personl Trnr
1.5-1-2
Review of the structure and function of the body as it relates to human movement in the personal training setting. Intended for students pursuing an accelerated personal fitness training certificate. Prerequisite: approval of department chair or program director.
KIN 124 Golf I
0-2-1
Basic skills and elementary theory of golf. S Su
KIN 141 Beginning Basketball
0-2-1
Basic skills and elementary theory of basketball. F S
KIN 145 Aerobic Dancing
0-2-1
Contemporary physical fitness program consisting of dances made up of easy-to-learn steps and step patterns performed to various types of music. Individuals progress at their own rate. Repeatable for a maximum of 2 credit hours. F S Su
KIN 147 Weight Training
0-2-1
Fundamentals of strength training and conditioning through the use of free weights with emphasis on proper lifting techniques. No concurrent enrollment in KIN 103, 203, or 247. Repeatable for a maximum of 2 credit hours. F S Su
KIN 160 Introduction to Kinesiology
3-0-3
Professional opportunities available in the field of kinesiology, including physical education, recreation, safety, intramural and intercollegiate athletics; role of physical education and physical activity in total education; development of vocational objectives. This is the gateway course for the kinesiology program. F S
KIN 161 Basketball
1-2-2
Theory and practice in fundamentals and techniques of basketball with emphasis on skills and the theory and techniques of teaching and coaching basketball. F S
KIN 164 Introduction to Sports Psychology
3-0-3
Introduction to variables that affect motivation, goal setting, anxiety, and aggression in sport. Designed for individuals interested in applied psychological skills relevant to sport and performance. F S
KIN 168 Theories and Principles of Coaching
3-0-3
Theories and principles of coaching emphasizing motivation, practice, game preparation, professional certification/development, and administrative duties. Examines philosophies of notable coaches (Lombardi, Wooden, Robinson, Summit). Content applicable to all levels of competition. Eligible for certification via American Sport Education Program. F Su
KIN 181 Health Education
2-0-2
Personal health and wellness; nutrition, exercise, and stress; alcohol, tobacco, and drugs; and intimate relationships. Emphasis on strategies for modifying behaviors to achieve optimal personal wellness. F S Su
KIN 183 First Aid and CPR
2-0-2
Theory and techniques of first aid and CPR; emphasis on recognizing and responding to emergencies and developing skills needed to provide appropriate care. First Aid and CPR certification issued upon successful completion. F S Su
KIN 184 Introduction to Athletic Training
3-0-3
Introduction to athletic training including history of the profession, modalities, and the prevention, care, and treatment of athletic injuries. S
KIN 186 Introduction to Human Movement
1.5-1-2
Introduction to human movement through development of skills and knowledge relative to structure and function of the human body.
KIN 201 Personal Fitness Training II
3-5-5
Continuation of KIN 101 with an emphasis on special populations, including athletes, those with metabolic concerns, cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, injury rehabilitation, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and cerebral palsy. Also covers facility design and legal concerns. Prerequisites: BIO 111, KIN 101, and KIN 186 with grades of C or higher. S
KIN 203 Exercise Fitness II
0-2-1
Advanced concepts of training under the direction of a personal trainer from Parkland's PFT Program to improve fitness. Use of Parkland Fitness Center. No concurrent enrollment in KIN 103, 147, or 247. Repeatable for a maximum of 2 credit hours. Prerequisite: KIN 103 or current member of Parkland's intercollegiate athletic teams. F S Su
KIN 247 Weight Training II
0-2-1
Advanced concepts of strength training under the direction of a personal trainer from Parkland's PFT Program. Use of Parkland Fitness Center. No concurrent enrollment in KIN 103, 147, or 203. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credit hours. Prerequisite: KIN 147 or current member of Parkland's intercollegiate athletic teams. F S Su
KIN 262 Golf
1-2-2
Theory and practice of fundamentals, rules, and etiquette of golf with reference to teaching golf. S Su
KIN 263 Sports Officiating
2-2-3
Fundamentals, techniques, and philosophy of officiating. Emphasis on knowledge of rules for various sports. S
KIN 288 Exercise Physiology
3-3-4
Application of anatomy and physiology to human movement. How the body moves and physiological responses to exercise stress. Prerequisites: BIO 121 with a C or higher and concurrent enrollment in BIO 122, or BIO 111 with a C or higher. S

Kiswahili
Humanities
217/351-2217 • www.parkland.edu/hum
KIS 101 Beginning Kiswahili I
4-0-4
For students with no previous instruction in Kiswahili. Development of basic communicative skills. Emphasis on speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. Introduction to East African culture. Prerequisite: ENG 101. F
KIS 102 Beginning Kiswahili II
4-0-4
Continued development of basic reading, writing, and conversational skills. Reading of simple prose and study of East African culture. Prerequisite: KIS 101 or equivalent. S
KIS 103 Intermediate Kiswahili I
4-0-4
Development of an intermediate-level understanding and competency in Kiswahili. Increased emphasis on vocabulary, prose, listening, speaking, and writing. Prerequisite: KIS 102 or equivalent. F
KIS 104 Intermediate Kiswahili II
4-0-4
(IAI H1 900) Development of an intermediate-level understanding and competency in Kiswahili. Continued study of East African culture and history. Increased emphasis on vocabulary, prose reading, listening, speaking, and writing. Prerequisite: KIS 103 or equivalent. S

Liberal Arts and Sciences
Humanities
217/351-2217 • www.parkland.edu/hum
LAS 111 Information Literacy
1-0-1
Introduction to research and information skills needed for college success. Find and evaluate information tools and learn about the legal and ethical issues related to life in the information age. F S
LAS 189 Introduction to Liberal Arts and Sciences
3-0-3
Study of selected major works from the sciences, humanities, arts, and social sciences organized by themes and examined from humanities perspectives. Students learn the Inquiry Method for analysis and interpretation, and they relate concepts and themes to their own lives. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su

Laborer
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
LBR 111 Orientation to Laborers Craft
1-2-2
Work zone flagger training, sun sense, math review, back injury prevention, construction rigging and knot tying, hazard communication, drug and alcohol awareness. Prerequisite: admission to Laborers Apprenticeship program.
LBR 112 Occupational Safety and Health
.5-1.5-1
Occupational Safety and Health Act 29 CFR 1926, common causes of accidents and fatalities in industry. Students practice applications of standards. Prerequisite: admission to Laborers Apprenticeship program.
LBR 113 Mason Tending
2-2-3
Practices and procedures of mason tending including scaffold erection, stocking techniques, mixing mortar and grout, and forklift operation. Prerequisite: admission to Laborers Apprenticeship program and First Aid/CPR certification.
LBR 114 Concrete Practices and Procedures
2-2-3
Concrete materials and mix proportions, tools and equipment used with concrete, finishing techniques, curing and protection of concrete. Prerequisite: admission to Laborers Apprenticeship program.
LBR 115 Asphalt Technology and Construction
2-2-3
Asphalt technology and construction, flagger certification, manual tape application, paint striping operator, carbide asphalt grinder. Prerequisite: admission to Laborers Apprenticeship program and First Aid/CPR certification.
LBR 116 Apprenticeship I
0-24-3
On-the-job component of Laborers Apprenticeship program; work related to skills learned in the classroom including mason tending, concrete procedures and asphalt use. All work activities performed under direct supervision of journeyman. Prerequisite: admission to Laborers Apprenticeship program.
LBR 131 Principles of Pipelaying
2-2-3
Principles of pipe laying including gravity flow piping systems, batter boards, sewer lasers, utility lines and grades, review of metric system. Prerequisites: LBR 111, LBR 112, LBR 113, LBR 114, LBR 115, LBR 116, and second year status in Laborers Apprenticeship program.
LBR 133 Asbestos Abatement
2-2-3
Asbestos abatement principles and practice, approved by Illinois Department of Public Health/EPA accredited. Prerequisites: LBR 111, LBR 112, LBR 113, LBR 114, LBR 115, LBR 116, and second-year status in Laborers Apprenticeship program.
LBR 136 Apprenticeship II
0-24-3
On-the-job component of Laborers Apprenticeship program; work related to skills learned in the classroom including mason tending, concrete procedures, asphalt use pipe laying, asbestos abatement, and blueprint reading. All work activities performed under direct supervision of journeyman. Prerequisite: second-year status in Laborers Apprenticeship program.
LBR 139 Highway Construction Plan Reading
3-0-3
Reading and interpreting highway construction plans and specifications. S
LBR 150 Basic Construction Surveying
1-2-2
Basic instrument methods and computations for leveling applications and site-work construction layout; level circuits, slope staking, baselines and offsets, building and utility layout. S
LBR 152 Bridges
2-2-3
Methods of bridge construction, renovation, and demolition for the laborer. Prerequisites: LBR 131, LBR 133, LBR 136, CIT 139, and third-year status in Laborers Apprenticeship program.
LBR 153 Hazardous Waste
4-2-4
Hazardous waste training for the Laborers Apprentice. Prerequisites: LBR 131, LBR 133, LBR 136, CIT 139, and third-year status in the Laborers Apprenticeship program.
LBR 156 Apprenticeship III
0-24-3
On-the-job component of Laborers Apprenticeship program; work related to skills learned in the classroom including mason tending, concrete procedures, asphalt use, pipe laying, asbestos abatement, and blueprint reading, surveying, bridge construction, and hazardous waste handling. All work activities performed under direct supervision of journeyman. Prerequisite: third-year status in Laborers Apprenticeship program.
LBR 250 Labor Management Development
3-0-3
Analysis of leadership skills (motivation, planning, communication, conflict resolution). Personal development required for career advancement.
LBR 251 Special Project I
3-0-3
Designed by the student and supervisor to develop special skills and talents in the field of choice. Prerequisites: completion of trade certificate and consent of department chair.
LBR 252 Special Project II
3-0-3
Designed by the student and supervisor to develop special skills and talents in the field of choice. Prerequisites: completion of trade certificate, recommendation of apprenticeship instructor, and consent of department chair.
LBR 253 Special Project III
3-0-3
Designed by the student and supervisor to develop special skills and talents in the field of choice. Prerequisites: completion of trade certificate, recommendation of union leadership, and consent of department chair.
LBR 271 Trade Apprenticeship I
0-24-3
Supervisory and management projects and activities. On-the-job experience in the selected field. All work activities will be done under direct supervision of a foreman and will consist of those required of a journeyman. Students may not receive credit for this course and the course in their trade curriculum. Prerequisites: approval of department chair and appropriate union management.
LBR 272 Trade Apprenticeship II
0-24-3
Supervisory and management projects and activities. On-the-job experience in the selected field. All work activities will be done under direct supervision of a journeyman and will consist of those required of a journeyman. Students may not receive credit for this course and the course in their trade curriculum. Prerequisites: approval of department chair and appropriate union management.
LBR 273 Trade Apprenticeship III
0-24-3
Supervisory and management projects and activities. On-the-job experience in the selected field. All work activities will be done under direct supervision of a foreman and will consist of those required of a journeyman. Students may not receive credit for this course and the course in their trade curriculum. Prerequisites: approval of department chair and appropriate union management.
LBR 274 Trade Apprenticeship IV
0-24-3
Supervisory and management projects and activities. On-the-job experience in the selected field. All work activities will be done under direct supervision of a foreman, and will consist of those required of a journeyman. Students may not receive credit for this course and the course in their trade curriculum. Prerequisites: approval of department chair and appropriate union management.
LBR 291 Fundamentals of Concrete Practices
1-2-2
Safety, construction math and measurements, project planning and site preparation. Prerequisite: admission to Concrete Specialist program and LBR 111.
LBR 292 Concrete Apprenticeship I
0-24-3
On-the-job component of the Concrete Specialist program; work related to skills covered in classroom including safety practices, project planning and site preparation. All work activities under direct supervision of journeyman. Prerequisite: admission to Concrete Specialist program and LBR 291.
LBR 293 Forming, Placing, and Finishing Concrete
2-3-3
Forming techniques, placing concrete, and various finishing techniques. Prerequisite: LBR 292.
LBR 294 Concrete Apprenticeship II
0-16-2
On-the-job component of the Concrete Specialist program; work skills related to forming, placing, consolidating, finishing and clean up of concrete projects, including repair. All work activities under direct supervision of journeyman. Prerequisite: LBR 293.

Literature
Humanities
217/351-2217 • www.parkland.edu/hum
LIT 120 Introduction to Literature
3-0-3
(IAI H3 900) Reading and analysis of literature from a variety of literary forms and periods; developing personal critical judgment about literature, as well as familiarity with different approaches to literary analysis. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
LIT 121 Introduction to Poetry
3-0-3
(IAI H3 903, EGL 915) Reading and analysis of poetry of various types and from various periods. Development of vocabulary to discuss poetic meanings, forms, and techniques. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. (Also in Canterbury Program) F S Su
LIT 125 Introduction to Shakespeare
3-0-3
(IAI H3 905) Reading and analysis of Shakespearean comedy, history, tragedy, romance, and sonnets. Includes viewing and analysis of at least one film adaptation. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. (Also in Canterbury Program) F S Su
LIT 126 Introduction to Drama
3-0-3
(IAI H3 902, EGL 916) Reading and discussion of plays of various types from classical to modern drama, with some attention to dramatic and theatre criticism. Includes examination of aesthetic and cultural dimensions of various dramatic forms. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
LIT 127 Introduction to Fiction
3-0-3
(IAI H3 901, EGL 917) Reading and discussion of short stories, novels, and other works of fiction, with some attention to critical approaches. Includes examination of aesthetic and cultural dimensions. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S Su
LIT 130 Introduction to Children's Literature
3-0-3
Introduction to the classics of children's literature to develop personal critical judgment and skill in analyzing these works as literary and artistic achievements. (Canterbury Program only)
LIT 141 Introduction to African-American Literature
3-0-3
(IAI H3 910D) A survey of literature by African American writers, exploring the formation of racial/cultural identity, and developing a broader historical understanding of the cultural experiences expressed. Exploration of poems, novels, plays, speeches, and other texts. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
LIT 142 Women in Literature
3-0-3
(IAI H3 911D) Study of women writers and exploration of the experiences of women presented in literature, the construction of gender identity, and the evolution of the female voice as found in poetry, drama, and fiction. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F
LIT 146 Introduction to Non-Western Literature
3-0-3
(IAI H3 908N, EGL 919) Introduction to literature from a variety of epochs and cultures, such as Africa, Asia, Middle East, and Caribbean. An emphasis on the intellectual, social, and political contexts of the works. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
LIT 147 Introduction to African Literature
3-0-3
(IAI H3 908N, EGL 919) Reading and discussion of oral and written literature of Africa with attention to social, historical, political, and cultural contexts. Selections from pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial periods will be included, with emphasis on poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama of twentieth-century sub-Saharan Africa. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F
LIT 148 Introduction to Latin American Literature
3-0-3
(IAI H3 908N) Reading and discussion of major works of Latin American fiction and poetry in English translation, considered in the context of Latin American historical, cultural, and literary traditions. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement. F S
LIT 149 Modern Irish Literature
3-0-3
Examine the manner in which language, history, politics, culture, and identity interrelated in late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century Ireland, and their impact on the development of contemporary literature. Prerequisite: ENG 101 placement or ENG 099 with a grade of B or higher. (Carlow, Ireland program only) F S
LIT 201 English Literature I
3-0-3
(IAI H3 912, EGL 913) Survey and critical analysis of works of English literature before 1785, focusing on literary movements and genre delineation, intellectual, historical, cultural, and linguistic background, and emphasizing thematic and structural elements in the works. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or one semester of LIT. (Also in Canterbury Program) F
LIT 202 English Literature II
3-0-3
(IAI H3 913, EGL 914) Survey and critical analysis of works of English literature from 1785 to the present, in focusing on literary movements and genre delineation, intellectual, historical, cultural, and linguistic background, and emphasizing thematic and structural elements in the works. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or one semester of LIT. (Also in Canterbury Program) S
LIT 204 American Literature I
3-0-3
(IAI H3 914, EGL 911) Survey and critical analysis of works illustrating the development of American literature through the Civil War, including exploration of literary movements, as well as the intellectual, social, political, and historical contexts of the literature. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or one semester of LIT. (Also in Canterbury Program) F
LIT 205 American Literature II
3-0-3
(IAI H3 915, EGL 912) Survey and critical analysis of works illustrating the development of American literature from the Civil War to the present, including exploration of literary movements, as well as the intellectual, social, political, and historical contexts of the literature. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or one semester of LIT. (Also in Canterbury Program) S

Licenced Practical Nurse

LPN 111 Introduction to Nursing
1-0-1
Emphasizes effective therapeutic communication, time management, and critical thinking skills. Legal and ethical considerations in nursing will also be incorporated. Prerequisite: admission into the LPN program; credit or concurrent enrollment in BIO 121; and concurrent enrollment in LPN 114 and LPN 117. F S
LPN 114 Nursing Fundamentals
4-6-6-
Introduction to nursing process, functional health patterns, planning of care, and normal age-related changes. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in LPN 111, LPN 117, and BIO 121. F S
LPN 117 Nursing Pharmacology
3-0-3
Intro to principles of nursing pharmacology and pharmacological agents relating to managing disease states. Nursing-specific interventions pertaining to medication administration and nursing practice. Prerequisite: admission to the program and credit or concurrent enrollment in LPN 111, LPN 114, and BIO 121. F S
LPN 118 Health Alterations I
3-6-5-
Utilizes the nursing process for providing care to adults presenting with common functional or health deviations. Prerequisites: completion of all first semester courses and credit or concurrent enrollment in BIO 122, DTP 120 or DTP 150, and HCS 136. S Su
LPN 130 Transition to Practice
1-0-1
Transition from a scholastic environment to a professional role. Prerequisites: completion of all 1st and 2nd semester courses and concurrent enrollment in PSY 209 and ENG 101, or LPN 131, LPN 132, and LPN 135. S Su
LPN 131 Health Alterations II
3-6-5-
Uses the nursing process for providing care to adults with complex functional or health deviations. Prerequisites: completion of all 3rd semester program courses and concurrent enrollment in LPN 132 and LPN 135. F Su
LPN 132 Licensure Preparation
1-0-1
Legal requirements of the licensure process and the practical nurse's responsibilities under the Illinois Nurse Practice Act. Prerequisites: completion of all 3rd semester courses and concurrent enrollment in LPN 131 and LPN 135. F S
LPN 135 Nursing in Pediatrics and Obstetrics
4-6-6-
Care of pregnant women, newborns, infants, children and adolescents. Normal physiological processes as well as health alterations are presented. Prerequisites: completion of all 3rd semester courses and concurrent enrollment in LPN 131 and LPN 132. F S Su

Health Professions
217/351-2224 • www.parkland.edu/hp
LSS 210 Dysrhythmia Certification
3-0-3
Prepares professionals to be certified to work in monitored acute care areas and analyze cardiac strips. Prerequisite: completion of first year of a health professions program or permission of instructor. F S Su
LSS 211 Advanced Cardiac Life Support
1-0-1
Certifies healthcare professionals to direct or participate in the management of cardiopulmonary arrest or other cardiovascular emergencies. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. F S Su

Health Professions
217/351-2224 • www.parkland.edu/hp
MAS 116 Point of Care Testing
1-0-1
Fundamentals of basic laboratory testing at point-of-care setting: necessity, training, competency, instrument or test selection, advantages and disadvantages, and compliance. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in MAS 135 (formerly HCS 135) or approval of program director. F S Su
MAS 135 Introduction to Medical Assisting
3-3-4
Skills used in medical assisting: communication, safety, infection control, basic assessment, equipment, basic anatomy and physiology, and basic first aid. Prerequisites: admission into the medical assisting program, CCS 099 placement, ENG 101 placement, and MAT 080 placement or MAT 095 placement. F S
MAS 156 Aseptic Techniques
1-3-2
Fundamentals of microbial control; procedures for sanitation, disinfection, and sterilization; specimen collection and handling; compliance with Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA), the U.S. Center for Communicable Disease Control (CDC), assisting with minor surgery. Prerequisites: admission into the medical assisting program and MAS 135 (formerly HCS 135) and HCS 154, or approval of program director or department chair. F S Su
MAS 158 Administration of Medication
1-2-2
Principles and procedures for administration of medications; legal aspects, mathematical review; emphasis on routes of drug administration. Prerequisites: MAS 135 (formerly HCS 135) or CCS 099 placement, ENG 101 placement, and MAT 080 placement or MAT 095 placement, and approval of program director. F S Su
MAS 170 Medical Assisting Practicum
0-18-3-
Application of clinical skills, procedures, and knowledge derived from medical assisting courses. Prerequisite: completion of all required program courses with a grade of C or higher and approval of program director. F S Su

Mathematics
Mathematics
217/351-2225 • www.parkland.edu/math
Assessment Program
Parkland College is committed to helping students achieve success in their course work. In this effort, the college has designed a mathematics assessment program to aid students in selecting the most appropriate mathematics course while taking into account wide and varied backgrounds. Assessment or credit in the listed prerequisite course is required prior to registering in any mathematics course. Assessment scores are valid for only two years; thereafter, the student must be reassessed.Students with transfer credit in mathematics are not required to take the assessment, but can be placed on the basis of mathematics credits earned within the last five years (after a review of transcripts).
MAT 060 Pre-Algebra Skills
4-0-4
Ratio, proportion, percent, conversion of units, area, perimeter, signed numbers, order of operations, formulas, basic equations, basic exponent laws, word phrases, and basic word problems. Prerequisite: assessment. F S Su
MAT 070 Mathematical Literacy A
3-0-3
First course in algebra, for programs not requiring college algebra. Operations with polynomials, greatest common factor, introduction to functions, graphical analysis, models of growth, and data representation. Prerequisite: MAT 060 or MAT 094 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 071 Mathematical Literacy B
3-0-3
Continuation of MAT 070. Linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, scientific notation, modeling with functions and equations and basic data interpretation. Emphasis on applications and problem solving. Prerequisite: MAT 070 with grade of C or higher. F S Su
MAT 080 Beginning Algebra A
2.5-0-2.5
First course in basic algebra. The real number line, equations, modeling and applications, linear equations, the coordinate plane, and multiple approaches to problem solving. Prerequisite: MAT 060 or MAT 094 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 081 Beginning Algebra B
2.5-0-2.5
Second course in basic algebra. Inequalities, exponents (positive, negative, zero), scientific notation, operations with polynomials and an introduction to factoring, linear systems of two equations, absolute value equations and inequalities, and multiple approaches to problem solving. Prerequisite: MAT 080 with a grade of C or higher. F S Su
MAT 085 Intermediate Algebra A
2.5-0-2.5
Relations, functions, graphs and their analysis, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations and inequalities, quadratic functions, and modeling and applications. Credit not given for both MAT 085/086 and MAT 098, MAT 099, or MAT 134. Prerequisite: MAT 071, MAT 081, or MAT 095 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 086 Intermediate Algebra B
2.5-0-2.5
Radicals, algebra of radical expressions, rational exponents, algebraic fractions, equations, modeling and applications, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Credit not given for both MAT 085/086 and MAT 099 or MAT 134. Prerequisite: MAT 085 with grade of C or higher. F S Su
MAT 097 Geometry
4-0-4
First course in plane geometry; logical reasoning and proofs, angle-line relationships, triangles, congruence and similarity, polygons, the Pythagorean Theorem, arc-angle and segment relationships in circles, constructions, area, and space geometry. Prerequisite: MAT 071, MAT 081, or MAT 095 with grade of C or higher, assessment, or approval of department chair. F S Su
MAT 105 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I
3-0-3
Concepts and structures of real, rational, and integer numbers; sets; logic; development of numeration systems; and problem-solving techniques. Does not satisfy general education elective for any transfer program. Prerequisites: passage of a computational mastery test, MAT 097 with grade of C or higher (or high school equivalent), and either MAT 086, MAT 098, or MAT 099 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F
MAT 106 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II
3-0-3
(IAI M1 903) Continuation of MAT 105. Concepts from number theory, probability, statistics, geometry, measurement, and non-metric geometry. Satisfies the general education requirements only for students seeking state certification as elementary teachers. Prerequisite: passage of a computational mastery test, MAT 097 with grade of C or higher (or high school equivalent), and either MAT 086, MAT 098, or MAT 099 with grade of C or higher or assessment. S
MAT 107 General Education Mathematics
3-0-3
(IAI M1 904) For non-mathematics, non-science, and non-business majors, mathematical reasoning and solving real-life problems using logic and set theory, mathematics of finance, probability, and statistics. Prerequisites: MAT 071 with a grade of C or higher or the following: MAT 097 with grade of C or higher (or high school equivalent) and either MAT 086, MAT 098, or MAT 099 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 108 Introduction to Applied Statistics
3-0-3
(IAI M1 902) Basic statistical principles, graphic presentation, descriptive measures of central tendency, dispersion and location, inferential statistics and hypothesis testing, analysis and inference of linear correlation coefficient, and slope of regression line. Credit not given for both MAT 108 and MAT 160. Prerequisites: MAT 071 with grade of C or higher or the following: MAT 097 with grade of C or higher (or high school equivalent) and either MAT 086, MAT 098, or MAT 099 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 110 Business Mathematics
3-0-3
Use of a scientific calculator; basic arithmetic operations, percentages, payroll, simple and compound interest, annuities, sinking funds, promissory notes, discounting, depreciation, merchandising, retailing, reconciliation, installment loans, periodic loans, mortgage loans, elementary descriptive statistics, and spreadsheet applications. Prerequisite: MAT 060 or MAT 094 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 117 Algebra for Calculus
2-0-2
Brief review course in preparation for MAT 128 or MAT 143; includes basic geometric formulas, word problems and corresponding equations, algebraic skills needed to simplify common calculus expressions, and graphing techniques. For students who have withdrawn from MAT 128 or MAT 143 or students who have placed beyond MAT 124 and need review. Prerequisite: recommendation of instructor, advisor, or department chair. F S
MAT 124 College Algebra
4-0-4
Relations and functions; linear, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic models; radicals and complex numbers; systems of equations and matrix methods; determinants and Cramer's Rule; sequences and series; and binomial theorem. Prerequisites: MAT 097 with grade of C or higher (or high school equivalent) and either MAT 086 with grade of C or higher, MAT 098 with grade of B or higher, or MAT 099 with grade of B or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 125 College Trigonometry
3-0-3
(IAI MTM 901) Trigonometric functions, fundamental identities, graphing, solving trigonometric equations, inverse trigonometric functions, complex numbers, and vectors. Prerequisites: MAT 097 (or high school equivalent) and MAT 124 with grade of C or higher or concurrent enrollment in MAT 124, or assessment. F S Su
MAT 126 Precalculus Mathematics
5-0-5
Relations and functions; linear, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic models; radicals and complex numbers; systems of equations; trigonometric functions; fundamental identities; graphing; solving trigonometric equations; and inverse trigonometric functions. Credit will not be given for both MAT 126 and MAT 124-125. Prerequisites: MAT 097 with grade of C or higher (or high school equivalent) and either MAT 086 with grade of C or higher, MAT 098 with grade of B or higher, or MAT 099 with grade of B or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 128 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
5-0-5
(IAI M1 900-1, EGR 901, MTH 901) Derivative and its applications; integral and its applications; limits and continuity; trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and hyperbolic functions. Credit not given for both MAT 128 and MAT 143. Prerequisites: MAT 124 and MAT 125 with grade of C or higher in both or MAT 126 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 129 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
4-0-4
(IAI M1 900-2, EGR 902, MTH 902) Conic sections, polar coordinates, methods of integration, applications of integration, parametric equations, indeterminate forms, infinite series. Prerequisite: MAT 128 with grade of C or higher. F S Su
MAT 131 Applied Mathematics
3-0-3; 4-0-4-
Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and signed numbers; percents; measurement; scientific notation; calculators; equations; formulas; graphs; ratio and proportion; metric system; polynomials; plane and solid figures and their formulas; systems of equations; basic statistics; and right triangle trigonometry. Prerequisite: MAT 060 or MAT 094 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S
MAT 134 Technical Mathematics I
4-0-4
Mathematics used in technical applications. Fundamental algebraic and geometric concepts and operations, measurement, metric system, ratio, proportion, variation, functions and graphs, right triangle trigonometry, systems of linear equations, factoring, and algebraic fractions; quadratic equations, exponents and radicals, exponentials and logarithms. Credit not given for both MAT 098 and MAT 134. Prerequisite: MAT 071, MAT 081, or MAT 095 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S
MAT 135 Technical Mathematics II
3-0-3
(IAI MTM 901) Trigonometric functions; solution of right triangles and oblique triangles, basic trigonometric formulas and identities; inverse trig functions; applications using vectors; systems of linear and non-linear equations with technical applications. Prerequisite: MAT 134 or equivalent with grade of C or higher. S
MAT 141 Finite Mathematics
4-0-4
(IAI M1 906) Sets, combinatorial analysis, theory of probability, linear programming, vectors, matrices, and Markov chains. Not recommended for mathematics/science transfer students. Prerequisite: MAT 124 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 143 Calculus for Business and Social Sciences
4-0-4
(IAI M1 900-B) Mathematical analysis of polynomial calculus with applications to business and social sciences; algebraic review, derivatives and integrals of algebraic functions, limit and continuity theory, logarithmic and exponential functions, and partial derivatives. Credit not given for both MAT 143 and MAT 128. Prerequisite: MAT 124 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 145 Linear Algebra for Business
4-0-4
(IAI M1 906) Basic concepts and techniques of linear algebra: systems of linear equations, inequalities, matrices, determinants, vectors, and eigenvalues; linear algebra applications: linear programming, simplex method, Markov chains, and Leontief models. Credit not given for both MAT 145 and MAT 220. Prerequisite: MAT 124 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 151 Mathematics for Health Careers
2-0-2
Review of fractions, decimals, and percents; household, apothecary, and metric systems of measurement; ratio and proportion; infusion rates; units of drug measurement; stock solutions and dilutions; dosage and concentration application problems. Prerequisite: MAT 060 or MAT 094 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 160 Statistics
4-0-4
(IAI M1 902, BUS 901) Data organization, distributions, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, probability functions, sampling, the normal distribution, expected value, estimation, hypothesis testing, student's t-test, chi-square analysis, analysis of variance, regression, correlation, nonparametric methods and decision theory with applications. Credit not given for both MAT 108 and MAT 160. Prerequisite: MAT 124 with grade of C or higher or assessment. F S Su
MAT 200 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
3-0-3
(IAI M1 905, CS 915) Introduction to discrete mathematics, sets, functions, logic, proofs, Boolean algebra, combinatorics, probability, recurrence relations, trees, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MAT 124 with grade of C or higher or assessment. S
MAT 220 Linear Algebra
3-0-3
(IAI MTH 911) Vector spaces, subspaces, linear independence, basis, dimension, linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, matrices, and determinants. Credit not given for both MAT 145 and MAT 220. Prerequisite: credit or concurrent enrollment in MAT 228 with grade C or higher or approval of department chair. S
MAT 228 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
4-0-4
(IAI M1 900-3, EGR 903, MTH 903) Three-dimensional vectors, solid analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line integrals, Green's theorem, surface integrals, divergence theorem, and Stokes' theorem. Prerequisite: MAT 129 with grade of C or higher. F S Su
MAT 229 Differential Equations and Introductory Matrix Theory
5-0-5
(IAI EGR 904, MTH 912) Matrices and inverses, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors; solution methods for first-order and higher order linear differential equations; systems of linear differential equations; Laplace transforms; numerical methods; elementary power series methods; and applications. Prerequisite: MAT 228 with grade C or higher or approval of department chair. F S Su

Industrial/Manufacturing Technology
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
MFT 110 Mechanical Assemblies
2-2-3
Interpreting documentation for assembly and installation requirements; fundamentals of power transmission; basic and precision measuring tools; fasteners, tools, and torque specifications; bearing types and applications; seals; gaskets; lubrication. F
MFT 113 Introduction to Hydraulics and Pneumatics
3-0-3
Introduction to theory and applications of fluid and pneumatic power transfer and control. S
MFT 114 Introduction to Pneumatics
1-2-2
Introduction to theory and applications of pneumatic power transfer and control. Typical components and systems are included, e.g., pumps, valves, filters.
MFT 116 Introduction to Hydraulics
1-2-2
Introduction to theory and applications of fluid power transfer, generation, and control. Typical components, e.g., pumps, check valves, and filters.
MFT 117 Pumps, Compressors and Vacuum Systems
2-2-3
Theory and operation of centrifugal and metering pumps, piston and rotary type compressors, safety valves, pressure regulators, oil and water separators, and dryers. Vacuum pumps, surfaces and cups, gauges. S
MFT 119 Introduction to Industrial Technology
2-2-3
Introductory skills in the following areas: manual machine tool operation, computer numerical control (CNC) programming, pneumatics, hydraulics, and welding.
MFT 121 Basic Machine Processes
2-2-3
(IAI MTM 921) General machining procedures including basic operations of lathe and mill. Basic bench work operations including layout and hand tools. Basic machine tool projects using cross section of machine tool equipment. F S
MFT 122 Intermediate Machine Processes
2-2-3
(IAI MTM 922) Setup and operational procedures of mills, grinders, and lathes. Cutting speeds, feed rates, tool geometry for various types of alloy steels. Prerequisite: MFT 121. F S
MFT 125 Principles and Processes of Modern Manufacturing
3-0-3
(IAI MTM 913) Introduction to principles involved and materials used in modern manufacturing. Analysis and comparison of several processes including cold and hot forming of metals, powder metallurgy, and plastic forming. Includes new processes and techniques.
MFT 127 Introduction to CNC Programming
4-0-4
(IAI MTM 915) Introduction to computer numerical control (CNC) and programming CNC machines. Emphasis on fundamentals of CNC lathe and mill operations and good programming practices. Prerequisite: MFT 121 or equivalent. S
MFT 128 Quality Assurance
3-0-3
(IAI MTM 914) Basic concepts of quality. Application of probability, statistics, and sampling for quality control, process control, and failure analysis. Military standards and reliability documents will be used to evaluate product performance and identify causes of failure. Prerequisite: MAT 071, MAT 081, or MAT 095. S
MFT 131 Introduction to Manufacturing
3-0-3
History, economics, employability skills, processes, and quality measurement as related to manufacturing. Emphasis on preparing student for co-op experience. F
MFT 133 Valves and Piping
2-2-3
Piping, tubing, connections and valve assemblies used in the control and transport of fluids in industry. S
MFT 138 Intermediate CNC Programming
4-0-4
Intermediate computer numerical control (CNC) 3-axis programming and operation; CNC mill and lathe operation and good programming practices. Prerequisite: MFT 127 or equivalent. S
MFT 151 Manufacturing Work Experience I
0-15-3
Co-op experience in manufacturing: work experience in manufacturing or related industries. Prerequisites: MFT 131 or equivalent and approval of department chair. F S Su
MFT 152 Manufacturing Work Experience II
0-15-3
Continuation of MFT 151. Work experience in manufacturing or related industries. Prerequisites: MFT 151 or equivalent and approval of department chair. F S Su
MFT 153 Manufacturing Work Experience III
0-15-3
Continuation of MFT 152. Work experience in manufacturing or related industries. Prerequisites: MFT 152 or equivalent and approval of department chair. F S Su
MFT 154 Manufacturing Work Experience IV
0-15-3
Continuation of MFT 153. Work experience in manufacturing or related industries. Prerequisites: MFT 153 or equivalent and approval of department chair. F S Su
MFT 210 Industrial Safety
3-0-3
Introduction to industrial and workplace safety topics in manufacturing, including lock-out/tag-out, confined space, fall protection, safe lifting, fire safety, material safety data sheets, personal protective equipment, and others. F
MFT 211 Advanced Machining Processes and Inspection Practices
3-2-4
Advanced manual machine tool operation and inspection practices. Prerequisite: MFT 122 or equivalent. F S
MFT 212 Industrial Maintenance Applications
2-2-3
Introduction to mechanical repair and preventative maintenance as applied to the manufacturing environment. Includes installation, troubleshooting, and repair procedures for a variety of mechanical power transmission equipment. Also includes leveling, anchoring, and adjustment of machine tools and other equipment. F
MFT 238 Advanced CNC Programming
4-0-4
Advanced computer numerical control (CNC) 3- and 4-axis programming and operation; setup and operation of industrial CNC turning center and vertical machining center. Prerequisite: MFT 138. S

Management
Business and Agri-Industries
217/351-2213 • www.parkland.edu/bai
MGT 101 Principles of Management
3-0-3
Managerial processes (planning, organizing, leading, and controlling) essential to the successful operation of various types of businesses. Student learns steps necessary to become an effective manager. Discussion of managerial challenges in today's workplace. F S Su
MGT 112 Human Resource Management
3-0-3
Planning, developing, and controlling human resources within the organization: recruiting, selecting, training, labor relations, salary, and fringe benefit administration. F S
MGT 113 Human Relations in the Workplace
3-0-3
Role of the individual in interpersonal relationships in organizations and business-related fields. Emphasis on the personal development necessary to succeed in the business organization. F S Su
MGT 116 Retail Management
3-0-3
Key perspectives that shape the retail marketplace including environmental influences, retail relationships, retail analysis and decision-making strategies will be emphasized. Important concepts including consumer satisfaction, supply chain relationships, ethics, social responsibility, and the use of technology.
MGT 117 Customer Service Management
3-0-3
Students analyze the characteristics of a model of good service in business and apply the principles derived from a comprehensive customer service strategy. Practical techniques for achieving customer satisfaction are integrated through analysis of customer communications.

Marketing
Business and Agri-Industries
217/351-2213 • www.parkland.edu/bai
MKT 101 Introduction to Marketing
3-0-3
Marketing in business and other types of organizations. Emphasis given to manager's role in development of marketing strategy: product planning, distribution, promotion, pricing, consumer behavior, industrial marketing, and market research. F S Su
MKT 130 Marketing for E-commerce
3-0-3
Introduction to online marketing tools and models, online research, Internet user characteristics, product and pricing strategies, distribution channels, and relationship marketing. F
MKT 155 Salesmanship
3-0-3
Principles of personal selling, including oral and written sales communication, business principles as applied to sales, consumer motivation, and product promotion. Includes sales performance demonstrations. F S
MKT 211 Marketing Management
3-0-3
Practical application of marketing principles: marketing strategy, demand analysis, product, price, promotion, and distribution strategies. Prerequisites: MKT 101 and MGT 101. S
MKT 218 Introduction to Global Marketing
3-0-3
Overview of marketing process in an international context: domestic and international business operations in world marketplace; social, political, cultural, and economic differences among countries and their impact on marketing. S

Millwright
Engineering Science and Technologies
217/351-2481 • www.parkland.edu/est
MLL 113 General Background for Millwrights
3-6-5
Concepts commonly found in blueprints; precision measuring tools; basic layout and piece part measurement; bolts, fasteners, and torquing; lubrication. Prerequisites: CCA 111 and CCA 112.
MLL 114 Machine Components
2-3-3
Theories of pneumatics and hydraulics, types of bearings and their uses; lubrication; types of gaskets, packing, and seals; fundamentals of power transmission; safety issues; related mathematics. Prerequisites: CCA 111 and CCA 112.
MLL 116 Machine Installation I
1-3-2
Operation and handling of various types of pumps and valves, inspection, troubleshooting, rigging and safety. Prerequisites: MLL 113 and MLL 114. F S
MLL 117 Machinery Alignment I
1-3-2
Care and use of alignment instruments, shaft alignment procedures, including rim and face, double reverse, and laser alignment, safety procedures including lockout/tag-out. Prerequisite: MLL 116. F S
MLL 118 Machine Installation II
1-3-2
Design, operation, and application of fans and blowers; theory and installation of various types of compressors; troubleshooting and maintenance. Prerequisites: MLL 116 and MLL 117.
MLL 119 Machinery Alignment II
1-3-2
Advanced theory, operation, and principles of optical instruments used in machinery alignment. Prerequisites: MLL 116 and MLL 117.
MLL 211 Valves
.5-3-1.5
Theory and operation of valves; overhaul procedures, installation, maintenance, and valve setting procedures. Prerequisite: MLL 119.
MLL 212 Turbines
2-0-2
Main construction and design features of gas turbines used for power generation; emphasis on GE gas turbines. Prerequisites: MLL 118, MLL 119, MLL 291, MLL 292, MLL 293, MLL 294, and MLL 295.
MLL 216 Monorails and Conveyor Systems
1-3-2
Basic installation procedures for various types of monorail and conveyor systems. Prerequisite: WLD 112.
MLL 291 Confined Space
1-0-1
Safe entry procedures, monitoring principles, entry permits, OSHA standards, role of those entering confined spaces, attendants assigned to confined spaces. Prerequisite: approval of instructor or department chair.
MLL 292 Forklift Operation
0.5-1.5-1
Theory and practical skills for the sit-down counter forklift. Prerequisite: approval of instructor or department chair.
MLL 293 Scaffold User
0.5-0-.5
Common hazards and safety regulations for scaffold use. Meets OSHA requirements for Scaffold User Safety and Health Certification. Prerequisite: approval of instructor or department chair.
MLL 294 Rigging
0.5-1.5-1
Knots, bends, and hitches for specific rigging applications to safely lift and move heavy objects according to OSHA regulations.
MLL 295 Aerial Lift
0.5-1.5-1
OSHA operator training for aerial and platform lifts.

Military Science
Admissions and Records
217/353-2638
MSC 101 Introduction to Military Science
2-0-2
Introduction to leadership in the military. Includes organization, mission, and function of the Army; principles of leadership, tools and techniques for student success while in college. One weekly 90-minute leadership laboratory and one weekly 70-minute physical exercise session required. Prerequisite: department permission required. F
MSC 102 Map Reading and Land Navigation
2-0-2
Fundamentals of military and U.S. Geological Survey map reading including methods such as intersection and resection; land navigation and orienteering techniques and their applications. Field trips and mandatory leadership laboratory. Prerequisite: department permission required. S
MSC 103 Military Mountaineering and Survival
2-0-2
Fundamentals of military mountaineering and survival. Covers scaling rock surfaces and rappelling; emplacement of rock bridging; and military survival techniques including camouflage and combat lifesaving. Field trips and mandatory leadership laboratory. Prerequisite: MSC 101 or approval of instructor. F
MSC 105 Military Marksmanship
2-0-2
Fundamentals of military rifle marksmanship. Systematic study of maintenance, operation, and employment of Army's primary individual weapon system, M16 rifle. Weapons safety, military marksmanship techniques and tactics, risk assessment and management, integration of live-fire M16 range. Field trips and mandatory leadership laboratory. Prerequisite: MSC 101 or approval of instructor. S

Massage Therapy
Health Professions
217/351-2224 • www.parkland.edu/hp
MSG 111 Introduction to Massage Therapy Theory
1.5-0-1.5
Introduction to the profession of massage therapy, professional ethics, and Swedish Massage techniques. Prerequisites: admission into the massage therapy program and BIO 111 with a grade of C or higher.
MSG 112 Massage Therapy I
1-6-4-
Expanded basic theory and techniques of massage therapy; benefits, indications, contraindications, draping, body mechanics, client interviews, chair massage, equipment, and supplies. Massage techniques combine to culminate in a full body massage. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in MSG 111. S
MSG 113 Pathology for Massage Therapists
3-0-3
Mechanics of selected disease processes and effects of massage on those processes. Indications and contraindications for massage included. Prerequisites: MSG 111 and MSG 112. S
MSG 114 Massage Therapy II
3-7-6.5-
Introduces intermediate level therapeutic techniques. Joint mobilization, hydrotherapy, sports massage, positional release, neuromuschular therapy and deep tissue techniques. Contemporary massage and bodywork topics include myofascial release, manual lymph therapy, trigger point therapy, foot reflexology, hot stone massage and others. Prerequisites: MSG 112 and current CPR card. S
MSG 115 Business Practices and Ethics
3-0-3
Introduction to major aspects of building and maintaining a successful practice. Starting a new practice, establishing a bookkeeping system, maintaining client records, delivering a business plan, and legal and ethical issues, including professional ethics, scope of practice, and contemporary issues in the profession. Su
MSG 117 Massage Therapy III
2-4-4
Asian bodywork traditions including acupuncture, Shiatsu, and Jin Shin Do. Reiki and cranial-sacral therapy, nutrition, stress reduction, assessment, treatment planning, and specific conditions addressed by massage therapy. Prerequisites: MSG 113, MSG 114, and MSG 119. Su
MSG 119 Musculoskeletal Anatomy/Msg Thrpy
3-0-3
Origin, insertion, action, and innervation for major muscles. Prerequisites: BIO 111, MSG 111, and MSG 112. F
MSG 131 Massage Therapy Clinical Practicum I
1-4-2-
Supervised clinical experience designed to provide training and practical experience in therapeutic massage. Students must spend 45 hours at on- or off-campus locations experiencing real-life application of massage techniques. Prerequisites: MSG 114 and current CPR card. S
MSG 132 Massage Therapy Clinical Practicum II
0-3-1-
Supervised clinical experience designed to provide training and practical experience in therapeutic massage. Students must spend 45 hours at on- or off-campus locations experiencing real-life application of massage techniques. Prerequisites: credit or concurrent enrollment in MSG 131 and current CPR card. Su

Music
Fine and Applied Arts
217/351-2392 • www.parkland.edu/faa
MUS 100 Music Fundamentals
3-0-3
Music notation, scales, chords, and key signatures for non-music majors with little or no background in music fundamentals. F S Su
MUS 101 Music Theory and Harmony I
3-0-3
Major, minor, and modal melody; major, minor, and diminished triads; chord progression, doubling, and spacing in four parts; application of voice leading principles; triads in first and second inversion; phrase structure and cadences; elementary music form study. Concurrent enrollment in MUS 103 recommended. Prerequisite: MUS 100 or equivalent. F
MUS 102 Music Theory and Harmony II
3-0-3
Continuation of MUS 101: harmonic progression, four-part harmonization, non-harmonic tones. Principles of melodic writing: motive use and variation, phrase structure, and analysis involving inversions of seventh chords. Concurrent enrollment in MUS 104 recommended. Prerequisite: MUS 101 or equivalent. S
MUS 103 Ear-Training, Sight-Singing, and Keyboard Harmony I
2-0-2
Develops hearing and notational skills through weekly classroom lectures and computer lab assignments. Emphasis on basics of pitch and rhythm reading. Use of movable do solfege. Aural identification of diatonic major-scale intervals and basic triad qualities. Aural identification of short, non-modulating chord progression consisting primarily of root-position triads. Correlated keyboard experience. F
MUS 104 Ear-Training, Sight-Singing, and Keyboard Harmony II
2-0-2
Continuation of MUS 103: emphasis on pitch and rhythmic aspects of sight-singing and melodic dictation; major and minor triads in root position and inversions; dominant seventh chords. Correlated keyboard experience. Prerequisite: MUS 103. S
MUS 121 Music Appreciation
3-0-3
(IAI F1 900) Understanding music through perceptive listening. Deals with elements of music (melody, rhythm, harmony, form, tone color) and how they are combined to create a given musical effect. Small and large music forms studied from various eras in music history. Emphasis placed on increasing one's aural awareness of what is happening in music. F S Su
MUS 123 Introduction to American Music
3-0-3
(IAI F1 904) Introduction to recorded music of the United States: religious music and folk influences, blues, gospel, country, rock, Broadway, ragtime, jazz, and fine art music presented with a view toward the awakening of critical abilities helpful in the understanding and enjoyment of music. F S
MUS 124 Intro to Non-Western Music
3-0-3
IAI F1 903N Introduction to music from diverse cultures with special attention to the influence of society, religion and visual arts on music of various regions. Students will learn style and genre identification, primary instruments, dances and compositional approaches found in world music. F S Su
MUS 134 Introduction to Recording Studio
2-2-3
Multi-track recording techniques; practical skills developed using microphones, signal processing, tape machines, and mixing consoles. Students receive hands-on training and engineer recording sessions. Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credit hours. F S Su
MUS 135 Intermediate Recording
2-2-3
MUS 135 is a continuation of MUS 134. Study of recording through an investigation of digital audio workstations, digital editing, synthesis, MIDI, acoustics and other processes. Students receive hands on training and experience through engineering recording sessions and projects. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. F S Su
MUS 141 Choral Ensemble---Parkland Chorus
0-3-1
Develops artistic choral singing ability through performance of choral literature. Ability to read music not necessary. Open to students and members of the community with consent of instructor. Repeatable for a maximum of 4 credit hours. Also offered as noncredit CMS 441. F S
MUS 142 Choral Ensemble---Chamber Singers
0-3-1
Perform the music from Renaissance to contemporary classics. Fair knowledge of sight-singing helpful. Audition required or consent of faculty member. Repeatable for a maximum of 4 credit hours. F S
MUS 146 Instrumental Ensemble---Wind Ensemble
0-3-1
Rehearses and performs challenging, contemporary literature for wind and percussion instruments. This auditioned ensemble is open to students, faculty, and members of the community. Repeatable for a maximum of 4 credit hours. Also offered as noncredit CMS 446. F S
MUS 147 Instrumental Ensemble---Orchestra
0-3-1
Open to all students and members of the community. Reading and performance of all styles of symphonic repertory. Repeatable for a maximum of 4 credit hours. Offered to district residents as noncredit CMS 447. F S
MUS 148 Instrumental Ensemble---Concert Band
0-3-1
Maintains complete symphonic band instrumentation for study and performance of all types of band literature. Open to all students and members of the community. Repeatable for a maximum of 4 credit hours. Offered to district residents as noncredit CMS 448. F S
MUS 149 Jazz Ensemble---Big Band Jazz
0-3-1